D.L. Kost — Founder of the Gallatin North Missourian

David L. Kost published the first issue of the Gallatin North Missourian in September, 1864, assisted at that time by B.J. Waters. Mr. Waters remained with the paper only six months, selling his interest to Mr. Kost who edited the paper alone until 1868 when Jehiel T. Day formed a partnership agreement with him. Kost later died at his home in Gentry, Arkansas, at the age of 90.

David L. Kost published the first issue of the Gallatin North Missourian in September, 1864, assisted at that time by B.J. Waters. Mr. Waters remained with the paper only six months, selling his interest to Mr. Kost who edited the paper alone until 1868 when Jehiel T. Day formed a partnership agreement with him. Kost later died at his home in Gentry, Arkansas, at the age of 90.

Founding publisher David Kost was born at Mt. Vernon, Ohio, on Feb. 18, 1835. He taught school when he was 17 years old, graduated from law school at Oberlin, Ohio, at age 21, and served in the Civil War as secretary to the general of the 65th Ohio, Company H. He was involved in several battles and contracted an absess caused by extreme exposure and was discharged after 11 months of service.

Kost was state representative once and a state senator twice while living in Daviess County, MO. He spent the last 12 years of his life at Gentry, Ark., where he was the editor of Gentry’s second newspaper while also farming. Kost was the father of four: Paul and Victor of Chicago; Byrdie of Cleveland; and Nona May of Gentry.

In an article commemorating the newspaper’s 65th anniversary, the following was published: “The Missourian is one of the oldest business institutions in Daviess County and is proud of its record. It is also a service institution, and thru all the years has endeavored to merit approval by striving to serve in the way a newspaper should. Canvassing the very earliest files of the paper back in the 1860s, we find the editor taking a decided stand for the building of railroads in the county and urging the people of the county to assume the responsibility of seeing that the railroads were built as the welfare and progress of its citizens depended upon improved transportation facilities. And such has been the course of the Missourian, at all times sponsoring and encouraging what was considered would be of benefit to the people, and serving as a newspaper duty.

“The Missourian has had a long and honorable career, and many of the paper’s editors were men of strong character and outstanding ability. Ed W. Howe, the famous Kansas philosopher, worked on the Missourian when a young man, and in a recent article “Plaine People” now running in the Saturday Evening Post, Mr. Howe tells of his printing office experiences on the Missourian, and pays compliment to both Mr. and Mrs. Kost in whose home he lived while working on the paper.”

Those succeeding Kost as publisher of the Gallatin North Missourian include Judge Jehiel T. Day, Col. W.T. Sullivan, Robert Harrah, Robert Selby, D.H. Gilchrist and, in 1899, C.M. Harrison whose son, Scout, followed. The newspaper was in the Harrison family for decades, save a period of about four years when it was published by S.G. McDowell and sons. Scout Harrison operated the newspaper for nearly 20 years before Joseph and Katherine Snyder purchased the newspaper in the 1950s. Then Darryl and Elizabeth Wilkinson joined the Snyders in 1978, taking minority interest and eventually full ownership in the 1980s.

Taken from a death notice Aug. 18, 1925; and from an anniversary article published in the Gallatin North Missourian on Sept. 13, 1925.

The printing shop of the Gallatin North Missourian and Gallatin Democrat in May, 1908. Publisher Robert Ball is standing far right. The skylight and cellar door (lower right) makes this photo appear to have been taken from the back towards the storefront (from east, looking west) at 205 North Main Street. The public office then would have been on the other side of the doorway shown.
For many years commercial printing was performed on this printing press in the offices of the Gallatin Democrat and Gallatin North Missourian. It was so heavy the press was posiioned over a solid cement floor by the back window. The main operator was Arthur Daugherty. This is a press by Chandler & Price Company of Cleveland, Ohio. During remodeling and changes in printing technologies while Joseph Snyder was owner/publisher, it is thought that this press was donated for museum display at Arrow Rock, MO, a museum operated by the Missouri Press Association Foundation. (date unknown)

Jerry Litton — Promising Future Abruptly Ended

Jerry Litton (1937-1976), along with his wife and two children, died in a plane crash on Primary Election night, Aug. 3, 1976, at Chillicothe Municipal Airport. Also killed in the crash were Paul Rupp, Jr., and his son, Paul Rupp III. The tragedy affected many people throughout Northwest Missouri, leaving an emptiness and void in the minds of those who believed in the vision Litton described for America’s future. The following tribute was written in the record of the board meeting of the Bank of Gallatin on Aug. 11, 1976, with copies delivered to Jerry’s parents, Charley and Mildred Litton, and other relatives and friends.

Jerry Litton (1937-1976), along with his wife and two children, died in a plane crash on Primary Election night, Aug. 3, 1976, at Chillicothe Municipal Airport. Also killed in the crash were Paul Rupp, Jr., and his son, Paul Rupp III. The tragedy affected many people throughout Northwest Missouri, leaving an emptiness and void in the minds of those who believed in the vision Litton described for America’s future. The following tribute was written in the record of the board meeting of the Bank of Gallatin on Aug. 11, 1976, with copies delivered to Jerry’s parents, Charley and Mildred Litton, and other relatives and friends.

Jerry Litton, 39, was born at Lock Springs in Daviess County, MO, on May 12, 1937. He went to elementary school there and later graduated from the Chillicothe High School, where he was president of the National Honor Society.

Following graduation, Jerry became a newscaster at radio station KCHI in Chillicothe, after serving as president of the Missouri chapter of Future Farmers of America. Later he was elected national secretary of the FFA, and traveled to many states on speaking engagements before trade conventions, at business organizations and professional groups.

Jerry entered Missouri University at Columbia, where he was graduated in January, 1961, with a bachelor’s degree in agriculture journalism. He and Sharon Summervile of Chillicothe were married in 1959, while students at Columbia.

While at the university, Jerry worked as a newscaster at a Columbia radio station and as a newspaper reporter and farm editor. During his sophomore year he was elected vice-president of the student body; he was also named to the Mystical Seven for scholastic achievement and leadership; and he was Missouri chairman of students at MU for Kennedy and Johnson and national co-chairman of youth for Kennedy. Jerry was president of Young Democrats at MU, national chairman of "Youth for Symington" and served four years on the congressional campaign committee of Congressman W.R. Hull.

After graduation from the university, the Littons returned to Chillicothe where they were members of the Presbyterian Church and took up farming as a livelihood. Jerry joined his father, Charley Litton, in a farming partnership, and persuaded the members to invest in Charolais cattle, a new French breed. The partnership succeeded from the beginning, and prospered financially in a big way. The Littons sold Charolais cattle in many countries and soon earned a fine reputation, both national and international, as cattle breeders.

After Congressman Hull announced his retirement, Jerry became a candidate for Congress in 1972, in the 6th District of Missouri. He was tireless in his campaigning efforts. He had confidence and faith in an informed electorate. He made things happen according to plan. People voted for Jerry because of his intelligence, faith and emphasis on issues. He won confidence and support of many persons, both young and old, who soon became his devoted supporters, remaining loyal to him throughout all remaining political campaigns. He seemed destined to succeeed and for leadership from the beginning. He was elected by a large majority of votes.

One remembers the refrain "Don’t let the stars get into your eyes," but Jerry rejected it. He had stars in his eyes and dreams in his heart.

Following his election to Congress, the Litton ranch was sold and the assets placed in a blind trust. In his first term in Congress he quickly gained national attention as a progressive leader who could make things happen. He surrounded himself with young, capable and energetic people. He soon established a monthly television program called "Dialogue with Litton," in an effort to bring government closer to the people. He invited many nationally known leaders to appear on this program.

