Good Roads in 1913

In 1913 Missouri Gov. Elliott W. Major issued a proclamation setting apart two days in August when every able-bodied resident in the towns and rural areas of the state were to render personal assistance in improving the highways. At least 300,000 men were expected to respond and put two days hard work on the roads. Many of these people were willing to furnish teams and machinery.

In 1913 Missouri Gov. Elliott W. Major issued a proclamation setting apart two days in August when every able-bodied resident in the towns and rural areas of the state were to render personal assistance in improving the highways. At least 300,000 men were expected to respond and put two days hard work on the roads. Many of these people were willing to furnish teams and machinery.

The work of 300,000 men for two days would be equivalent to 6,000 days work. Young boys were also expected to turn out for the endeavor. The governor provided ample notice so that local authorities in every community could be prepared to handle the great throng of volunteer road workers. Gov. Major proposed personally to pick up a pick and shovel for one new highway project near Jefferson City, and he expected every state official to do the same.

As with all propopals, this program prompted vocal opposition. By coincidence, the announced days for “Road Days” conflicted with the popular Chautauqua held in Gallatin. Thus, locally at least, some people had choose between which event they would support. Some of the excuses, complaints and sentiments were as follows:

“I believe Gov. Major struck upon a brilliant idea when he issued his road proclamation setting apart Wednesday and Thursday, August 21 and 22, and known as ‘Good Roads Days.’ Every able bodied man in the rural districts and the cities of the state were requested to put in these days work on the public highways.”

“I do not intend to work on the roads. I pay my taxes and will not give any help to a Major advertising scheme.”

“If Elliott W. would furnish me with a gold sledge and plenty of ice water, I might take a one-hour twirl on some smooth road close to my home.”

“Work on the roads during the Chautauqua? Not for me. The governor should have been a little more considerate in selecting the dates.”

“Major’s road proclamation is the first good move he’s made since he became governor. I’ve applied for the boss of the gang in which Matt Givens is going to work.”

“I’d gladly work on the roads if my wife would let me. She says I work at home and that word “nik” is a word on the outside of free labor.”

My wife would not consent. She says if she’d pass along and see me working, it’d remind her of a prisoner — ball and chain – and she couldn’t bear me in that condition.”

“I can never tell in the morning what I will do before night. I might cast a bit of mother earth to the side.”

“If it is cool and pleasant on the morning of the 20th, I may run out in my automobile and see a few of the boys work.” Major doesn’t want any loafers watching the other men work, replied the questioner. “Oh, well, I won’t go out then.”

“I fully intended to work until the governor came out with his second notice asking that the women in the districts aid in the cause by furnishing the workers with lunches and encouraging them with their presence and good cheer. Their good cheer would make me so sad I couldn’t do any work.”

“I’m not able bodied, so that lets me out.”

“Major’s work proclamation is the first good move he’s made since his road proposition and I intend to get all the men out to work.”

“As far as I’m concerned, I won’t be able to work on account of other matters demanding my attention.”

“The governor estimates that work worth a million and a half will result. Let’s hope so. But even this amount won’t justify interference with our great Chautauqua.”

After much complaining from a large number of people concerning the conflict between the dates of the Chautauqua and Good Roads Day, it was decided to change the road days to August 13-14. On those days the road captains assembled men in gangs and used automobiles to take the workers to their various locations where the pick and shovel played an important part.

Researched by Wilbur Bush; SOURCES: “300,000 to do road work,” Gallatin North Missourian, July 10, 1913; “Many excuses are offered,” Gallatin North Missourian, July 24, 1913; “Road days for Daviess county,” Gallatin North Missourian, July 31, 1913; “Some good road work done,” Gallatin North Misourian, August 14, 1913.

1947: Pennies Worth Dollars

On April 16-17, 1947, Gallatin merchants tried a gimmick that brought many people to Gallatin to shop. The gimmick was the 1939 penny. On these two days if you had a penny bearing this date you could trade it for some merchandise at the local store. Some items listed were worth 10 cents and some were more than a dollar.

On April 16-17, 1947, Gallatin merchants tried a gimmick that brought many people to Gallatin to shop. The gimmick was the 1939 penny. On these two days if you had a penny bearing this date you could trade it for some merchandise at the local store. Some items listed were worth 10 cents and some were more than a dollar.

When people heard the news, penny hoarding occurred. Not only were children searching for pennies, but adults as well. It was estimated the 1939 pennies ran about one or two to the 100 pennies in circulation. One lady, an exception to the rule, found 50 of them.

Banks and business houses had been trading other denominations for pennies at the request of the customers. The Courter Theater gave a show for the school children with the admission price of a 1939 penny. Those students with the penny were allowed to miss school for the movie if they brought their penny to school.

“Penny Day” was a success. It brought customers from nearby towns as well as Gallatin itself. Store owners claimed they saw people they’d never seen before. Customers were present from Hamilton, Maysville, Cameron, Bethany and Gallatin. All the banks from these towns, as well as others, reported a run on pennies. One Gallatin woman received 18 by air mail from her daughter in Chicago.

Most of the stores were jammed with customers throughout the two days. Some even found customers outside their building waiting for the stores to open. Drugstores, which had listed malted milks and ice cream sodas were especially busy. A department store advertising ladies silk hose for a 1939 penny sold its supply within a few hours. Many stores received more than 100 pennies while a few received over 200.

Not only did the penny sales bring the people to Gallatin, but they purchased many other things at the stores and some thought they might have gained a few regular customers.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

1948: Gallatin’s First Wolf Hunt

In January of 1948, Gallatin’s first wolf hunt was held. The hunt had a two-fold purpose. One purpose was to rid the community of the wolves which preyed on game, sheep and cattle. The other purpose was to donate the bounty money to the March of Dimes campaign.

In January of 1948, Gallatin’s first wolf hunt was held. The hunt had a two-fold purpose. One purpose was to rid the community of the wolves which preyed on game, sheep and cattle. The other purpose was to donate the bounty money to the March of Dimes campaign.

It was hoped that 400 men would participate. The hunt would cover a four-square mile area south and west of Gallatin. The hunters were to meet on the east side of the square on Sunday morning. Trucks would be waiting to transport the men to their destination and to bring them home.

The hunters would line up on four sides of the area of the hunt and converge on a point near the cottonwood schoolhouse, southwest of Gallatin. A big balloon would be elevated in the vicinity of the school and all the hunters would work toward it.

The hunters were asked to wear something red for identification purposes, either a red hunting cap or jacket, or they could tie a red bandana around their neck or cap. There’d be a captain for each line and they were to be in charge of the men on the hunt.

No hunting license was required. Minors were not encouraged to participate. If they did, they were to be accompanied by their father or another adult. There was to be strict law enforcement and no drinking was to be allowed. Only shotguns were to be used and they had to be broken, or if automatic, the breach open when they gathered in Gallatin. During the hunt, all guns were to be carried with the safety on. No animals except coyotes and wolves were to be killed.

On the day of the hunt only 150 men, including men from St. Joseph and Kansas City participated. Only one predator was killed and the $5 bounty was given to the March of Dimes.

Plans were soon underway to form a Daviess County Wolf Association. Membership was $2.50 per member. A fund was to be set up by member contributions to pay a bounty in addition to the one the county was paying. It was to be organized in each township and two members of the individual township board were to serve on a county-wide association board. The township boards were to organize their districts for raising the bounty money.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

John D. Gagan and Crystal Springs

Once one of the most popular institutions of Northwest Missouri was the famous Crystal Springs on the John Gagan farm in Benton Township of Daviess County, about five miles northwest of old Pattonsburg on Crystal Springs Branch that empties into Sampson Creek.

Once one of the most popular institutions of Northwest Missouri was the famous Crystal Springs on the John Gagan farm in Benton Township of Daviess County, about five miles northwest of old Pattonsburg on Crystal Springs Branch that empties into Sampson Creek.

