Breif Sketch

When the January 11, 1900, issue of the newspaper was printed, Gallatin was 62 years old. The <MI>North Missourian<D>, edited by C.M. Harrison, ran a front page story offering "A brief sketch of the founding and early days of Gallatin."

When the January 11, 1900, issue of the newspaper was printed, Gallatin was 62 years old. The <MI>North Missourian<D>, edited by C.M. Harrison, ran a front page story offering "A brief sketch of the founding and early days of Gallatin."

62 Years Old

The eighth day of January is a historic date in the annals of our country. General Jackson with his hardy southerners on that day, 1815, defeated the flower of the British army and forever ended the English dream of territorial possession between the Gulf and the Great Lakes. This day was for years celebrated by the people of this section with all the zest that July 4th is now observed. Consequently when the settlers of this portion of Daviess County planned to lay out a town, plat and sell lots on the present site of Gallatin, January 8th was selected as the date with the object of attracting a larger crowd of buyers. In December of 1837 the town site was surveyed and lots laid out by Madders Vanderpool, and the following 8th of January occurred the first sale of lots….

The first building was a log dwelling house built on the site of the red brick Brown residence on East North Street. The first business house was one built by Jacob Stollings on the spot where Knaner’s tailoring house now is. It was used for what was called a "country store" where was handled every sort of merchandise including a liberal stock of whiskey. During that same season two other buildings were erected <197> one on the corner where the Irving-Richardson hardware now is, the other, a log house, where J.W. Meade’s new residence stands. The former of these two was occupied by Maj. Joseph McGee as a tailor shop. These four buildings were destroyed by the Mormons during the fall of that year. Maj. McGee, to whom we are indebted for the historical data of this sketch, tells us that the Mormons robbed him of all his cloths and clothing and took him prisoner; and when they raided the "country store," they rolled barrel after barrel of liquor from the store, broke in the heads and by the use of tin cups they consumed all the whiskey, getting on a glorious religious drunk. John A. Williams was Gallatin’s first grocery man.

When the time came for naming streets, after calling one Main street and the one crossing it in the center of the town Grand street, because it extended toward Grand River, the projectors of the town began to appropriate names of illustrious people. Just north of Grand was Jackson street, named in honor of the great general; east of Main the first street was named Adams; farther east is Clay; south of Grand the first street was named Van Buren, who was then president, and farther south, Johnson street, named for Van Buren’s vice president.

A parallel to this disposition to use celebrated names is found in the names of the townships. We have Lincoln, Salem, Marion, Colfax, Benton, Harrison, Sheridan, Monroe, and between Jefferson and Jackson are appropriately placed Liberty and Union.

Daviess County was named for Joe Daviess, an old soldier of Kentucky; Gallatin was so called in honor of Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under President Jefferson….

Last Monday Gallatin was 62 years old <197> in reality in her babyhood. …By reason of some illustrious citizens, whose names have become known throughout the nation, Gallatin’s fame has become widely spread. And the name she bears is an honorable one.

Internally, the resident citizens are proud of the town. Her clean streets, well laid in macadam, her numerous comfortable homes, her modern churches, her exceptional educational facilities, all are far in advance of the remotest dream of the good men who projected the city….

In February, 1851, the town of Gallatin was incorporated as a city but it did not last. In 1857 the town was re-incorporated as a city by a special act of the legislature approved November 21 of the same year, and Gallatin became a city. From a burg of 400 people she has grown to a city of over two thousand, and supplied with every up-to-date equipment of a first-class metropolis….

The anniversary of the birth of Gallatin passed quietly; there was no demonstration…

A sketch of this sort about Gallatin would be incomplete without prominent mention of Maj. McGee. He has been identified with every portion of Gallatin’s history….It was he and Judge Richardson who in an early day thwarted an attempt to cut off six miles from the south border of Daviess County and a proposed removal of the county seat to Jameson. The scheme was to add six miles to the north border of Daviess by cutting off that amount from Harrison. Major McGee and Judge Richardson spent three weeks at Jefferson City, working against the proposed enactment and thwarted the scheme….

The prospect for the future of Gallatin is flattering. The bright pages of her history are yet to be written. Some of her citizens are to mount higher pinnacles of success than have ever yet been reached by any of them. The attractions of the city will attract more people to our borders. Before a century of Gallatin’s existence has rolled around, the changes will be more marked than the growth of the past sixty years. All Gallatin needs is a united effort on the part of all good citizens to advance the material interests of the city and to elevate the standard of morals of her people.

Researched by Wilbur Bush

A New Source of Income – Good or bad; The 21st Amendment

Daviess County was plagued with bootleggers in the early twentieth century. One example of bootlegging was made in 1924 when a liquor raid was made upon a site containing four stills, 21 barrels of mash, 30 5-gallon jugs, 100 1-gallon jugs and seven gallon corn whiskey.

Daviess County was plagued with bootleggers in the early twentieth century. One example of bootlegging was made in 1924 when a liquor raid was made upon a site containing four stills, 21 barrels of mash, 30 5-gallon jugs, 100 1-gallon jugs and seven gallon corn whiskey.