Litton was re-elected to Congress in 1974 by taking 79% of the votes from his district. He had an abundance of energy, action and resolution at all times. He made dreams come true. Jerry was able to capture the heart, mind and loyalty of his friends and followers. His friends and supporters were devoted to him.

Speculation arose almost as soon as he entered Congress of his becoming a U.S. Senator at an early date. Jerry dreamed of it, too. Jerry had a loyal and devoted following throughout the 6th District, consisting of 23 counties in Northwest Missouri, constituting about 20% of rural Missouri. This provided him a very strong base from which to campaign for the Senate.

After careful planning and at a meeting of a large number of persons at Columbia in early 1976, Jerry revealed a campaign plan that involved a careful and intense blend of television and radio advertising with a personal organization that would capture the state and Missourians for him by primary day. He relied heavily on the media of TV and radio, money, supporters, volunteers, workers and plane. He planned to spend more than a million dollars to achieve his goal. He announced his candidacy to the Senate at Columbia on Feb. 22, 1976.

Jerry had a personal political working organization in about 100 counties. He enlisted more than 2,000 volunteers for making telephone calls. He soon realized the importance of establishing his candidacy in the St. Louis area and also southeast Missouri. He set a goal of 20%, but actually received about 24% of the vote there. He carried 96 counties and was second in all other counties, except the county and city of St. Louis.

He served a blitz in St. Louis in April by TV and radio followed in late May with "Meet Me in St. Louis" of numerous volunteers and workers from all over the state coming to St. Louis to campaign for him there from door to door.

Let’s look at a day of Jerry’s campaigning. It is Monday, the last day before the primary election. He left his home about 9 a.m. and went to St. Louis; from there to Kansas City; from there to Joplin; from there to Springfield; from there to Cape Girardeau; from there to Columbia; and from there back to Kansas City to appear at Starlight Theatre to shake hands with the audience dispersing about 11 p.m. After more campaigning and business, he returned to his home about 3 a.m. primary election morning. 

How do you beat a campaigner like him? Who could beat Jerry Litton in a political contest? When I attempt to appraise the life of Jerry Litton, I think of the poet’s description of Mt. Fuji, when he says "The clouds themselves can hardly climb its height; the birds but skirt its side in soaring flight…"

After a busy primary election day with victory achieved, Jerry and his family, with the Rupps, entered the plane at Chillicothe about 8:30 p.m., heading for Kansas City, when the crash occurred.

Death came to him in the hour of his greatest triumph. He was destined for national and world leadership. Jerry Litton would have reached the Senate in the fifth year of his political life, but for fate. Like the ocean he is greater than all our descriptions of him. He reached above and beyond the timberline of the mountains. To such as he there is no successor.

Jerry knew that success in life consists in knowing how to change men’s minds. Jerry was not sectional, but cosmopolitan; he was neither north nor south, east nor west, but a typical Missourian of the great center state of Missouri.

How do you say farewell to a sleek, elegant and graceful ocean queen like the SS France that has carried a million passengers across the Atlantic and retires for no fault of her own, but by the high cost of fuel oil? (She too, is a casualty)

How do we say farewell to Jerry Litton?

I quote the famous lines of Lawrence Binyon:

"Jerry shall not grow old as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary him nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we shall remember him."

Reprinted from a phamphlet prepared for the Bank of Gallatin by Gallatin Publishing Company, written into the bank board’s minutes on Aug. 11, 1976

Local Historian David Stark

Many of the stories researched and shared on this web site originated with the writings of David Stark of Gallatin. Here’s a brief sketch of a Daviess Countian you should know.

Many of the stories researched and shared on this web site originated with the writings of David Stark of Gallatin. Here’s a brief sketch of a Daviess Countian you should know.

David Stark was born in Daviess County in 1935 and is of the sixth generation of the county. His great-grandfather, Jim Bristow, was in Gallatin when the town was laid out in 1837; Bristow purchased lots in the new town in 1838. David’s parents were teachers.

Mr. Stark is a Korean War veteran and a retired member of the U.S. Army after 25 years of military service. He graduated from Gallatin High School in 1954 and returned to reside in Gallatin in 1974. He graduated from Northwest Missouri State at Maryville, MO, and became a CPA at Arlington, VA, in 1967, working mostly with federal government finance.

In 1968 Stark became a foreign service officer and served five years at the American Embassy in Saigon, Vietnam. He made a world circling trip in 1970, researched family records in Scotland, and visited Expo ’70 in Japan.

From 1974 to the present, David has been busy studying world history and advances in science. Other activities include family history, county history, shooting sports, and Missouri law enforcement.

Published May, 2004.

They Served During World War I

The following is a list of names of Daviess County boys were killed in action, died of wounds or sickenss in France and in camps, or were injured in the service of our country during World War I:

The following is a list of names of Daviess County boys were killed in action, died of wounds or sickenss in France and in camps, or were injured in the service of our country during World War I:

KILLED IN ACTION

Francis V. Frazier, Altamont
William Seiler, Gallatin
Wallace McAfee, Gallatin
Stanley Benard, Pattonsburg
Charles A. Shaw, Pattonsburg
Ray Noll, Jamesport
John Tracy, Coffey
Robert Adkinson, Gallatin
Martin Conaway
John Whetstone

DIED OF DISEASE

Wilford Smith, A.E.F., Jameson
Daniel Collier, Jamesport
Alexander Dowell, Jamesport
Francis McCray, Jamesport
Virgil Utz, Pattonsburg
Bert Ayers, Gallatin
Oather Lukehart, Gallatin
Earl Weist, A.E.F., Gallatin
Lloyd Biddle, Gallatin
William Robinson, Gallatin
Joseph Linville, Gallatin
Earl Weist, A.E.F., Jameson
Emmett Downs, Weatherby
Elmer Oak, Winston
George Hudson, Winston

WOUNDED

Charles McLaughlin, Gallatin
Frank Stapleton, Gallatin
Roy Stephenson, Gallatni
Charles W. Graham, Gallatin
Evan Edwards, Gallatin
Homer Venable, Gallatin
Hemry Ramsbottom, Gallatin
Lloyd Welden, Gallatin
Leroy Spidle, Gallatin
Samuel Graham, Gallatin
Charles Plymell, Coffey
Ora Butcher, Pattonsburg
Frank J. Brown, Jameson
Eddie Earl Smith, Jamesport
Lee Goodbar, Jamesport
Hobart Brown, Jamesport
Clyde Robinson, Jamesport
Ronald A. Ginder, Jameson
E.F. Stephenson, Altamont
John Swofford, Gallatin
Homer Lummon, Gallatin
Clarence Morris, Gallatin

Reprinted from the Gallatin Democrat, Jan 24, 1917

Conrad Burns — Montana’s 19th U.S. Senator

Auctioneer, broadcaster, county commissioner, football referee, livestock fieldman and Marine, Conrad Burns became Montana’s 19th United States Senator on Jan. 3, 1989.

Auctioneer, broadcaster, county commissioner, football referee, livestock fieldman and Marine, Conrad Burns became Montana’s 19th United States Senator on Jan. 3, 1989.

In 1988, Burns defeated incumbent Senator John Melcher by a 52 to 48 percent margin, becoming only the second Republican Senator ever elected from his state. He was the only Republican chalenger to defeat an incumbent that year.

Prior to his election as the first Republican Senator from Montana since 1953, Burns served as Yellowstone County Commissioner for two years. Yellowstone County is Montana’s most populous county. He was a farm and ranch news reporter for a Billings television station before creating the Northern Ag Network in 1975 with four radio stations. By 1986, when he sold his interest in the network, it served 31 radio and six television stations in Montana and Wyoming.

Burns was born on a small farm near Gallatin, MO, on Jan. 25, 1935, to Russell and Mary Frances (Knight) Burns. Both of his parents, now over 80, still live near the family farm. His mother was active in politics as a county chairman and state committeewoman for the Democratic Party. Burns attended Pleasant Grove, a country grade school. He graduated from Gallatin High School in 1952.