John Gagan was born in Cork, Kings County, Ireland, on the Shannon River on June 24, 1819, to John and Catherine Gagan. He was brought up a strict Catholic, to further educate him for the priesthood. At the young age of eight years he came to America with his father in 1827 and located in Bedford County, Penn., near the town of Bedford. Later he worked on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad which were the first rails built in the United States about 1836.

John also learned the stone-masons trade. He worked his way down the Ohio River and landed in Kentucky, where he met and married Sarah Devor Williams in 1846. In 1847, with the gold and silver they had saved, he rode horseback and headed for northwest Missouri to buy land. After buying 200 acres, he returned to Kentucky for his wife and they moved to Missouri in 1848.
John and Sarah had six children, all born on his farm in northwest Daviess County. He built up his land and raised his children on it. The couple had 28 grandchildren. He’d changed from Catholic to Christian earlier, known as Campbellites.

Although through the lineage there isn’t anyone to carry on the Gagan name, he has a legend for it. One of the most popular institutions of Benton Township or even Daviess County and northwest Missouri, was the famous Crystal Springs on the John Gagan farm about five miles northwest of old Pattonsburg on Crystal Springs Branch that empties into Sampson Creek. He planted fruit trees and grapevines, and there was a beautiful forest of trees on his farm. He was noted for having the best wine and winery west of the Ohio River.

The springs all had a chemical analysis that possessed healing properties. They all had a rocky bottom of limestone and soft slate stone, hard, and then succeeded by a species of limestone and hard brittle. John built a large resort, and guests numbering in the thousands came in the summer months to drink of their waters for medicinal purposes.

Someone found a gold coin along the road to the Springs, assumed he was rich and tried to rob him, and then burned the resort town down. He got out of the hotel alive, but was shot and killed on Dec. 15, 1887. A man was caught and tried. Who and was he found guilty? No proof of evidence could be found, other than matching boots and the tracks found around the place.

Today, John and Sarah D. are buried in the Oak Ridge Cemetery, Benton Township, Daviess County.

— compiled from the 1985 Daviess County History Book, submitted by Arley Pearson Wurdinger, who was a great-granddaughter of John Gagan

1960: The Upside Down Winter

In March 1960, Daviess County had an unusually large snow. An excerpt from the March 17, 1960, Gallatin Democrat stated that “winter-weary Daviess County is digging out from under the worst snowstorms of the season which hit the area Tuesday, dumping an additional 10 inches of snow accompanied by high winds which closed most roads and brought activity to a standstill.”

In March 1960, Daviess County had an unusually large snow. An excerpt from the March 17, 1960, Gallatin Democrat stated that “winter-weary Daviess County is digging out from under the worst snowstorms of the season which hit the area Tuesday, dumping an additional 10 inches of snow accompanied by high winds which closed most roads and brought activity to a standstill.”

Weather records were broken everywhere. Snowfall unofficially increased the snow count to 44 inches for the winter. When this last snow had ended, there was still over two feet of snow on the ground. Some drifts were four and five feet high.

This last snow storm lasted almost nine hours. A large portion of it was heavy. The highway department trucks, which had been battling to keep the roads open for several weeks, had to shut down because the blowing snow prevented them from seeing what they were doing. Traffic was held up several hours, delivery trucks couldn’t get through, mail was delayed, schools were closed, farmers had difficultly getting to pasture to feed their livestock. Even birds and wildlife were handicapped as to moving around and finding food. Country roads were covered with great drifts.

The large snow surface caused other effects by having a tendency to keep the air cold and stormy which caused more snow. Climatologists called it an “upside down” winter as it was colder than normal in the south and warmer than normal in the north.

Temperatures during the storm didn’t drop below 27 degrees. With only four days until spring, the area had only two or three days above freezing since Feb. 21. During this period of time the mercury had dropped three times below zero: March 4 it was nine below; March 5 it was 18 below; March 6 it was nine below.

According to the weatherman, the crazy March weather of 1960 started in February when a westerly river of air in the upper atmosphere moved suddenly south of its normal course across the country which produced the first March snows that covered most of the nation.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

Pattonsburg Dam Proposal Causes Concerns

“If the dam were ever built, it could mean the virtual end of Daviess County. It’s been estimated that over 65,000 acres of the most productive land in the county would be taken out of production. It would split the county in half.”

“If the dam were ever built, it could mean the virtual end of Daviess County. It’s been estimated that over 65,000 acres of the most productive land in the county would be taken out of production. It would split the county in half.”

The above quotation was taken from the March 3, 1955, edition of the “Gallatin Democrat” in regard to the construction of the Pattonsburg dam.

In 1949, steps had been taken to have some kind of flood control in the Grand River Valley near Pattonsburg. Some discussion centered on the construction of several smaller dams in the area, but the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers pointed out this would not be economically justifiable. If the dam was built at Pattonsburg, it would control a 12-inch runoff on 2,240 square miles. Six upstream dams that were studied would control only 1,491 square miles and would require an increase in levee heights to provide complete protection on the lower river.

It was pointed out that if the dam and its reservoirs were built the town of Pattonsburg would be flooded. Its population of 1,000 persons would be displaced.

There were about 180 farmsteads within the 50,000 acres of the proposed reservoir. Both schools and highways would be affected. The small villages of Santa Rosa, Weatherby, McFall and Jameson would suffer economically. The county would also suffer loss of the taxation of revenue from the 42,000 acres of land.

Like all projects, the building of a dam at Pattonsburg met with both favoritism and criticism. On the positive side of the argument it was said that the value of a lake, for no other reason than flood control, would save thousands and thousands of dollars in the event of a flood.

Many thought the dam would be good for a recreational center. It was believed the center would be a distinct benefit to the northwest section of the state. Another part of the project would be connecting the Pattonsburg-King City road which would hook up an area not being served at that time.

Those opposed to the dam used the tactic of reflecting on other places where dams had been built and the fact the people hadn’t been told the truth in some areas. For example, many people were under the impression that the scheme of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control of the Grand River involved the building of two big reservoirs known as the Pattonsburg and Hickory reservoirs and 85,000 acres of the best land in north Missouri provided complete flood protection for all the Grand River Valley lands below the dam.

Other factors supported the facts that in the years 1909 to 1943 if the dams had been in operation, in seven of those years the river-flood-height would have been reduced to bank full height at summer. But in 14 of those years the reduction wouldn’t have been enough to have prevented serious flooding of bottom lands in the area. The reason for this was that only 56% of the Grand River drainage area laid above the dams and the other 44% was still sufficient to cause serious flooding.

Many of the people of Daviess County thought those making a study of the flood situations should give more attention to soil conservation practices and head-water detention dams, and see if a plan couldn’t be made which wouldn’t ruin a county and destroy a city. They felt people not having to be separated from their friends and neighbors they’d established meant more than money.

Another example that gave more appeal to the situation was what had happened at nearby Chillicothe. At that point, Grand River had been at flood stage 89 times in 31 years. It was estimated that 50% of all the valley was considered “waste” or was untillable because of the flood hazard. It’d also have an impact on railroads, utilities and business in general.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

New Ambulance District Formed

In August 1971, the announcement was made that all the funeral directors in the five county area of Daviess, Gentry, Worth, Mercer and Harrison would terminate their ambulance service. This action meant Daviess County would have to set up some type of ambulance service by Jan. 1.

In August 1971, the announcement was made that all the funeral directors in the five county area of Daviess, Gentry, Worth, Mercer and Harrison would terminate their ambulance service. This action meant Daviess County would have to set up some type of ambulance service by Jan. 1.

An ambulance service was soon made possible by the Chamber of Commerce, the Lions Club and the Rotary Club, each paying $500 to underwrite the cost of the service for a period of six months. The service was to be set up as a non-profit corporation and known as the Emergency Ambulance Service and would operate on a 24 hour basis.