Also found was the necessary apparatus and materials necessary for whiskey making as well as four dead rats in one of the barrels. Up to this time, this raid was the biggest liquor raid ever made in Daviess County. Just two days prior, two stills had been captured in a nearby town.

It was estimated a barrel of mash will make eight to ten gallons of whiskey that would sell for about $10 a gallon; therefore, the mash destroyed represented some $2,000 or $3,000 worth of whiskey.

In 1933, the 21st Amendment made the sale of alcoholic beverages legal. Now, beer could be purchased like any other soft drink. Many people realized that much bootlegging existed and thought the bootleggers might as well pay taxes on their product.

There were several ways the new law would bring in new revenue:

1. It imposed a one cent per gallon inspection fee.

2. Brewers ere required to buy a $500 licence each year.

3. Wholesalers were required to pay an annual license tax of $50.

4. Restaurants and other places that sold beer for consumption on their premises were required to pay a ten dollar tax.

5. Grocers and merchants who sold beer in packets were required to pay an annual tax of $55.

A restaurant in a small Northwest Missouri received the first consignment of 35 cases of beer. In approximately eight hours, eight cases had already been sold and a new order for an additional 25 cases had been made.

From: "State ratifies 21st Amendment," TGD v65 n8 8/24/33; "Beer in Missouri due in a few days" GNM v69 n28 3/16/33; "4 stills, 21 bbls. mash, 130 jugs, 3 men caught" TGD v56 n18 11/20/24

Researched by Wilbur Bush

Banks in Trouble

Part 1
Our country was in a serious financial state in the 1920s. The small town banks had thrived in the early part of the twentieth century partly due to the slow method of transportation. Almost every small town had at least one bank if not two or more.

Part 1
Our country was in a serious financial state in the 1920s. The small town banks had thrived in the early part of the twentieth century partly due to the slow method of transportation. Almost every small town had at least one bank if not two or more.

What we will find is that it was not the quality of the banking business as much as the multitudes of banks that existed, that was one of the main roots of the banking crisis that ruined so many banks, bankers, and depositors during the Great Depression era. As the year 1921 approached, the financial economy of many small banks was not in the best situations. Locally, the small Bank of Mabel transferred its business to the Farmer’s State Bank in Cameron, because the consensus was the bank didn’t do enough business to warrant the maintenance of a bank. It wanted to suspend its operation while depositors could be paid in full. In the same year, the Winston bank closed. Its problem was referred to as "frozen assets" which means the bank had loans it was able to realize on, although probably safely secured. Within the next few years, most banks were financially weak and were closing their doors. Several banks listed below, were located within a twenty-five mile radius of Gallatin and closed in the four years from 1924 to 1928. Carlow Bank – Carlow, closed 1924 Bank – Lock Springs, closed 1925 Bank – Altamont, closed 1925 People’s Exchange Bank – Jamesport, closed 1925 Commercial Bank of Jamesport – Jamesport, closed 1925 Harrison County Bank – Bethany, closed 1927 Bethany Savings Bank – Bethany, closed 1927 Farmer’s Bank – Jameson, closed 1927 Bank of Jameson – Jameson, closed 1927 Bank – Kingston, closed 1927 Bank of Melbourne – Melbourne, closed 1927 Farmer’s State Bank – Winston Farmer’s Exchange Bank – Gallatin, closed 1934 Five banks in Trenton consolidated into four banks. Part 2 The downfall of the banks also brought down the downfall of the farmers and the working class. The banks started to call in their loans from the borrowers. This was legal because the loan papers contained a clause that stipulated the loans could be payable on demand. Now banks were demanding payment in full within a short period of time. Borrowers didn’t have any way to pay off their loans. There wasn’t any insurance on the depositors accounts. With the loss of their monetary assets, people couldn’t pay their debts. The banks also took the depositors money with them. The depositor seemed to be the loser. As a rule, depositors were only refunded a certain percent of the money they had in their account which might range from a low of 20-30% at one bank, to a high of 75-80% at a nearby bank. Three typical examples are the depositors at the Bank of Jameson were refunded 50 cents on the dollar. The depositors were paid six percent of their deposits and in 1930 received a second dividend ranging from 15-25%. It was made possible using the money from a ten thousand dollar judgment against four bank directors. The Farmer’s State Bank at Winston, had one of the best repayment rates. It repaid approximately 100 cents on the dollar. The Citizen’s State Bank at Altamont, refunded their depositors three percent of their accounts; however, after it had been closed eight years, the depositors received a second dividend which allowed them to receive 53% of their account. Along with many others in our nation, the director at the Bank of Jameson also took his life when the bank failed. Several bankers were sent to prison on the charge of accepting deposits after a bank failed or was in serious financial upheaval. The sentences might vary from two to five years. Still, other bankers went into bankruptcy. President Roosevelt closed all the banks for a short period of time which extended from March 6, 1933 to March 13, 1933. The main purpose of the shutdowns was to eliminate the weak banks. The strong banks would be allowed to reopen immediately and banks on the borderline would reopen on a trial basis, the rest were to remain closed. Banks soon started to charge service charges on their customer’s accounts. They contended that it was not to make a profit, but to prevent losses from rendering their services. Part 3 Many farmers who had borrowed money from the insurance companies couldn’t make their payments and many farms were repossessed. Likewise, many farmers couldn’t pay their back taxes and their farms were also repossessed. Large loan companies and large insurance companies often purchased the bank’s repossessed notes, sometimes for less than one-fourth of the note’s value. In turn, many of these insurance companies would work with the farmers who’d lost their farms if they’d tried to, and had the ability to meet their obligations in the past. In other cases, the farms were rented to other farmers who’d been fortunate enough to keep a team of horses and some machinery. Both the farmer and the loan company received one-half of the crop’s income. Still other farmers were left with no land, no machinery, and no livestock. They had to seek other ways to have income, which was hard for many of them to do because farming was the only skills many of them possessed.