After two years in the College of Agriculture at the University of Missouri, Burns enlisted in the Marine Corps where he was a small arms instructor and served in the Far East. He then worked for TWA and Ozark airlines for three years. In 1962, he became a field representative for Polled Hereford World Magazine and moved to Billings, MT. He married Phyllis Kuhlmann of North Platte, NE, in 1967. She graduated from Concordia Teacher College in Seward, NE, and was a teacher at Trinity Lutheran Grade School in Billings from 1966 to 1970. Burns was named the first manager of a Billings livestock show in 1968 and became involved in radio and television broadcasting of agricultural market news while working for Billigns Livestock Commission.

Burns serves on three Senate committees: Commerce, Science and Transportation; Energy and National Resources; and Small Business. Although he’s 99th in seniority, Burns has positioned himself to help his state by gaining a top position on key subcommitteees on each committee.

As the senior Republican on the Foreign Commerce and Tourism Subcommittee, Burns is positioned to help the future economic growth of tourism, Montana’s second leading industry and employer and to promote Montana’s products overseas.

The two other Commerce Subcommittees Burns serves on area Surface Transportation and Communications. He hopes to use this slot to improve transportation in Montana and the nation. Burns expects to use his background as a radio and television broadcaster to help broadcasting and telecommunications industries grow.

In an effort to have an immediate voice on water rights issues that affect the western United States, Burns gained the top Republican position on the Water and Power Subcommittee of the Senate Energy Committee. Finding alternative methods of storing water for later use will be a priority for Burns on this subcommittee. He understands the important role adequate supplies of clean water play in the future of his state and the nation.

Burns also serves on the Public Lands, National Parks and Forests Subcommittee. A new Montana Wilderness Bill will fall under the jurisdiction of this subcommittee. The Energy Research and Development Subcommittee membership gives Burns a say in energy policy decisions that affect the future of Montana’s coal, natural gas and oil reserves.

On the Small Business Committee, Burns is the top Republican on the Urban and Minority Owned Business Development Subcommittee, which Burns hopes to use to improve the small business climate for minorities including native Americans. Burns, who was raised on a family farm and has strong agricultural roots, will also serve on the Rural Economy and Family Farming Subcommittee.

Burns has been appointed Vice Chairman of the United States Group of the Interparliamentary Union (IPU) and as a member of the Military Academy Board of the Army for West Point.

Senator and Mrs. Burns are parents of a daughter, Keely, a 19-year-old sophomore pre-med student at Montanan State University, and a son, Garrett, a 14-year-old ninth grader. The Burns are Lutherans.

Burns is also known as a humorous speaker. By poking fun at himself, he hopes to show that politicians should not take themselves too seriously, but should take their jobs seriously. An example is his observation: “We all do dumb things 15 minutes a day. The key is not to go over your quota!”

Press release by Bryce Dustman (a Daviess Countian) for Senator Burns on Oct. 4, 1990

Admiral Richard H. Cruzen — A Biography

Admiral Richard H. Cruzen (1897-1970) was a graduate of Gallatin High School and became one of Gallatin’s most decorated sons. During his exciting military career including polar explorations, he received many decorations including the Legion of Merit, the Atlantic Fleet Clasp, the Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medal, the Yangtze Service Medal, the American Defense Service Medal, the Fleet Clasp, the American Area Campaign Medal, Philippine iberation Ribbon with two bronze stars, and World War II Victory Medal. But Admiral Cruzen is best known for his exploration of the Antarctic.

Admiral Richard H. Cruzen (1897-1970) was a graduate of Gallatin High School and became one of Gallatin’s most decorated sons. During his exciting military career including polar explorations, he received many decorations including the Legion of Merit, the Atlantic Fleet Clasp, the Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medal, the Yangtze Service Medal, the American Defense Service Medal, the Fleet Clasp, the American Area Campaign Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon with two bronze stars, and World War II Victory Medal. But Admiral Cruzen is best known for his exploration of the Antarctic.

Capt. Richard H. Cruzen, USN, commander of Task Force Sixty Eight, the task force which made the U.S. Navy’s 1947 Antarctic Expedition. The native of Gallatin, MO, later achieved the rank of Admiral. [Official USN photography, filed June 25, 1946; #702828]
Richard H. Cruzen was born on April 28, 1897. After graduating from Gallatin High School in Gallatin, MO, he attended the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, VA, and the Severn School in Severna Park, MD. He was then appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy.

As a young midshipman, Cruzen served abord the USS Mississippi, operating with the Atlantic Fleet during the summer of 1918. A year later, he graduated from the Naval Academy and was commissioned an ensign. Being advanced in rank to lieutenant on June 7, 1925, Cruzen served in various capacities with the U.S. Navy and was then promoted to lieutenant commander on Oct. 1, 1935, commander on April 1, 1941, captain on June 20, 1942, and finally to rear admiral on April 1, 1944.

Between the years of 1925 and 1937 Richard Cruzen served aboard several cruisers, battleships, and destroyers including the Idaho, the Claxton, the Navada, the Rigel, the Delphy, the Sinclair, the Shirk, the Elliott, the Pope, the Simpson, and the California.

Cruzen’s next assignment, as commander of the 65-year-old barkentine name the Bear, took him into the stormy Atlantic ice pack. From 1939 to 1941 he was with the U.S. Antarctic Service Expedition, second in command to Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, the veteran explorer who led the government financed expedition in search of geographical and scientific data.

According to a Navy report, 1,000 miles of new coastline was discovered on exploratory trips by the Bear and Byrd’s sea plane. Commended by Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox for his “superior seamanship, ability, courage, determination, efficiency and good judgment in dangerous emergencies,” Cruzen was one of the 16 members of the 1939-41 expedition who received the Antarctic Expedition Medal, presented in November 1946.

On Dec. 2, 1946, Cruzen once more set sail for the Antarctic continent. This time, as Task Force Commander under Admiral Byrd of the Navy’s Antarctic Developments Project, also known as “Operation High Jump,” Cruzen led a force of 13 ships carrying some 4,000 men, including meteorologists, zoologists, physicists, and experts from oceanographic institutes. Besides looking for new scientific data, another purpose of the expedition was to train Navy personnel and to test standard Navy ships and other euipment in cold weather operations.

Cruzen navigated through an ice pack of several hundred miles before reaching Little America. Icebergs and unpredictable weather were formidable foes during the course of this expedition. Among the discoveries made during the 1946-47 expedition was the sighting of two “oases,” one a region of ice-free lakes and land. More than 300,000 square miels of unpathed territory were charted on aerial mapping operations. Their observations proved that radical changes would have to be made on existing maps of the Antarctic.

Admiral Richard H. Cruzen died on April 15, 1970.

Researched by David Stark

Sen. Burns Clings to his Roots

Conrad Burns’ roots go back to a plain white house on a small farm on the green rolling plains of Northwest Missouri. It was here where Burns says he learned the work ethic and life’s other lessons from hard-working parents who had survived the Great Depression. His father and mother regained the family farm after his father’s family lost it during the Depression.

Conrad Burns’ roots go back to a plain white house on a small farm on the green rolling plains of Northwest Missouri. It was here where Burns says he learned the work ethic and life’s other lessons from hard-working parents who had survived the Great Depression. His father and mother regained the family farm after his father’s family lost it during the Depression.

By vast Montana standards, the Burns farm, now owned by someone else, isn’t much. “Two rocks and a dirt,” Conrad Burns recalls, half-jokingly. It’s only 180 acres, including some hills and a spring, but it was enough to support Russell and Mary Frances Burns, their two children, Conrad and younger sister Judy, and 45 registered Black Angus cattle. His mother, now 85, apologies that the farm house, which is no longer occupied, has fallen into disrepair since they sold the farm in 1974.