A locally hired driver would provide Gallatin’s service. Membership for the ambulance service was to be $10 per year per family. A vote was to be taken to pass a special tax levy. Even if this levy passed, there would still be a charge for the ambulance trip.

In October, a meeting was held composed of the Daviess County Court and Mr. Wallace, a member of the State Department of Health. They planned to have ambulance service with both Gallatin and Pattonsburg having an emergency vehicle. Mr. Wallace said his office goal was to get an ambulance where needed in 20 to 25 minutes. He also stated the Highway Safety Act provided matching funds for ambulance purchases and one fitting the needs of the Gallatin community would cost $8,732. Daviess County’s poor financial state was a barrier to the program and there wasn’t any surplus funds to operate an ambulance service.

When the levy was voted on, it failed to pass by 61 votes. It was illegal to call another special election before 12 months. However, it was thought if the ballot proposed the setting up of an ambulance district which would embrace the entire county another election could be held.

With only two weeks to solve the problem, Robert Calvert, who’d operated an ambulance service in Kansas City for five years, agreed to provide a manned 24 hour service in Gallatin. The attendant would be hired locally and the ambulance was to be tied in with a network of ambulance services headquartered at Bethany where a countywide service was being organized. Robert Eads was hired to care for the ambulance and respond to calls.

A new vote required 200 signatures, a district with a population of 2,000, and an assessed valuation of at least $2.5 million. Harrison and Jackson townships were added to the list, making seven townships.

In May 1972 the Eads Ambulance Service was discontinued. A new vote was taken and passed to have the new ambulance district. Another election was needed to elect a board to have the responsibility of deciding all questions.

The vote for the Community Ambulance District passed. The Board of Directors approved their estimated budget, and established a levy of 15 cents per $100 evaluation to operate the service. By late October, the district purchased a $11,500 package for just $3,500.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

Early Cars, Car Tags and Vehicle Licenses

Upon the arrival of the 1920s more and more people were driving cars. The new transportation was causing dirt roads to become outdated. At election time the General Assembly voted to levy a tax for road improvement. Amendment 6 allowed the state to issue bonds up to $600,000,000 for the construction of hard surfaced roads.

Upon the arrival of the 1920s more and more people were driving cars. The new transportation was causing dirt roads to become outdated. At election time the General Assembly voted to levy a tax for road improvement. Amendment 6 allowed the state to issue bonds up to $600,000,000 for the construction of hard surfaced roads.

Along with Missouri the Good Roads Federation declared two “auto tag days.” They urged car owners to decorate their vehicles with both a “Lift Missouri Out of the Mud” radiator emblem and a sticker on their car’s windshield. It was hoped they’d leave them there until after the November election. If the voting was favorable, they’d officially lift Missouri out of the mud. It was also suggested to have a sticker pasted on every glass store window where the owner would permit.

Gov. Gardner proclaimed Oct. 22 as “Good Roads Day” in all Missouri schools. On that date all the decorating would begin. The purpose of this endeavor was to impress upon the people the need to lift Missouri “out of the mud.” Fortunately, the amendment passed and the mud roads would be obsolete.

By 1925, car licenses were compulsory for the auto owners. The price of the licences were 50% higher than in 1924. A local distributing place was the Gallatin Motor Company. The cost of the licenses varied drastically from car to car. Two examples of this would be a car with less than 12 horsepower at $7.50 and car with 72 plus horsepower at $37.50.

As with any program there were dodgers who tried to get away without the licenses. But the authorities planned to check for these people. One afternoon, cars were checked carrying old state licenses. One car carried only one license plate, but it was the same as another man’s. The driver wasn’t aware of it until he was stopped. The owner of the car with the stolen plate was fined $50 and costs. In default of payment of fine, he was committed to the county jail.
In addition, Gallatin’s citizens had to pass an ordinance that stated they had to obtain a license to drive in the city.

To help cut out tag dodgers, a law was created that stated anyone on relief couldn’t obtain a license because it was believed that if they could afford a car they shouldn’t be on relief. The law also stated that citizens owning dogs couldn’t obtain a license because if they could afford the cost of the dog food they should also be able to feed their own families and their dogs.

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In the early 20th century, there weren’t any large car lots or billboards advertising automobiles. In fact, cars were in short supply. Even though the Ford Motor Company had manufactured 320,817 cars in a seven month period in 1916-17, there was an inadequate supply. It was necessary to be on a waiting list when wanting to buy a car.

The rising demand for Ford cars made it necessary for the company to allot cars to agents who had orders for immediate delivery rather than allow them to stock cars for later sales. All indications seemed to point to the fact that within 90 days the Ford industry would experience its greatest shortage due to increased sales and fear of a price increase.

The Ford Motor Company guaranteed its dealers against a reduction in their prices, but stated it would not guarantee against an advance.

In January 1917, the Gallatin car dealers were temporarily out of cars. The Gallatin Motor Company received a shipment of seven cars. However, in these early times, cars were only partly assembled upon arrival. The job was then completed by the mechanics at the local dealers.

Grocery stores, feed and poultry businesses, etc., were equipping the Ford chassis with bodies especially fitted for their needs.

At this time, cars were selling in the range of $350 to $600. Even though there seemed to be a shortage, car dealers were enticing sales by offering installment loans.
It was a family goal to own an automobile.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

Farmers Telephone Brings Dial System to Rural Areas

In July 1951, the officers and directors started the work for a new dial system for the rural areas being similar to the REA. The new company was called the Farmers Telephone Co-op.

In July 1951, the officers and directors started the work for a new dial system for the rural areas being similar to the REA. The new company was called the Farmers Telephone Co-op.

At that time, there were about 1,200 subscribers and several existing telephone companies had expressed a desire to sell to the co-op which included Daviess, Caldwell, Ray, Carroll and Livingston counties. The cooperative would be the first one in this area. If it worked out it was thought it would be the beginning of a plan which might cover a very wide area.

It would take a minimum of 2,000 subscribers before a cooperative could be established and the ultimate number of the cooperative was expected to be 5,000. Not more than eight parties could be on one line and for that reason, farmers were expected to sign up on that basis. After a line was filled no more subscribers could be taken on that line. This meant if the farmer didn’t sign up in the beginning it might be hard for him to do so later since the line could accommodate no more than eight. Still, farmers were given a “grace period.” They could wait until the engineer came to lay out the system, which took approximately 30 days after the maps had been turned in.

The new system would be fully automatic dial, and would have a double wire metallic to eliminate roaring and static. One of the several reasons this was important was that the telephone cooperative could use the power poles that were already in use by REA at a substantial savings in cost. This completely modern telephone would be accessible to the already existing REA customers.

Existing systems could be purchased in some instances, it was stated, where mutual agreements could be reached. It was desirable that all towns with less than 1,500 population would be regarded as rural and could participate in the program.

By March 1951, the co-operative had enough signers to put the plan in action. The Farmers Telephone Company was in position to buy out present privately-owned rural systems in order to make the co-cooperative and its automated system as far reaching as possible. Two of the proposed buy-outs were Civil Bend and Crab Apple.

There was a $5 registration fee with the application, but it would be returned if the co-operative was not formed. The customer wasn’t required to pay any more until he knew how much the cost would be per month. The monthly cost of the service after it had been installed was estimated to run between $2.75 and $3.75 per month. If not satisfied, or if the co-operatives weren’t formed, his $5 would be refunded. If he was satisfied, he purchased one share of the co-operative at $45. There could only be one share per person.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

1926 Grand River Flood

On Sept. 26, 1926, the Grand River once again was causing damage in our part of the country. There had never been a flood in September in Daviess County’s history. It was near harvest time and corn prospects were looking favorable. However, flood waters rampaged through the county and destroyed them. Some said the crop loss wasn‘t a complete failure; corn which wasn‘t too ripe would make soft corn for feeding purposes. To show the prospect of the corn crop’s yield before the flood, one man displayed an ear of corn that had been in the water 48 hours. The tip of the ear pointed downward so that the water drained off, leaving the ear of corn undamaged.

