Coffey Centennial (1856-1965): Lodges

Coffey Centennial (1856-1965): Lodges

The Masonic Lodge Earl Lodge No. 285 is the oldest lodge located in Coffey, MO. It was organized on March 30, 1868, with the charter granted on October 15, 1868. The first lodge hall was located over the Henry Githens Store on the northeast corner of Main and Center...
Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): School

Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): School

The first school in Salem Township was held in the home of Mathew Harbord one mile west of Coffey, MO, and was taught by Dr. Watts, a Maine Yankee. The first public school in Coffey was located in a wooden building on the lot which is now (1956) used as a city park....
Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Coffey Colt Show

Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Coffey Colt Show

The Coffey Colt Show was started by T.J. Williams and Sam Bennum. They had stud horses and offered prizes to the three best colts from their studs, to be shown on Main Street in Coffey, MO. The event spotlighted horses and mules and fostered a more competitive spirit...
Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Railroad

Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Railroad

The railroad line between Trenton and Pattonsburg was constructed during 1896 and 1897, being completed to Pattonsburg on June 29, 1897. The Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City Railroad Company began operating from Quincy, Illinois, to Pattonsburg, MO, on January 23,...
Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Baptist Church

Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Baptist Church

The Coffey Baptist Church was organized on January 19, 1888. Elder U.H. Harper was elected moderator and Bro. Geo. L. Netherton was elected clerk. Fort-two presented church letters from other churches and became members. The church was known as the New Salem Baptist...

Coffey Centennial (1856-1956): Early Settlers

In compiling information for the Coffey Centennial book, those people who settled within a 5-mile radius of Coffey on or before 1860 were identified, including the names of descendants who lived in Coffey at the time of publication (1956). A group of eight ladies...