Conrad Burns was born in that farm house, four miles northwest of Gallatin, MO, and about an hour north of Kansas City, on Jan. 25, 1935. “He was born talking, wasn’t he?” says his aunt Georgie Morrie, when asked how Burns acquired his speaking skills.

In Missouri, hardly anyone calls him Conrad, even today. His mother, aunt and most everybody else still refer to him as Connie Burns.

Burns speaks with admiration for his parents. His father, who died in 1992, and his mother, who lives nearby in Cameron, MO, were “so pragmatic, they never ever lived in a dream world,” he says.

The Burns kids earned their keep on the farm, their mother says. Besides cattle, the family raised oats, corn, hay, hogs and chickens, and sold cream, eggs and other products throughout the year. The kids helped with the chores. “You have to have something to sell every month,” Conrad says.

Burns recalls working as a water boy, delivering drinking water to a threshing crew and pitching hay for 35 cents a day. “I can remember when Dad bought me my first 3-tine pitchfork,” Burns says, “I was 9 or 10. That was pretty big stuff.”

He learned to cultivate the fields with his father’s two mules. The farm had no tractor until 1947, no electricity until 1949, and no indoor plumbing until the mid-1950s. Times were often tough. Sometimes an orange in his stocking was the only Christmas present he got.

“Life was good,” Burns says. “I had a very happy childhood. We had no money, but we didn’t know it.

COMMENTS FROM THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL:

Here are some comments of Conrad Burns during the 1994 campaign for the U.S. Senate.

— Quoting writer P.J. O’Rourke in Rolling Stone magazine: “If you think health care is expensive now, wait until it’s free.”

— “Everybody ought to go broke once. It’s a terrible thing to say, but it’s a wonderful learning experience.”

— “We haven’t changed any, and we ain’t going to change. We’re way too old.”

— “Bureaucrats can make a lot of bad decisions, but they still get a check.”

— About the logging, mining and agricultural industries: “I don’t know how people who provide wealth are bad people.”

— About Congress: “As long as we’re not in session, the country feels pretty good, and we can’t damage ’em.”

— After his daughter told him she intended to go to law school instead of medical school: “Great. I’ll educate a doctor; I won’t educate a lawyer.” (She eventually went to medical school)

— “As far as growing up and what you did in life, I think that’s worth more than a PhD.”

— On his first speech in the U.S. Senate, which was about Montana’s statehood Centennial: “I was just squeezing the oil out of that desk. I was just shaking. Al Simpson (the Wyoming senator) said he was, to, on his first speech. He said, ‘If you weren’t like that, a lot of folks would be worrying about you.'”

— On how he enjoyed refereeing Class C football as much as Class AA, A, B and Frontier Conference football games: “In Fromberg on Friday afternoon, it’s those kids’ Super Bowl.”

— How he was described as a high school football player for the Gallatin (MO) Bulldogs: “He’s not quite big enough, but he sure is slow.”

— His late father, when showing Conrad Burns the $25 check he wrote to the doctor to deliver the future senator: “Just remember that. That’s what you’re worth. You’re not worth any more or any less than $25.”

Written by Charles S. Johnson, State Bureau Chief for the Billings Gazette, 1994

Sen. Burns’ First Day in Congress

On his first day in the U.S. Senate (101st Congress), Conrad Burns (R-Montana) kept one promise: “I’ll never take a chew under the Capitol dome.” Burns, a longtime tobacco chewer, didn’t need the brass spittoons on the Senate floor as he joined the “world’s most exclusive club.”

On his first day in the U.S. Senate (101st Congress), Conrad Burns (R-Montana) kept one promise: “I’ll never take a chew under the Capitol dome.” Burns, a longtime tobacco chewer, didn’t need the brass spittoons on the Senate floor as he joined the “world’s most exclusive club.”

The Senate, which has a Rockefeller and a Kennedy, now includes a Burns, 53, a former livestock auctioneer, farm-news broadcaster, traveling salesman and high school football referee. “I’ve done a lot of things to understand this country, and not just in a political sense,” Burns said. In fact, Burns’ political experience is two years on the Yellowstone County (Mont.) Commission.

But if he was awed, he didn’t show it. Jumping from the county budget to the federal budget is merely “a matter of bigger zeroes,” he said. Six, to be exact ($34 million vs. $1 trillion).

And his daughter, Keely, 17, may keep him in his place. As they drove from Billings, MT, to Washington, she read aloud a newspaper article about senators choosing their new desks.

It noted that Burns gets the last pick. “I thought that was really hilariouis,” Keely said.

Later, at a modest reception, Mary Burns, 79, the former Democratic Party chairwoman of Daviess County, MO, said of her son, “I don’t hold it against him for becoming a Republican.” But she added, “That Democratic raising helped him a bit …but I told him, ‘Don’t ask me to vote for (George) Bush.'”

Burns didn’t. Even senators listen to their mothers.

Written by Bob Minzesheimer, published in USA Today

Sen. Burns No Easy Mark

Gallatin native Conrad Burns is a Republican Senator from the strongly Democratic state of Montana and was seen as vulnerable in the election of 1994. But this campaign, following his freshman year in Washington, D.C., reveals much about the Missouri man serving Montana.

Gallatin native Conrad Burns is a Republican Senator from the strongly Democratic state of Montana and was seen as vulnerable in the election of 1994. But this campaign, following his freshman year in Washington, D.C., reveals much about the Missouri man serving Montana.

According to the anti-Washington gospel of the 1994 elections, Sen. Conrad Burns ought to be a sitting duck. Among the Republican incumbents, his seat once looked most vulnerable to a Democdratic gain that could balance a loss somewhere else. But on Nov. 2, just days before the election, his hard work and rich campaign treasury seem to be carrying Burns, despite a series of weaknesses that might cripple another candidate.

First, Burns won only 51 percent of the vote in 1988 in a strong Democratic state.

Second, the freshman senator’s main claim to fame is that he has taken 68 lobbyist-paid trips and has often voted the way his hosts at events such as the Kentucky Derby and the Orange Bowl would like. Then he voted to support a filibuster against a bill banning such trips.

Even The Billings Gazette, which endorsed him in an editorial Monday, said that “Burns’ propensity to sit on the lobbyists’ knees is an issue.”

Jack Mudd, a former University of Montana law school dean who is running against him, repeats that Burns is “too close to lobbyists,” as he put it in a Kiwanis Club speech Tuesday in Missoula.

Third, Burns, a conservative Republican, has made no legislative mark in Washington.

Then last month, Burns repeated a common racial epithet for blacks when he was telling of being asked by a constituent how he managed to live with all the blacks in Washington. “It’s a hell of a challenge,” he said he replied. He apologized.

When he was asked in a debate what he would do in Congress to help the minorities, he said the answer was to “live by example — it’s what we do and how we deal with those people.”

But Burns is doing fine, despite all that and despite his fractured grammar and despite clear proof of the falsity of his major television advertisement, in which he says he has never voted to increase taxes.

Burns seems about to become the first Republican ever re-elected to the Senate from Montana, the most Democratic of the Rocky Mountain states, where a strong labor tradition grew from the mines and railroads. Recent polls show him with leads of about 15 percentage points.

Mudd relishes exploring the complexities of policy in a televised debate and is unhappy that there was been only one. But both candidates say they oppose a government takeover of health care.

Burns argues for changes in insurance law, but Mudd goes further, telling small-business people they should support univeral health care because without it, “you are paying for everyone who is uninsured or underinsured.”