On Sept. 26, 1926, the Grand River once again was causing damage in our part of the country. There had never been a flood in September in Daviess County’s history. It was near harvest time and corn prospects were looking favorable. However, flood waters rampaged through the county and destroyed them. Some said the crop loss wasn‘t a complete failure; corn which wasn‘t too ripe would make soft corn for feeding purposes. To show the prospect of the corn crop’s yield before the flood, one man displayed an ear of corn that had been in the water 48 hours. The tip of the ear pointed downward so that the water drained off, leaving the ear of corn undamaged.

From Gallatin to Brunswick thousands of acres of farm land were under water. In many places, as far as the eye could see, there was nothing but water. it lacked about two feet of being as high as the well known flood of 1909. Many contended it might be equal to or greater than the great flood except for the fact new drainage ditches had been constructed over the county in the latter years.

The continual rains and overflows played havoc with roads and bridges. Thousands of dollars worth of damage had occurred. The repair was going to be a financial challenge because our country was still in its Depression years. The County Court had condemned the bridge over Gallatin‘s Grand River as the waters had done much damage to it. One of the peers was also damaged making the bridge unsafe.

The Wabash railroad was hard hit by all the waters along its line from Maryville to Brunswick as much of its tracks went through bottom land. The O.K. train service had been greatly impaired in north Daviess County due to washouts causing trains to cancel their runs.

The train master of the Wabash railroad said the loss to the Wabash during the recent flood would probably run up to $200,000, but there wasn’t any precise check on the loss since there wasn‘t any accurate way to determine the loss of business. The lower parts of Pattonsburg were covered with four and five feet of flood water.

Mail service was also hindered by the railroads not being able to deliver the mail; however, some of it was to be delivered by automobiles. One carrier from Braymer who still delivered by horses came very close to losing his life as well as his horses. He’d reached a river where the water was hub deep, but he still wanted to cross and deliver the mail – As the team stepped from the bridge, the horse went down with a part of the load, pulled the other horse in together with the buggy and Mr. Moore the carrier. He soon spotted his team caught in the brush of another tree farther down the river and tangled in the harness and would soon drown. He swam to them, caught the reins, pulled them up over a tree and waited until help arrived.

This mass of water was also treacherous to many farm renters and buyers who’d already lost money in the bank closings of the depression days and were trying to get back on their feet. They were counting on a good crop year to pay their rent and their mortgages. Some of the farmers were worse off than when they’d started in the spring.

other factors related to the flood also occurred. Approximately 40 people were stranded and were staying in an abandoned church near Fountain Grove in Livingston county waiting for the river to recede so they could return to their homes in the Grand River bottoms. The sheriff notified the townspeople of their plight and collected donations of clothing, shoes, and $168.85 in cash. Some of the money was used to purchase $44 worth of groceries and another lady bought dress goods for the children. The people in the church were so crowded they had to sleep on the benches and the floor of the building. Ticking enough to make nine straw ticks was purchased.

One saying proved to be false: It was said the then new Highway 6 built through the Wabash bottom was flood proof. However, after the heavy rainfall, water ran across the highway in three places, getting more than a foot deep. Traffic across the bridge was stopped because the east approach was showing signs of not holding up. when the engineers were laying out and building the road several years earlier, the old timers who did the engineering with their naked eye, told the state men the road wouldn‘t stand the test like the 1909 flood. The engineers were sure it would; however, it didn‘t!

GRAND RIVER FLOOD TIDBITS
• 1917 – In addition to the flood waters, wind, hail, and heavy rains did great damage to growing crops. Some of the hailstones measured four inches in circumference

• 1919 – The Omaha & St. Louis train No. 14, due in al7atin about midnight was ditched about three miles southeast of Pattonsburg while trying to pull through flood waters at Cypress Creek. r ie train was mvvfiig slowly at be tinTe and only the engine and one car left the track. The road bed had been washed out by the the flood and the weight of the engine carried the track down.

• 1922 – A Gallatin farmer had a 180 wheat crop estimated to have made 35 bushel to the acre and it was all in shock and waiting for the threshers when the flood waters destroyed his crop.

— researched and written by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

Ambulance Service Nearly Ends

Five counties, including Daviess County, were slated to forfeit their ambulance by January 1, 1971 unless proper measures were taken. The other four counties to be affected were Gentry, Worth, Mercer, and Harrison counties.

Five counties, including Daviess County, were slated to forfeit their ambulance by January 1, 1971 unless proper measures were taken. The other four counties to be affected were Gentry, Worth, Mercer, and Harrison counties.

This circumstance was due to five factors: (1) Inability to comply with the demands under the Medicare program. (2) Questionable position under definitions of the Federal wage and and Hour laws; (3) Questionable position under regulation of the Missouri public Service Commission; (4) Possible past and forthcoming regulations of the Federal Highway safety Act; (5) Risk of financial disaster, life, limb and happiness.

The five point notice was signed by all the funeral directors in the 5-county area. No one really blamed these funeral directors for their decision. Ambulance operations were marginally profitable or actually lost money. The seriousness of these realities meant the end of local ambulance service unless Daviess County set up some sort of an ambulance service by January 1, 1971.

The people were asked to vote a special levy to provide funds to purchase ambulances and to employ sufficient personnel to man them around the clock. In addition, there was to be a charge for each ambulance trip.

In mid-October, members of the Daviess County Commission initially declared plans to set up a three ambulance vehicle system — one vehicle each at Gallatin, Jamesport, and Pattonsburg. Later, it was suggested the county could be serviced by two ambulance vehicles, one in Gallatin and the other at Pattonsburg. The Jamesport area could best be served from Trenton. It was also pointed out that on average an area containing 24,000 people could expect one ambulance call per day. For the service to be profitable, an ambulance should serve the needs of 70,000 to 80,000 people living within a radius of nine miles. The goal was to get an ambulance where needed in 15 to 25 minutes. The Highway Safety Act would provide funds for the purchase of ambulances on a 50-50 basis with the local governments. The suggested type of ambulance would cost $8,732.

The only way to solve the ambulance dilemma was to vote a special levy and allow the county officials to organize some sort of new service. A large majority felt the need of such a service, but the levy vote failed the two-thirds majority by 61 votes. It was expected that the advisory council would try to have another election. Some felt the failure to pass the levy would tie the hands of the court due to the extreme poor financial condition of Daviess County. There were no funds available to operate an ambulance service, no matter how small the system. However, the county prosecutor informed the Daviess County Commission that they couldn’t legally call for another election for the purpose of voting a levy to operate an ambulance service for at least 12 months. He also stated there wasn’t anything to prevent the county from going ahead with plans for an ambulance service, financed by general revenue, but that would be difficult.

In mid-November, Robert Calvert was setting up a private ambulance service in Harrison County and was willing to expand his services into Daviess County if financial arrangements could be made. A study was made. Two proposals were made, one a county-wide service and a second covering only the Gallatin area.

Mr. Calvert, who’d operated an ambulance service in Kansas City for five years, would provide a manned ambulance in Gallatin to provide 24-hour service. The attendant would be hired locally and the Gallatin ambulance would be tied in with a network of ambulance service headquarters in Bethany where a countywide service was being organized. The Gallatin service would require a subsidy of $250 a month, but the actual cost of subsidy would be lower or eliminated if Calvert’s income was sufficient. He believed he must have $500 a month to operate successfully.

Several suggestions were made to raise the subsidy revenue. Some thought the Rotary Club, L ions Club, and the Chamber of Commerce should each pay $500 to be added to donations from concerned citizens in order to underwrite the plan and assure a start the ambulance service for a period of six months. During this time it was hoped the service could be developed on a permanent basis. The service was to start January 1, 1971, when the funeral homes planned to cease ambulance operation. In addition to subsidy, those using the ambulance would be charged $30 per call and 50 cents a mile for the trip. The service was to be set up as a non-profit corporation to be named the Emergency Ambulance Service Inc. Membership for the ambulance service was to be sold for $10 a year per family.