Researched by Wilbur Bush

Bandits – Gallatin Democrat 12/13/33

During the depression, crime was on the rise, some induced by families who needed to eat, while others robbed out of greed. The Albany mayor suggested that neighboring towns organize volunteer riot squads for the purpose of protecting the towns against bandits. He believed if the towns in this section organized squads, they’d be able to help each other out in case of emergencies. His plan was to organize a group of approximately 10 men and have them equipped with riot guns. These men would be available for immediate call if robbers did visit the town and would be properly armed to cope with the intruders. A series of signals would be placed at different points in the business section so the squad would be notified immediately if anything was happening.

During the depression, crime was on the rise, some induced by families who needed to eat, while others robbed out of greed. The Albany mayor suggested that neighboring towns organize volunteer riot squads for the purpose of protecting the towns against bandits. He believed if the towns in this section organized squads, they’d be able to help each other out in case of emergencies. His plan was to organize a group of approximately 10 men and have them equipped with riot guns. These men would be available for immediate call if robbers did visit the town and would be properly armed to cope with the intruders. A series of signals would be placed at different points in the business section so the squad would be notified immediately if anything was happening.

Researched by Wilbur Bush

Let’s Play Ball

The C.C.C. boys played no small part in Daviess County. They seemed to have "a finger in the pie." With their help and with the help of many others, Gallatin had a new ball diamond. These boys were aided with help from local relief workers, and funds from the C.W.A. and the E.R.A. It was estimated the construction would take approximately one month.

The C.C.C. boys played no small part in Daviess County. They seemed to have "a finger in the pie." With their help and with the help of many others, Gallatin had a new ball diamond. These boys were aided with help from local relief workers, and funds from the C.W.A. and the E.R.A. It was estimated the construction would take approximately one month.

The new diamond would replace the one at the old West End Park, and would be located at the north end of Dockery Park. The new diamond was to be 100 yards in length and eighty yards in width.

Up to this time, Gallatin had two teams – the white boys and the colored nine. A third team made of C.C.C. boys was started.

Researched by Wilbur Bush

A Bad Report Card

If a midyear report could have been issued in 1934, it would have several low scores. According to the Gallatin Democrat, some of the negative points for Missouri were:

If a midyear report could have been issued in 1934, it would have several low scores. According to the Gallatin Democrat, some of the negative points for Missouri were:

1. Missouri crop prospects were the lowest in 60 years.

2. Cinch bugs and other insects had been the worst than in the last 50 years.

3. Oats were the worst ever in the history of Missouri farming.

4. Wheat had ripened prematurely which resulted in many shriveled grains.

5. Hay yields were low and the smallest in recent years.

6. Timothy and old mixed hay meadows were in the worst shape ever seen. A large portion of this land was used for pasture due to the drought; many of these fields weren’t worth harvesting for hay.

7. At the time, it was believed the largest portion of the oat crop would have to be grazed and later sown to soybeans for foliage for their livestock.

Researched by Wilbur Bush

Gallatin Airport

In 1934, plans were being considered for the construction of an airport in Gallatin. The government’s allotment for the money under the C.W.A. would pay for 80% of the labor costs and 20% of the cost of the materials. Materials included were: paint, boundary markers, fencing, seeding and miscellaneous.

In 1934, plans were being considered for the construction of an airport in Gallatin. The government’s allotment for the money under the C.W.A. would pay for 80% of the labor costs and 20% of the cost of the materials. Materials included were: paint, boundary markers, fencing, seeding and miscellaneous.

The city had to either buy or lease ground for the airport. The plot of ground necessary for its construction were: two runways each having a width of 500 feet and a length of 3,000 feet. The mean slope of the land needed, wasn’t to exceed two percent. The field was to either be L-shaped or T-shaped.

It was reported on one week early in July, the C.C.C. boys were busy with projects which included working on the landing field in Alley bottom(?????).

(To me this confirms that Gallatin did have an airport.)

"Time Is Short For Getting Local Airport"

Researched by Wilbur Bush