The Mudd campaign’s television advertisements have lacked bite. Mudd said Tuesday that his basic problem has been a lack of money to get them on the air. His campaign had collected $810,102 by Oct. 19, the last pre-election filing date. Burns raised more than $3.2 million during six years, and he voted to continue a filibuster on campaign-spending legislation, too.

But there is much more to the Burns success than money. He has campaigned hard, touring the state by bus and plane. Last Saturday he and some of his supporters made an all-day bus trip from Lewistown to Billings. He detoured to visit “a dilapidated old cowboy,” made brief speeches and greated old friends from his days as a farm broadcaster, livestock auctioneer and high school football referee.

His highly organized campaign is personal, with more than 12,000 people (1.5 percent of the state’s population) who know him, volunterring to make calls and get out the vote.

Burns’ speeches stress his opposition to taxes, gun control and a rampant environmentalism that he says puts man only equal to teh “Australian kangaroo rat.” He complains that Washington is ignorant about farming, and he rails against the decline of standards generally: “There is kids setting in classrooms with ball caps on.”

His continual presence and his manner, even his somtimes embarrassing bluntness and semi-coarse wisecracks, may explain why the lobbying issues has not crippled him. While the Mudd television ads ask, “Who is he really working for?” Burns in person just does not seem to have forgotten Montana for seductive lobbyists.

But the money helps. It pays for a field staff, for direct mail that says Mudd wants to cut Social Security and for television ads, including one showing champagne glasses clinking as Burns says that special interests press for tax increases.

“I’ve never voted for a tax increase, not one. Forty times they tried to get me to raise your taxes — Democrats tried it, Republicans tried it, and every time I voted no.”

Burns does have 40 anti-tax votes on his ledger, although some sought to carve out tax breaks for farmers and other interests. But he also voted in 1990 for a $3 tax on airline tickets and in 1993 for $15 billion in new user fees on items such as mining and patents.

Writtey by Adam Clymer, New York Times News Service, published in the Nov. 2, 1994 edition of The Oregonian

Busy Bertie Brown

To reach the age of 80 these days is not unusual. However, to reach that mark in a lifetime and still be healthy and active in civic organizations is quite a blessing. This is so with Mrs. Bertie Brown of Civil Bend, well-know telephone operator for Civil Bend Telephone Company and longtime reporter for the Gallatin North Missourian.

To reach the age of 80 these days is not unusual. However, to reach that mark in a lifetime and still be healthy and active in civic organizations is quite a blessing. This is so with Mrs. Bertie Brown of Civil Bend, well-know telephone operator for Civil Bend Telephone Company and longtime reporter for the Gallatin North Missourian.

Bertie lived in the same house at Civil Bend since 1915, “when I married Frank.” With his death in 1971, she has lived alone in the 7-room house, tending to its upkeep.

She rises each morning around 7 a.m. and begins the day by caring for her dog and five cats. Later, garden work is pursued. She also helps mow her yard, which is about an acre. Up until last year, she mowed it herself.

“I am currently secretary-treasurer of the Linger Longer Club. I was also a 1932 charter member of the organization.” Bertie is a member of the Rebekah Lodge at Pattonsburg and received her 50-year pin four years ago. She is also past secreary-treasurer of the Young at Heart at Gallatin. She served as Civil Bend correspondent for the Gallatin North Missourian for nearly 30 years. “I collect the news by telephone,” she explains, “beginning about 3 or 4 p.m. Sunday. I usually finish by 9 p.m. It goes in the mail at 8 a.m. Monday”

The correspondent says she looks forward to Sunday evenings as she gets a chance to visit with her friends and neighbors. “If one doesn’t keep in touch with people, he’ll get soured on the world,” she philosophized. “Besides, it gives people a chance to tell me their problems, and I tell them some of mine.” She added with a grin and a twinkle in her eyes, “I guess that’s why it takes me so long to gather the news!”

Editor Joe Snyder says “Bertie Brown is one of my favorite gals. She is special not only because she is a fine person, but she’s been one of the most loyal and dependable reporters this paper ever had. Some people send us news when its convenent, but Bertie sends it in regularly whether it’s convenient or not, because she feels a responsibility to us and to her readers. I wish everyone was like Bertie.”

From April, 1915, to August, 1960, the Browns ran Civil Bend Telephone Company. Bertie served as linesman, repairman, operator and an answering service for some. “Yearly rates were $10 a year when we began,” she said. “When we quit in 1960, due to dial phones being installed, the rate was $12 a year.” This included 24-hour line maintenance and operator service.

As operator, Bertie was expected to “know the price of eggs, if the mailman was coming, where the ambulance was headed, and other community news. Now one can’t call the operator for anything but a telephone number!”

When not gathering news, working in her garden, or doing housework, Bertie crochets, keeps a scrapbook and watches television. She crochets afghasn, shawls, centerpeices and edging for pillowslips. She has kept a scrapbook since 1920. It includes the deaths of frinds, relatives and acquaintances and anything of interest in the community.

“Probably the reason I don’t always get my work done is because I have to watch ‘All My Children’ and ‘General Hospital’ on television,” Bertie says. She says she has no specific plans for her birthday. “I usually get a long-distance telephone call from my sister. And a neighbor of mine always takes me out to eat, and I do the same on her birthday.”

Written by Cindy O’Brien for the Gallatin North Missourian, 1976

County’s Namesake a National Hero

This is a brief account of the life of Col. Joseph Hamilton Daviess of Kentucky, summarized from the Feb. 2, 1911, edition of the Gallatin North Missourian. Daviess County is named after this Kentuckian killed by Indians at Tippecanoe — 25 years before the county was organized.

This is a brief account of the life of Col. Joseph Hamilton Daviess of Kentucky, summarized from the Feb. 2, 1911, edition of the Gallatin North Missourian. Daviess County is named after this Kentuckian killed by Indians at Tippecanoe — 25 years before the county was organized.

Joseph (Jo) Daviess was born at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia, Bedford County, near the peaks of Otter on March 4, 1774. His father was also named Joseph and was Irish. His mother was Jean Hamilton Daviess of Scottish descent.

The family moved westward to Kentucky because of the 1779 Land Law and settled in the Crab Orchard neighborhood, Boyle County, near the present-day site of Danville. In his youth, Jo is said to have been a husky woodsman of robust health, but did not like manual labor.

After the age of 12, Joe received a classical education (Latin, Greek, math and some English). At age 18 he joined Major John Adair to escort provisions to army outposts north of the Ohio River. This was a mounted unit of about 200 men.

On the return to Kentucky near Fort St. Clair, the unit was attacked by Chief Little Turtle and 500 of his warriors. Fewer than 15 whites were killed, but the Indians took all the baggage and horses. Joe Daviess saw his horse hitched to a tree on the outskirts of the forest and went back alone after it. Joe recovered his horse, and became the only mounted trooper of the unit.

After the unit disbanded, Joe began the study of law at Harrodsburg, KY. He was admitted into practice in June, 1795. That Septembe, Jo moved to Danville and his practice was mostly land litigation cases. It was Jo’s custom to walk to his cases clad in deerskin, leggings and coonskin cap. With his rifle on his shoulder, he ranged the woods from one court to another.

By age 26 Jo Daviess was a well-known public speaker but not popular as a politician since he was a Federalist. In 1800 Daviess was appointed U.S. Attorney for the District of Kentucky. He held that office until 1807. In 1803 he married Miss Anne Marshall, sister of Chief Justice John Marshall. They went to live in Frankfort, KY, then the social center of the west.

In November, 1806, Daviess led in legal charges against Col. Aaron Burr, charging him with efforts to levy war against the United States. Even though the fact was later proven against Burr, Daviess lost the case and lost popularity. Daviess moved to Owensburg to live on some of the land he owned, but, finding that he had no taste for farming, went back to the law practice at Lexington, KY.