At the approaching end of the 1970, the ambulance was made available for a new ambulance service for the Gallatin community. Robert Eads of Gallatin was employed to be on call 24-hours a day. Although the ambulance service was set up with the aid of a subsidy of $500 each from the three Gallatin civic groups, the ambulance would respond to calls by anyone and go whenever or wherever it was called.

— information taken from 10 newspaper articles of the Gallatin Democrat spanning 1970; researched by Wilburn Bush

1864 Prospectus of the Gallatin North Missourian

The following Prospectus is reprinted from the Sept. 15, 1864, edition of the Gallatin North Missourian. Original copies of this first edition no longer exist; this Prospectus was reprinted in the July 22, 1971, edition which marked the 100th anniversary of the Winston train robbery by outlaws Frank & Jesse James. This conveys the intentions and hopes of the newspaper’s fledgling founds, Waters and Kost:

The following Prospectus is reprinted from the Sept. 15, 1864, edition of the Gallatin North Missourian. Original copies of this first edition no longer exist; this Prospectus was reprinted in the July 22, 1971, edition which marked the 100th anniversary of the Winston train robbery by outlaws Frank & Jesse James. This conveys the intentions and hopes of the newspaper’s fledgling founds, Waters and Kost:

PROSPECTUS of the NORTH MISSOURIAN
TO THE CITIZENS OF DAVIESS and ADJOINING COUNTIES

In soliciting your patronage for the new paper we have established in your midst, it were well to introduce ourselves to you, make known the political platform upon which we stand and define the principles we advocate.
First, then, we have both served and suffered in the army for the Union and been discharged from the service, and although we went from other States and not along with your friends and brothers, yet we fought side by side and shoulder to shoulder, in person and sentiment with every loyal man who went forth to defend the stars and stripes against an insolent and rebellious foe: — Hence we are Unconditionally for the Union and as a necessary consequence for the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency in the coming fall. In this only can we see the protection of Liberty and the salvation of our Country, for we Despise any Peace or Compromise with Traitors whereby one jot or tittle of our freedom, glory or happiness shall be sacrificed. War, we know, is a present curse to any people and only to be undertaken as a dire necessity, but this we consider a war in which liberty and the interests of the people make a final struggle for mastery with despotism and aristocracy. The war, then, must go on, and vigorously, to, till God says "It is enough," and freedom has triumphed.

Believing that free labor has made such mighty empires of the States lying immediately north of the Ohio River and, that slavery is a curse to any people and the cause of the rebellion, we shall advocate the principles of Emancipation and that line of policy which will carry Missouri to where she belongs — the front rank in the line of the great Free States.

We shall make the "MISSOURIAN" eminently a County paper, looking well to the interests of the farmer in all the various branches connected with agriculture, and shall earnestly and steadily advocate the thorough organization of Free Schools in every nook and corner of the County, and by every means in our power endeavor to build up and establish a high standard of social and religious sentiment.

Shall we be sustained? Will the people of this community walk up to the make and take and defend an administration paper? We do not expect or desire assistance from Sympathizers. No, our paper would burn their fingers and our principles shame their hearts, but to the Loyal and true we look for support. Shall we have it? Will not every man who counts himself for the Union in this great struggle not only take the paper himself but endeavor to extend our circulation and thereby spread his principles as well as our own.

We shall thoroughly canvass the County, but do not wait to be called on. Subscribe yourself and induce your neighbor to do likewise.
"THE NORTH MISSOURIAN" will be printed on good material and issued regularly every Friday morning at $2 a year, Invariably in Advance. This you will admit is a very low price when you take into consideration the steady advance of everything and especially of gold.

Hoping to merit and receive your subscriptions, advertising, and job work, we remain

Yours Etc.

WATERS AND KOST,
Editors and Proprietors

Gallatin, Mo., September, 1864

— reprinted from the July 22, 1971, edition of the Gallatin North Missourian

Seventh Day Adventist Church

A new 30×70 brick church building was dedicacted during a special service held Dec. 15, 1973, for members of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Gallatin. Guest speaker was A.V. McClure, president of the Missouri Conference.

A new 30×70 brick church building was dedicacted during a special service held Dec. 15, 1973, for members of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Gallatin. Guest speaker was A.V. McClure, president of the Missouri Conference.

The new church has a seating capacity of 100 and is located along Highway 13 in south Gallatin. This is the first church for the Gallatin congregation. Members had been meeting in homes and other buildings.

A modernistic steeple graces the church’s exterior; the handsome interior features deep red carpeting, stained glass windows, and red upholstered pews. The sanctuary is equipped with a virtually new electronic organ, a piano and a speaker system. The building has an entrance vestibule, space for classrooms on the east end, and restrooms.

There was no outstanding debt on the building or equipment when the church officially opened. Less than a dozen families made up the church family at the time of this opening.

Other church dignitaries attending dedication ceremonies were D.E. Latham, the conference secretary-treasurer; G.S. Cherry, lay activities chairman; and the district pastor, H.W. Spiva.

At the time of this dedication, The Seventh Day Adventist Church was present in 98 percent of all the countries in the world. The church maintains an extensive mission progam, both in the United States and worldwide. A recent study revealed that Seventh Day Adventists ranked highest in per capita giving and tithing of any denomination in the country.

The Hon. Alexander Dockery

There has hardly been a man, woman or child in northwest Missouri who has not been familiar by constant repition with the name of Alexander M. Dockery, whose career of public service has kept him almost constantly active in district, state and national affairs through an entire generation. For 16 years, Mr. Dockery represented the Third District in Congress, and during the Democratic Administration of President Wilson held the post of third assistant postmaster general.

There has hardly been a man, woman or child in northwest Missouri who has not been familiar by constant repition with the name of Alexander M. Dockery, whose career of public service has kept him almost constantly active in district, state and national affairs through an entire generation. For 16 years, Mr. Dockery represented the Third District in Congress, and during the Democratic Administration of President Wilson held the post of third assistant postmaster general.

His active public service has obscured the fact, except in his home town of Gallatin and among his more intimate friends, that Mr. Dockery began his career as a physician, and besides several other degrees is entitled to the letters, M. D. Governor Dockery, as he is known to all his friends, was born in Daviess County, Feb. 11, 1845. His parents were Rev. WilHs E. and Sarah E. (McHaney) Dockery, his father having been a distinguished minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. Mr. Dockery, who is the only survivor of three children was educated in Macon Academy, Macon, Mo., and in 1863 entered the St. Louis Medical College, and was graduated in March, 1865, with the degree of M. D. He later attended lectures at Bellevue College in New York, and the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia and began his first practice at Linneus, Mo., and from 1867 to 1874 practiced at Chillicothe. He was recognized as a skillful physician.

In March, 1874, having abandoned the medical practice, for other lines of endeavor, Mr, Dockery removed to Gallatin and became associated with Thomas B. Yates in the establishment of the Farmers Exchange Bank, an institution which has had a solid career for nearly 50 years. He served as its cashier until 1882. Prior to his election to Congress, Mr. Dockery served as County Physician of Livingston County from 1870 to 1874, was president of the Board of Education at Chillicothe in 1870-72, was a member of the board of curators of the University of Missouri from 1872 to 1882, and at Gallatin was a member of the city council 1878-81, and mayor during 1881-83. From 1878 until his election to Congress Mr. Dockery was chairman of  the Democratic Congressional Committee of the Tenth District, 1880 was chairman of the Congressional Convention at Brunswick, and in 1882, at the conveniton at Cameron was nominated for representative in Congress. Altogether there were six men in the field for the nomination, and it was one of the most exciting conventions held in that district for many years. The deciding ballot was the 28th. The opposition had been unable to unite, since Mr. Dockery was the second choice in all the counties. His election from the Third District came in November, 1882, and he continued as representative in Congress from March 4, 1883, to March 4, 1899. In the successive conventions Mr. Dockery was renominated without opposition. During his career in Congress Mr. Dockery was a member of the Committee on Claims, Committee on Accounts, Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads four years, and for the last ten years of his service in the house was a member of the Committe on Appropriations and had charge of the District of Columbia and the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Appropriation bills. From 1893 to 1895 he was chairman of what is known as the "Dockery Commission," which, among other notable achievements, de- vised the present accounting system of the national treasury. This system has been in successful operation since Oct. 1, 1894. During the World Fair at Chicago, he was chairman of a special committee appointed by the House to investigate and simplify methods of business. This committee’s elaborate report served as a basis for the work of organization of the Louisana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. While a member of the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads, Mr. Dockery was instrumental in securing the installation of the second fast mail train service in the United States, from New York to Kansas City by way of St. Louis. In 1886, Mr. Dockery was chosen permanent chairman of the Democratic State Convention at St. Louis. At the conclusion of the eighth term Mr. Dockery declined a renomination in order to enter the race for governor in 1900. He was nominated by acclamation in June of that year, the nomination speech being made by Hon. W. S. Cowherd of Kansas City. In the following November he was elected Governor of Missouri against his opponent, Joseph Flory, of Moberly. Taking his oath as governor, Jan 14, 1901, Mr. Dockery was chief executive of his native state four years. After retiring from the governor’s chair in 1905 he continued active in Democratic politics, being chairman of the state convention in 1906, and in 1912 was elected treasurer of the Democratic State Committee and reelected in 1914. At the beginning of President Wilson’s administration, Mr. Dockery was appointed Third Assistant Postmaster General, his appointment being confirmed by the Senate, March 13, 1913, and he entered upon his duties March 17th. As Third Assistant Postmaster General he had supervision and control of all the extensive fiscal affairs of the postal service, including the postal saving system. In 1906 Governor Dockery was awarded the degree of LL. D. by the University of Missouri. In the interval between his term as governor and his recent promotion to the Postoffice Department, Governor Dockery proved himself a citizen of force and influence in his home city of Gallatin. He served as a member and president of the board of education from 1906 to 1912, was president of the Gallatin Commercial Club from its organization in 1908 to 1914, and was president of the Daviess County Chautauqua Association since its organization in 1909. He was also chairman of the building committee which supervised construction of the new court house, and of the committee which supervised construction of the new Gallatin school house. Of his local activities, Governor Dockery probably takes most pride in his work as ex-officio road overseer in his county, a service which he has performed gratuitously but none the less effectively at various times during the past 30 years. Governor Dockery was married April 14, 1869, to Miss Mary E. Bird, daughter of Greenup Bird. All of the seven children of their marriage died in infancy. His wife died at the Executive Mansion, Jefferson City, January, 1903.

Governor Dockery has some interesting fraternal relations. In 1880 he was elected Eminent Commander of Kadosh Commandery No. 21, Knights Templar, at Cameron; in 1881 was elected Grand Master of Mis- souri Masons; in May 1883, was chosen Grand High Priest of the Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, and since 1886 he has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri, being chairman of the Executive Committee the greater part of the time. In May, 1910, he was elected Grand Master of the Missouri Odd Fellows, and this gives him the unusual distinction of being the only person in the state who has been Grand Master of both Missouri Masons and Missouri Odd Fellows. Beginning May, 1909, he served 12 years as president of the Odd Fellows Home Board at Liberty. Governor Dockery has been a liberal contributor and supporter to the cause of the Y. M. C. A., and is now serving as a director. In July, 1906, Mr, Dockery donated the original land for the City Park which is now known as "Dockery Park," which now contains 14 acres, located in the northeast part of Gallatin. The Governor is very proud of his work in building up and beautifying this park, which is a valuable asset to the city. He has been president of the Park Board since its organization. The people of Missouri have honored Governor Dockery with their confidence and respect, and have found him worthy. They have trusted in his honesty and integrity, and have always found him true.

HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES, MISSOURI. DAVIESS COUNTY BY JOHN C. LEOPARD AND BUEL LEOPARD. ILLUSTRATED. HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, TOPEKA— INDIANAPOLIS. 1922

The Territory Embracing What Became Daviess County

The territory now embraced in Daviess County was at the formation of the State of Missouri, attached to the county of St. Charles, which included all of the territory lying North of the Missouri River as well as some territory south of the river. The County of Howard was organized by the territorial legislature in January, 1816, and the present Daviess County was attached to this new county. In 1820 the first State Legislature organized the County of Ray which embraced that part of the State lying North of the Missouri River and west of Grand River.

The territory now embraced in Daviess County was at the formation of the State of Missouri, attached to the county of St. Charles, which included all of the territory lying North of the Missouri River as well as some territory south of the river. The County of Howard was organized by the territorial legislature in January, 1816, and the present Daviess County was attached to this new county. In 1820 the first State Legislature organized the County of Ray which embraced that part of the State lying North of the Missouri River and west of Grand River.

It was not until 1830, however, that the first white man settled in what is now Daviess County. This territory had formerly been inhabited by tribes of Sacs, Foxes, Pottawatomies and Musquakies and it was not until 1834 that the last Indian camp disappeared. Their last camp was Auberry Grove, north of the present town of Jamesport. It is said that hunters and trappers had visited this section of the country as early as 1826 but no homes had been built prior to 1830. Probably the first house in the county was built by John and Mayberry Splawn, who came to the county in Jan., 1830. The cabin was erected near the present site of the Rock Island depot. The Splawns soon removed east of Gallatin to what is still known as Splawn Ridge. The third cabin was built by John Tarwater. The Splawns, Tarwaters and Stephen Roberts came in January and February. In the spring James Weldon, Benedict Weldon, Humphrey Best, Daniel Devaul and his son, James R., John Stokes, Christopher Stone and his sons, James, Hardin, Robert and Wil- ham and John Edward followed.

In 1831, many settlers came in. The following settled on Honey and Marrowbone Creeks: Josiah and Jesse Morin, Thomas Edwards, Lewis Linville, Philip Covington and Elisha B. Creekmore. Not far away lived Andrew McHaney and Meriwether T. Green, Jacob S. Rogers, L. Brookshier, William Runnels, Thomas Auberry and William Morgan also came in 1831. Rogers settled below the mouth of Honey Creek and had a ferry. The others of those last named settled east of the river not far from the Splawns, Edwards and others. Robert P. Peniston, Sr., and his son, William P. came to the county in 1831. The family had come out from Kentucky the year before and had settled in Ray County. Mr. Peniston, after visiting this county, was so favorably impressed that he decided to locate on the site afterwards known as Millport. The rest of the family were Robert P., Jr., Thomas, Francis and Theodore. From 1831 to 1833, Benjamin Sampson, Elijah Frost, H. W. Enyart, Benjamin Vasser, William Prewett, Benjamin Burns, Wiley Cope and family, Russell and Solomon Frazier, Jerry Burns and John McCully all settled in what later became Grindstone Township, now Marion and Benton Townships. Adam Black located in Jamesport Township.

The first settlement in Benton Township was in 1833. Benjamin Sampson came from Tennessee and settled on the western side of the township — about a mile from the county line. Later in the year H. W. Enyart came, locating a little over a mile from Mr. Sampson. During the winter and the following spring Benjamin and Jerry Burns, John McCully, Charles and Isaac Burns and John Githens, all natives of Kentucky, located in the township. Mr. Enyart taught the first school and built the first loom used in the township. Liberty and later St. Joseph were the principal trading points of these settlers.

Colfax Township was first settled by Mormons in 1836. Practically nothing is known of settlements made there prior to 1840. Probably the first settlers after the Mormons were James, Joseph and Edward Wood, all of whom came from Kentucky in 1839. Abner Osborn, from Indiana, soon followed. Benjamin Rowell, from New York, came in 1840 and located on the south side of Marrowbone Creek. In 1841 John Castor, a soldier in the war of 1812, came from Ohio. He had seven sons, who also became citizens of this township. Other pioneers in this locality were the Kelsos, Rev. Jeremiah Lenhart, Ira Hulette, Luther Cole, Jesse Osborn, and James Drake, all of whom came in 1841 and 1842. Camden was the chief trading point for these settlers, with Richmond and occasionally Liberty receiving a share of the trade.