The Indians to the northwest under Tecumseh and his brother, “The Prophet,” were trying to form a confederacy to stop the whites’ westward movement. They formed a village at the junction of the Tippecanoe and the Wabash rivers in north central Indiana. Governor William H. Harrison decided to form an armed force and strike a decisive blow on the Indian town.

Col. Jo Daviess became the Aid de Camp of the Kentucky Militia and was a major commanding a unit of Indian Dragoons. The Kentucky forces consisted of about 800 men of which 270 were mounted. The unit marched up the Wabash River to Tippecanoe. Tecumseh was not at the village, but “The Prophet” led a surprise attack on Harrison’s forces with a like number of warriors at 4 a.m. on Nov. 7, 1811. Harrison entered the Indian village and burned it.

Harrison lost 52 men and had 133 injured. Col. Jo Daviess was among those killed. He was shot in the chest while leading a small charge on the Indians. Col. Daviess was buried on the battlefield at Tippecanoe in an unmarked grave. He was 37 years old, married but childless.

Jo Daviess was remembered by many Kentuckians, and counties in Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri took his name as monuments to his memory.

Written by David Stark, published by the Gallatin North Missourian on Jan. 5, 1983

Oscar Nominee Martha Scott of Jamesport, MO

Martha Scott was a native of Jamesport, MO, who made her celebrated Broadway bow as Emily Webb in the original 1938 production of Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer prize-winning “Our Town.” She died at age 90 in June, 2003, from natural causes while hospitalized in San Fernando Valley, CA.

Martha Scott was a native of Jamesport, MO, who made her celebrated Broadway bow as Emily Webb in the original 1938 production of Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer prize-winning “Our Town.” She died at age 90 in June, 2003, from natural causes while hospitalized in San Fernando Valley, CA.

Martha Ellen Scott was born on Sept. 22, 1912, in Jamesport and was remembered as a lovely little girl with long, dark curls, who was very shy. Her parents were Mr. and Mrs. Walter Scott. The Scotts lived in Jamesport from the time Martha Ellen was born until she was about 13 years old. The family then moved to Kansas City and finally to Detroit, Mich.

She attended college at the University of Michigan where she earned a bachelor’s degree in drama in 1934. According to her family, her true and lasting passion was always the theater.

She enjoyed a long and successful acting career, dating from her early days in theater on through movies and television totaling over 60 years. She originate the role of Emily in “Our Town” and earned a 1940 best actress Oscar nomination re-creating the role in her film debut. Wilder’s play is set in a small New England town and portrays the universal cycles of birth, love, and death.

Mrs. Scott’s son, Scott Alsop, said his mother used a cemetery in her hometown to prepare herself for the third act of the play, which takes place in a small town cemetery. “She told me she used that place as her image because it’s so serene and beautiful,” he said. He also noted that her deceased relatives — the Scotts and the McKinleys — “became the Gibbs and the Webbs in the play.”

Martha Scott’s funeral was handled by McWilliams Funeral Home. Among flowers sent were those from Laura Dern, who starred in the movie “Jurassic Park” and also from Mrs. Dern’s mother, Diana Ladd, also a film star. In the late 1970s, Mr. Alsop and his mother visited the cemetery in Jamesport. And, he said, “That’s where she wanted to rest.”

Reprinted from the Gallatin North Missourian, June 4, 2003; and Gallatin Democrat, Oct. 6, 1938.

Another Account of Gallatin’s Newspaper Martyr

Few events in history shook Gallatin more than when Hugh Y. Tarwater entered the office of The Gallatin Democrat on a chilly December afternoon in 1919 and fatally shot its longtime publisher, Wesley Robertson. Missouri history reveals “Uncle Wes” as the only editor shot and killed in the line of duty.

Few events in history shook Gallatin more than when Hugh Y. Tarwater entered the office of The Gallatin Democrat on a chilly December afternoon in 1919 and fatally shot its longtime publisher, Wesley Robertson. Missouri history reveals “Uncle Wes” as the only editor shot and killed in the line of duty.

The shooting climaxed a running feud between newspaper publishers Robertson and partner Robert Ball with Mr. Tarwater, who had been city clerk for four years. Tarwater felt victimized during a crusade by The Democrat to rid the community of bootleggers. An article about Tarwater’s conviction and fine prompted a libel suit by Tarwater who sought $20,000 in damages. There was little concern by the publishers until it was discovered that the police court journal for the day Tarwater appreared in court was missing.

During the legal maneurvering which followed, Gallatin was hosting a Chautauqua in Dockery Park. The program included some stellar attractions and speakers of note. Uncle Wes was on the program committee. When one of the advertised speakers failed to appear, with a large crowd waiting in the boiling sun, it became Uncle Wes’s duty — or more his opportunity — to fill in.

Imagine, if you will, this colorful, rotund, good-natured bundle of quick and often biting wit, leaning back on his ample haunches, inserting his thumbs into his suspenders and opening his remarks by declaring, “Had I known I would be called upon to speak, I would have worn by $20,000 suit.” The crowd roared. But the plaintiff, who happened to be in the audience, stalked from the scene red-faced and enraged. This was just a few days before the lawsuit was to have been tried.

On Dec. 23, after spending the early afternoon drinking in the sheriff’s office, Tarwater left the courthouse and made his way to the newspaper office. There was a commotion and a shot. Robertson, who had been standing by his rolltop desk, slumped to the floor. There was some speculation about how Tarwater may have been provoked into confronting Robertson with a loaded .32 pistol and the fact that a sheriff’s car pulled up at the newspaper office to whisk Tarwater away before any alarm could be telephoned. The Daviess County Court, which functioned as commissioners, along with Sheriff J. Atch Blair, were Republicans and often targets of The Democrat’s editorials.

The funeral for Uncle Wes was perhaps the biggest in Gallatin’s history. Robertson was a popular community leader, even serving as Gallatin’s official Santa Claus during the holiday seasons.

Tarwater was tried for murder in Gallatin on Oct. 4, 1920. Immediately after the shooting of Robertson, Tarwater suffered a nervous breakdown and attended his trial in a wheelchair. The trial lasted eight days. The defense was based on insanity. In failing health heightened by stress, Tarwater was found guilty by a circuit court jury and was sentenced to 35 years. Tarwater appealed to the Missouri Supreme Court, which affirmed the decision. He arrived at the state penitentiary in Jefferson City on May 21, 1922. From time to time, Tarwater’s application for parole or pardon met strong opposition from Missouri newspapers. He finally died in the penitentiary, and his burial was in Lile Cemetery on the west side of Gallatin. He was survived at the time of his death by his widow, a daughter who was living in California and a son living in Arizona.

Although The Democrat’s campaign against bootlegging in the county never fully succeeded, it seems ironic that a few weeks after Uncle Wes died the following item appeared on the newspaper’s front page, presumably written by publisher Robert Ball. It was entitled, “Good-bye, John!”

“At midnight Friday old John Barleycorn became a fugitive from justice and was outlawed in every state in the Union. National Prohibition went into effect and the entire country is up in arms against John, who reiungned supreme for so many years.

“The smiles he brought and the good times he was reputed to have given to so many are things of memory only, but the trail of desolation, heartaches, blasted hopes and ruined lives are the things of reality he has left strewn all over America. They will serve to remind not only this generation but future generations of the curse to mankind.

“Good-bye, John — here’s hoping your likes will never pass this way again.”

Robert J. Ball was junior manager of the Gallatin Democrat at the time that outraged city clerk Hugh Tarwater shot and killed Wesley L. Robertson on Dec. 23, 1919. Tarwater also shot at Ball but he escaped without injury during the incident which unfolded in the printing office on North Main Street just off the square. Not long afterwards, Ball departed for Colorado.