The first settler in Grand River Township was Solomon Tetherow, who came in the spring of 1831. There is some doubt as to whether Mr. Tetherow or John Splawn built the first cabin in the county. William Bowman, the first sheriff of the county, came a few weeks afterwards. In 1833 John Tarwater and his wife, Nancy Tarwater, located in this township, but had lived at another point in the county prior to that time. John Martin and his wife came in 1833, Adam Black in 1834, John Roland, Alfred Coots and James O’Dell in 1835. Richmond and Liberty were the chief trading points of these settlers.

1831 marks the first settlement in what is now Harrison Township, Eli Wilson and Benedict Weldon came first, both from Tennessee. Nicholas and Elijah Trosper, Thomas Reed and Manuel Martin, all Kentuckians, came soon afterwards. Obediah Ramsbottom, another of the pioneer settlers of this township, was a native of England. Jackson Township had as its first permanent resident Robert P. Peniston, who built a cabin there in 1833. Daniel Girdner, John Oxford and Robert McHaney also staked out claims there. All of these settlers were from Kentucky. The first loom in the township was owned by Mrs. John Oxford. Thomas Auberry was the first settler in Jamesport Township. Prior to his coming to Daviess County in 1834, he had been a resident in Ray County and had laid out the town of Richmond. He is described as being "a preacher, doctor, farmer, horse-trader, horse-racer, surveyor," and "could play at cards so as to come out ahead about as often as his opponent." Settlers came slowly to this section of the county — they preferred the timber to the prairie.

In 1837 and 1838 a number of Virginians came in James Callison, Richard Hill, John McClung and Robert Miller. Isaac Jordin, James C. Hill and others came within a short tme. Jefferson was one of the first townships to attract homeseekers. Anderson Smith, a native of Tennessee, and his wife came from Clay County in 1834. Judge Henderson and John Owings, came the same year. During the next two years John Higgins, Elijah Armstrong and Wiley Cope, all from Tennessee, became residents of the township. William M. Prewett and John Smith were the first settlers in Liberty Township. They came in the spring of 1834. H. W. and Elisha Creekmore, Tobias Miller and T. P. Gilreath came a few months later. All but John Smith were Kentuckians, although several of them resided in other counties in Missouri before coming to Daviess County. During the first two years the settlers had to go to Richmond or Liberty to have their grain ground. A few years later a mill was built on the border of DeKalb County and the longer journeys were no longer necessary.

Lincoln Township was settled comparatively late, John Williams, who came in 1837, being the first resident. Mrs. Sarah Williams soon settled in the same section. Reuben Macy and Thomas Brown followed in 1838. All came from Kentucky. Peter Bear, a native of Ohio, came in March, 1839, and John Mikels, a native of Kentucky but for a time a resident of Indiana, come the same month. Other pioneer settlers were William and Berg Shirley, from Indiana, Jacob Brown, from Ohio, and Joseph Everly, originally from Pennsylvania but more recently a resident of Indiana. David and James Brown came to this county in 1832 and settled in what later became Marion Township. Ebenezer Fields, Thomas Pennington and a few others came in 1833. Before 1838 Rebecca Clevenger, David Groomer, Taylor McCulley, William Roper and Elijah Frost had become residents of the township. The majority of these settlers came from Kentucky. Asa, Ross and Henry Vanover, also from Kentucky, came in 1838. Mrs. Rebecca Clevenger and Mrs. William Roper were especially noted for their skill in weaving.

Many of the early settlers of Monroe Township have already been mentioned. Hardin Stone, Samuel McDow, John Stokes, and William Stone came in 1833. The next year Andrew McHaney, M. Wilson, T. B. Blakely, George Hemry, B. Osborn, Elijah Foley, William Splawn and others arrived. The Stones were from the Carolinas, McHaneys from Virginia and the Stokes from Kentucky.

The first residents of Salem Township were Jonathan and Alexander Liggett, natives of Tennessee, who came in 1837. A short time later Aurelius Richardson, A. G. Dergin and Matthew Harboard settled in the vicinity of where Coffey is now located. John Severe came in 1841 and built a water-mill at the Rocky Ford on Cypress Creek.

In 1833 James McCreary preempted a piece of land in what is now Sheridan Township. E. Mann and several others whose names are not known, came the same year, Isaac Splawn, Benjamin Rowell, E. Kelso, Charles McGee, Nathan Marsh, Anthony Mullins, E. Hulett, and A. McMurtry came the following year. In 1840 the McMurtrys, John, Joseph, George and Samuel, brothers of A. McMurtry, came from Tennessee. George and Reuben Noah, from Ohio, became residents the same year. Richard Woodress, Dr. Samuel Venable, Thomas Kries, were also among the 1840 immigrants.

The first settlement in Union Township was made in 1831. In 1830 a hunting party from Ray County made up of John Stone, John Stokes, Daniel Devaul, Wyman Vanderpool, Thomas Linville and two others, had been so well pleased with the country that they staked out claims in 1831. The Splawns, Creekmores, Penistons and others came in 1831, 1832, and 1833. Millport was located in Union Township, and as a trading center tended to attract residents to that section of the county. The location of the county seat in Union Township also tended to give it a lead. Other settlers who came prior to 1840 were John A. Williams, Thomas W. Jacobs, Thomas Clingan, William C. Atkinson, Jacob Stollings, Lewis J. Dodd, Philip Covington, and Marshall K. Howell.

John Williams, a native of North Carolina and James Munn, of Kentucky, settled in the northern part of Washington Township in 1836. D. Nelson Foster and his wife came in 1838 from Franklin County, Indiana, and William Taylor from Kentucky.

A glance over the first few pages of this chapter shows that the overwhelming majority of the early settlers were from south of the Ohio River and of the Mason and Dixon line. A few were from Indiana and Ohio, but practically none were from New England or the Central Atlantic states. Upon examining the sketches of pioneers written by John F. Jordin in his "Memoirs," all except one of the subjects came from Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina. The McCues, Prices, Jordins, Surges, Gillilans, Hills, Drummonds and Callisons were from Virginia; the Blakelys, Penistons and Ballingers from Kentucky, the Oxfords from North Carolina, and the Dinsmores from Tennessee. At a later date the character of the population became more cosmopolitan. In the history of the county published in 1882, sketches of 395 Daviess County citizens are given. Classifying them according to the place of birth, the following is obtained.

  • Missouri 79, or 20%
  • Virginia 74 or 18.98%
  • Ohio 55, or 13.94%
  • Illinois 40, or 10.12%
  • Kentucky 33, or 8.36%
  • Indiana 23, or 5.82%
  • Foreign 19, or 4.89%
  • Pennsylvania 16, or 4.05%
  • Tennessee 14, or 3.55%
  • Maryland 10, or 2.53%

Five were from Vermont, three from Wisconsin, eight from North Carolina, four from New York, four from Iowa, one each from Alabama, Delaware, Michigan, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Mississippi, two from New Jersey. Of those of foreign birth, nine were from England, four from Canada, five from Germany, four from Ireland, and one from Scotland.