Reprinted, in part, from the Gallatin Democrat published in May, 1922

Banking Brought A.M. Dockery to Gallatin

In 1914, in a tribute to Tom Yates, Gov. A.M. Dockery told how Yates brought him to Galatin in 1874. In that tribute, Dockery wrote the following record of how they got together to start the Farmers Exchange Bank in Gallatin:

In 1914, in a tribute to Tom Yates, Gov. A.M. Dockery told how Yates brought him to Galatin in 1874. In that tribute, Dockery wrote the following record of how they got together to start the Farmers Exchange Bank in Gallatin:

“I first made his (Mr. Yates) acquaintance as a senior member of the drug frim of Yates & Dillon in Chillicothe and as a director of the Chillicothe Savings Association… our relations during the six years of our residence and association at Chillicothe were as they have always been (during the past 46 years) — very close along busienss, social and farternal and other lines of activity.

“In January, 1874, I had practically completed arrangements to remove to Milan and engage in the banking business at that place… Hearing of this contemplated removal, Mr. Yates induced me to abandon it and aid him in the organization of a bank at Gallatin.

“As a result of this understanding, on March 4, 1874, we bought the banking business of (Mr. G.) Amstrong and (Mr.) Thompson and on the 20th of that same month organized the Farmers Exchange Bank with Mr. Yates as president and myself as cashier.”

The Farmers Exchange Bank was opened for business on March 20, 1874, with subscribed stock of $50,000. THomas Booten Yates was elected president, Gabriel Feurt, Judge of the county court, was vice president; and Dr. Dockery was cashier and secretary. Others on the first board of directors were Capt. John Ballinger (postmaster), B.F. Dillin, Moses Brown, B.G. Kimball, Capt. N.B. Brown, A.L. Buzzard, J.P. Drummond, A.W. Gay, W.M. Brostaph (drugist), and D.H. Davis (drugist).

In 1881, the bank was the only bank in Gallatin and had paid in capital and retained profits of $14,000. Deposits increased from under $40,000 to nearly $200,000 (roughly $5 million in today’s economy). New directors included Hadley Brown, Jacob Poage, William Ray, R.M. Barnett, R. Downing and the governor’s grandfather, Alexander Dockery Sr.

In about 1888 the bank moved into a new building that it rented across Jackson Street to the south. The old office became the Stephens Farm Loan Company, with Tom Yates as president.

In 1892 Yates moved to organize the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Jamesport (later known as the Commercial Bank). He operated it for about 10 years. Yates continued to run the Stephens Company and kept his residence in Gallatin. Milton Ewing and John Meade took over the Farmers Exchange Bank that year. The original subscribed stock was not reported as all paid in until 1899 when John Meade became president.

In 1910 the Exchange Bank’s deposits were down to $134,000. A new building was constructed across the intersection northwest and was home fo the bank in 1913. The bank owned its first home. THis building became the Bank of Galatin in 1927 and the post office was also resident there from about 1918 to 1942.

When the Farmers Exchange Bank closed in March, 1926, it had $540,000 in deposits, capital and surplus of $110,000 and $800,000 in loans outstanding. The Jameson banks closed the next week with deposits of $120,000. The Bank of Jameson was largely owned by stockholders of the Farmers Exchange Bank of Gallatin, which lasted 52 years.

FARMERS EXCHANGE BANK OFFICERS:

1874 — T.B. Yates, president; A.M. Dockery, cashier
1892 — Milton Ewing, president; J.W. Meade, cashier (since 1886)
1899 — J.W. Meade, president; E.D. Mann, cashier
1910 — J.W. Meade, president; Homer Feurt, cashier
1915 — Homer Feurt, president (to 1926); cashier (unreported)

Research by David Stark

Kemper Family Has Ties to Daviess County

Here’s a famous Missourian with a little-known connection to Daviess County. William T. Kemper, whose family fortune became one of Kansas City’s largest, was born in Gallatin on Nov. 2, 1865. Kemper is the name lavished on Kansas City’s civic arena. Kemper is the name of the family which controls one of Missouri’s largest financial institutions, United Missouri Bank of Kansas City. And Kemper is one photograph you will find displayed in the third floor courtroom of the Daviess County courthouse.

Here’s a famous Missourian with a little-known connection to Daviess County. William T. Kemper, whose family fortune became one of Kansas City’s largest, was born in Gallatin on Nov. 2, 1865. Kemper is the name lavished on Kansas City’s civic arena. Kemper is the name of the family which controls one of Missouri’s largest financial institutions, United Missouri Bank of Kansas City. And Kemper is one photograph you will find displayed in the third floor courtroom of the Daviess County courthouse.

William Kemper’s ties to Daviess County were probably brief. Local records show that his father, James Kemper, was in the mercantile business at the southeast corner of the Gallatin business square in partnership with Major (Lt.Col.) Samuel P. Cox and Capt. John Ballinger. These partners were well-known adventurous citizens who figure prominently in early Daviess County history. The firm was called Ballinger, Cox & Kemper and lasted at least from Feb. 28, 1865, to Jan. 13, 1866. During this time the real estate was jointly held (Block 3 west and 3 south in Gallatin; Book L, page 587 and Book M, page 531), purchased for $1,500; John Ballinger later purchased Kemper’s interest for $1,250.

J.M. Kemper and his wife also held a lot in the northwest corner of the square From Nov. 23, 1865, to April 5, 1866, although it is not known whether this was business or residential property. This was purchased from James L. Davis and sold to Elizabeth Seat (Book M, page 436 and Book N, page 232. All of Lot #6, Block 5 West and 2 south). The Kempers paid $650 and received $700 for this property.

The only other local record found shows J.M. Kemper signing a petition on adding land to Caldwell County. This petition, dated Jan. 22, 1868, proved unsuccessful.

The Kempers evidently left Gallatin for St. Joseph. William T. Kemper Sr. began his career at age 14 sweeping floors in a shoe store in which his father was a partner. From shoe store janitor, young Kemper became shoe salesman representing Noyes, Morman & Kemper. He called on the Valley Falls, KS, firm of his future father-in-law, Rufus Henry Crosby. He married Charlotte Crosby in 1890, and the couple moved to Kansas City three years later.

At age 26, Kemper organized the Kemper Mill and Elevator Company, followed by Kemper Investment Company, and then Kemper Mercantile Company, an early day mail order house. At the turn of the century when Kemper was elected to head the Board of Trade, he was its youngest president ever at age 33.

Every decade became a milestone for Kemper as he entered banking. Within 10 years, W.T. Kemper was persident of the Commerce Trust Company empire. Ten years later he made a fortune, selling the Commerce at the boom price of $220 a share, and then 10 years later buying it back at $86 per share. Ironically, one source of Kemper’s fortune did not derive from banking but from the defunct KC, Mexico & Orient Railroad. Stock of dubious value in the never completed, disconnected route to the west coast of Mexico proved valuable when oil was discovered along the road’s tracks in Oklahoma, Texas and the Southwest.

Money-making, Kemper’s long suit, was interspersed with modicum of political activity — as Democratic National Committeeman, one-time Democratic mayoral candidate (defeated), and police commissioner. But for the most part, Kemper stuck to his last — banking — until his death at age 72 in January, 1938. His death attracted widespread attention, with journalist icon William Allen White eulogizing Kemper’s life that reflected broadly on the nation’s history.

Taken from research by Brent Schondelmeyer, William Kemper’s grandson, in a corporate history of the United Missouri Bank of Kansas City, and by David Stark of Gallatin; June, 1994.

A Homecoming for Rear Admiral Richard H. Cruzen

On May 20, 1947, Galaltin’s favorite explorer — Rear Admiral Ricahrd H. Cruzen — was the honored guest at a Homecoming dinner sponsored by the Gallatin Chamber of Commerce at the McDonald Tea Room. Over 170 people attended.