By taking the same group and eliminating those who came to the county after 1860 a much larger percentage is found to have come from the Southern states. Of the 395, only 192 came to the county before that date and the chart then stands:

  • Virginia 55, or 26.65%
  • Kentucky 26, or 13.52%
  • Ohio 26, or 13.52%
  • Indiana 20, or 10.41%
  • Tennessee 11, or 5.72%
  • Missouri 17, or 8.85%
  • North Carolina 9, or 4.69%
  • Pennsylvania 3, or 3.65%
  • Illinois 7, or 3.65%
  • Maryland 6, or 3.13%

In the latter group nearly 54% were from the Southern states as against 37% in the first group. In neither group was an attempt made to separate residents from Virginia and West Virginia. Most of them came before the separation of West Virginia, and the biographies frequently did not state the location in the state from which the subject came. It is interesting to note that a great many of those who were born in Ohio and Indiana were of Virginia stock. The parents came from Virginia, stopped in one of these states for a number of years, and then moved on to Missouri, While the 395 used as a study was only a small part of the population, it is probably large enough to be fairly representative of the county. A similar study now would probably show a larger percentage born in Missouri, and a greater number born in the adjoining states of Illinois and Iowa.

HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES, MISSOURI. DAVIESS COUNTY BY JOHN C. LEOPARD AND BUEL LEOPARD. ILLUSTRATED. HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, TOPEKA— INDIANAPOLIS. 1922

Indian Wars in Daviess County

An historical account of the Black Hawk War and the Heatherly War in Daviess County.

An historical account of the Black Hawk War and the Heatherly War in Daviess County.

Black Hawk War — Settlers had just begun to come into what is now Daviess County when all of North Missouri was aroused over the threatened attack of Indians under Chief Black Hawk, In the fall of 1831, many of the settlers took their families back nearer the Missouri River where the county was more thickly populated and better protection was offered, in case of attack by the Indians. It is said that Daniel Devaul when the first alarm came announced his intention of staying and seeing the thing through. He made a very heavy door to replace the thin slab one, and cut holes through which to shoot. A few of the neighbors decided to stand by him and the Devaul cabin was arranged to withstand the seige. About this time a second alarm came, conditions seemed much more terrifying. Mr. Devaul and his two friends decided not to risk their lives any longer and followed the neighbors to a place of safety. Some of the pioneers who did not leave the county built a block house surrounded by palisades near a spring on the old John Merritt farm. Scouts were sent out and every one was ready for business if the Indians appeared. But there was no need for alarm as the Indians who sometimes visited the county were very peaceably inclined. A company of rangers was organized in Ray County by Colonel Skouts and many young men living within the boundaries of the present Daviess County joined the company. Among them were Hardin Stone, Theodore Peniston and Milford Donaho. Maj. McGee relates this incident which occured while the men were in service: "It was while scouting at the head waters of the Chariton river that the rangers met a company from Howard County on a similar warlike mission. During the meeting the question of markmanship came up and a shooting match was arranged between the two companies. A Mr. Josiah Davis was selected by the Howard County boys to show Daviess County youngsters how to handle shooting irons while the gallant hunter and ranger Milford Donaho was selected as the Ray and Daviess County representative to show the Howard County boys that while they could hold a full hand at brag, when it came to a sharp eye and a steady hand the rangers were at home to all comers. It was reported a close match, but Mr. Donaho was declared the winner." The Indian War was soon over and with the danger removed the settlers soon began to return and many others came with them.

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The Heatherly War — What is usually styled the "Heatherly War" is important chiefly because of the excitement it created in the northwestern counties. A family by the name of Heatherly lived in what is now Grundy County on Medicine river. With them were four men, Thomas, Watkins, Hawkins and a colored man. All were regarded as rather desprate characters.. In 1836 they were organized into a regular horse-stealing band, and made raids wherever there was any chance of meeting with success. In the fall of that year they took horses from a man by the name of Dunbar and his companion. Both men were killed trying to defend their property. The character of the Heatherly gang being pretty well known, they were under the necessity of doing something to divert suspicion. They therefore invented the story that the Indians, the lowas and the Sacs, were on the warpath, scalping and killing and burning the homes of the settlers. Any mention of an attack by the Indians was terrifying to the settlers and they had visions of whole armies of savages pouring in upon them. The inhabitants at Moore’s and Thompson’s settlements assembled. Those at Moore’s hastily built a block house. The militia was ordered out by General Thompson, two companies were ordered out from Ray, and two from Clay, a number joining from Daviess and Livingston. It was soon learned that it was a false alarm and the settlers determined to find out the cause. It was soon traced to the Heatherly gang, who had stated that Indians had been murdering. The bodies of the two men were found in the river. Detection being practically certain, Hawkins, one of the gang, turned state’s evidence. The gang was sent to the penitentiary.

HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES, MISSOURI. DAVIESS COUNTY BY JOHN C. LEOPARD AND BUEL LEOPARD. ILLUSTRATED. HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, TOPEKA— INDIANAPOLIS. 1922

Telephone Emerged in Daviess County in 1901

The Daviess County Telephone Company (DCTC) was originally incorporated Jan. 15, 1901, with 200 shares of common stock at $25 par value. An additional 400 shares at the same par value were authorized Jan. 7, 1913. Mr. Penn Love, phone #400 office and #240 residence, ran the DCTC and records of outside services contracted for by him from 1910-11. A city ordinance of Gallatin dated Feb. 6,1905, authorized a telephone system in Gallatin by this company.

The Daviess County Telephone Company (DCTC) was originally incorporated Jan. 15, 1901, with 200 shares of common stock at $25 par value. An additional 400 shares at the same par value were authorized Jan. 7, 1913. Mr. Penn Love, phone #400 office and #240 residence, ran the DCTC and records of outside services contracted for by him from 1910-11. A city ordinance of Gallatin dated Feb. 6,1905, authorized a telephone system in Gallatin by this company.

Gallatin had magneto (crank) phones until Dec. 29, 1956, when dial service was first installed. In 1905, crank phone service was $1 per month for residences and $1.60 per month for business wall phones. Desk phones were available for 25 cents per month. Gallatin was paid a franchise fee of $25 per year. In 1911 the business wall phone rate was increased to $2 per month.

Starting in 1916, officers of the DCTC were President Penn Love, Vice President Charles Hemry, and Secretary/Treasurer H.Y. Tarwater, phone #300 office nad #214 residence. In 1917 W.C. Gillihan, phone #64, replaced Mr. Hemry as vice president.

DCTC was reorganized Oct. 1, 1921, and E.O. Turner was president and general manager. Te other officers were from St. Louis and they included E.F. Carter, vice president; J.P. Crowley, secretary; and R.A. Nicherson, treasurer. This reorganized company was purchased by the Inter-County Telephone Company (ICTC) in 1927. The new general manager was Joe M. Roberts of Maysville, who moved his family to Gallatin in 1929. Mr. Roberts moved to Columbia in 1963 and was president of the company at that time. It was later renamed the Missouri Telephone Company.

In May, 1929, ICTC purchased the Gallatin Trust Company building for $7,000 from Chrles and Carrie Kanuer. ICTC owned several phone exchanges in and around Daviess County at that time and ran them from Gallatin.

In 1929 the phone rates were as follows: rural service $1 per month, rural busienss $2 per month, city business $3 per month, and $1 for additional extensions. The city one-party residence rate was $1.75 a month and 50 cents for an extension. The rural residence rate, one party, was $1.65 a month and a party line of five or more parties was 65 cents a month. The above charges were made once per year in March and had to be paid in advance.

Some interesting phone numbers for Gallatin from a 1904 phone book are: D.H. Davis and sons #3, Democrat office #10, county clerk’s office #30, J.W. Alexander #29, McClasky Barn #20, U.S. Express Company #207, J.H. Townsend #2, Wabash Depot #4, Wabash Hotel #236, Windson Hotel #11, Woodruff Hotel #72, Wes L. Robertson residence #0, Dr. C.O. Netherton #1, North Missourian #12.

There may also be interest in who didn’t have a phone number in this 1904 book. The city clerk had one (#206) but the city police and the county sheriff’s office did not. The Rock Island Depot had no phone and none were losted for the school, fire department, nor for the post office. Sheriff Robert McCray had a residence phone (#122).

Written by David Stark, Gallatin, published in March, 1994, in the Gallatin North Missourian; researched from information provided by the Missouri Telephone Association.