On May 20, 1947, Galaltin’s favorite explorer — Rear Admiral Ricahrd H. Cruzen — was the honored guest at a Homecoming dinner sponsored by the Gallatin Chamber of Commerce at the McDonald Tea Room. Over 170 people attended.

Richard (Dick) Cruzen was the son of Nathaniel Green Jr. and Mary Edna Gearhart Cruzen of Gallatin. Nathaniel Green Jr. returned to Gallatin in 1901 to join a law practice with Rollin Britton (the firm became known as Cruzen, Mann & Leopard ni 1913). Richard was born in Kansas City, came to Galaltin with his parents at age 4, and called Gallatin his hometown.

Cruzen graduated from Gallatin High School in 1914. His father and uncle, Harry Cruzen both graduated from Wentworth Military Academy at Lexington, MO. Richard, however, left Gallatin to attend VMI at Lexington, VA. He also attended a prep school at Severn Park, MD, before entering the U.S. Naval Academy, a member of the Class of 1920. Cruzen became an ensign in June, 1919. He said he was thinking about attending West Point, but Judge J.W. Alexander of Gallatin placed him into Annapolis.

When Cruzen’s father died as a result of an auto accident in 1931, Cruzen was back at Annapolis as an instructor.

In 1939 Cruzen was a Navy Lt. Commander and was named skipper of the USS Bear by explorer Byrd. The Bear was a sailing schooner purchased by Admiral Byrd to explore the “unknown continent” — the Antarctic. The sailing ship was used because it did not need to be refuled in remote locations.

The Bear was an old seal fishing ship built in 1873 at Dundee, Scotland. It was 190 feet long. Admiral Byrd obtained it for explorations in 1932 and sailed it from Boston in 1933 to the Antarctic, returning to Boston in 1935. Cruzen had The Bear redone in 1939 at a cost of $200,000, and rigged it as a Barkentine. He added a 600hp diesel auxiliary engine and put a small sea plane on board.

In the book, “Operatrion Deepfreeze” by Rear Admiral George J. Dufek, Richard Cruzen is described by the then Navy lieutenant Dufek as follows:

“I reported for duty on the USS Bear at the Boston Naval Shipyard. I reported to Lt. Commander Ricahrd Cruzen in the sail loft in the spring of 1939. Cruzen had a deep well of love for his fellow man which endeared him to everyone …(we) became fast friends (and I) took three tours of duty under his command.

“I considered Cruzen to be the finest and most capable officer I have ever served in the Navy. He was filled with boundless good humor and energy. He often reminded me of a bantam rooster and, in tense moments, he would walk like one. He made quick decisions, but only after a careful study of the factors involved in the problem. His favorite greeting to friends, to urge them to get on with the work, was ‘All right, Fattey, let’s get going.'”

Longtime Gallatin newspaper publisher Joe Snyder reported that Admiral Cruzen was “a remarkably down-to-earth man for all his years as a professional military commander… he never lost his feeling for his hometown.”

Cruzen and Dufek sailed The Bear from Boston on Nov. 22, 1939, via the Panama Canal for Little America in Antarctica. The Bear entered pack ice of the Ross Sea in mid-January, 1940, and arrived at the Bay of Whales to establish Little America III. Admiral Byrd joined them on board from the USS North Star. Cruzen sailed the old schooner up and down the coast and returned to Boston covering 14,000 miles without dropping anchor. Cruzen did not go exploring again with Dufek and Byrd until 1946 after World War II.

Captain Cruzen did not tell much of his war efforts, but recounted, in 1945 during a visit to Gallatin, that he had been operations officer under Admiral Kinkaid for the engagement of the Seventh Fleet in the Southwest Pacific. He was in the invasions of Leyte Island and in the sea battle of Leyte Gulf. He pased through Gallatin on his way to take command of the USS Birmingham.

In 1946 Captain Cruzen got Dufek to help on an Arctic sail of the USS Bear to establish weather bases in Greenland and the Arctic Archipelago. This was named “Operation Nanook” and Cruzen laid out the first airfield in Greenland at Thule. They returned in The Bear in August, 1946, and started planning for the Navy’s first large scale expedition to the Antarctic.

For Operation Highjump (1946-47) and after 30 years of Navy service, Cruzen was promoted to Rear Admiral and made the Task Force Commander. Task Force #68 comprised of 13 ships, 23 aircraft and 4,700 seamen. The job was to survey the coasts and as much of the continent as possible, using aircraft cameras. Cruzen got to the Ross Sea during the last days of December, 1946. In the next four weeks, the plans spent 220 hours in the air over Antarctica, flying 22,700 miles and taking over 70,000 photographs. They covered 60% of the coastline — 25% of which had never been seen before.

By March 4, 1947, all ships had started for home. This was the first time icebreaker ships had been used in the Antarctic. The work was Navy funded and utilized leftover supplies from the war. Cruzen estalished Little America IV and other bases and weather stations.

Rear Admiral George Dufek continued on with south pole exploration into the late 1950s in Operation Deepfreeze.

On April 14, 1947, Cruzen and Byrd were on the USS Mt. Olympus, a luxury flag ship which was called a communications ship by the Navy, when they were met by the Secretary of the Navy at naval yards at Washington, D.C. Cruzen spent several months with reports and giving speeches about the work completed. He later commanded support forces for the atomic weapons tests at the Eniwetock Atoll. He commanded U.S. Naval forces in and near the Phillippines before retiring to private business after 8 more years of Navy service. He retired in 1954.

When his mother, Edna Cruzen, died on Oct. 26, 1965, Richard Cruzen and his sister, Mary, came back to Gallatin for the funeral. Admiral Cruzen probably got his name from his great-grandfather, Richard R. Cruzen, who was an inspector of the National Armory at Harper’s Ferry, VA. His grandfather also worked there before leaving for Missouri at age 20.

Admiral Cruzen’s grandfather was Nathaniel Green Cruzen, born in Jefferson County, VA, on Oct. 14, 1826. In December 1860, he married Mary Faulkner, daughter of James Gillilan who was the founder of Jamesport, MO. Admiral Cruzen and his wife, Margaret, raised three children. Their only son, Nathaniel III, was killed in a hunting accident in 1946 while the Admiral was out to sea.

The Admiral’s sister, Mary, married Lt. Orville “Pinkie” Walsh while she was teaching school at Westport High School in Kansas City. John Leopard of Gallatin recalls their elaborate military wedding at the home of Edna Cruzen in Gallatin. General O.E. Walsh was part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and served in the Pacific during World War II as a member of General MacArthur’s staff. He achieved the rank of Major General before retiring to Portland, OR. At one time, he was in charge of the Missouri River Division of the Corps of Engineers. They raised two children, Sally and Richard.

Written by David Stark, Gallatin; March, 1997.

Who Was Capt. John Sheets?

John W. Sheets (1818-1869) is known mostly as an unfortunate victim of circumstance, allegedly shot by outlawn Jesse James who mistook him for former Union leader Samuel Cox during the 1869 robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association in Gallatin. But a look at the life of John Sheets reveals much more.

John W. Sheets (1818-1869) is known mostly as an unfortunate victim of circumstance, allegedly shot by outlawn Jesse James who mistook him for former Union leader Samuel Cox during the 1869 robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association in Gallatin. But a look at the life of John Sheets reveals much more.

Research reveals many details about the life and times of John W. Sheets. From January 1838 through May 1842 he kept the records of property lot sales in Gallatin. On Aug. 28, 1847, he joined the U.S. Army to serve in the Mexican War.

John Sheets served as sheriff of Daviess County from 1848 to 1852, and then as circuit clerk of Daviess County from 1852 to 1858. He then served as recorder of deeds from 1858 to 1862.

During the Civil War, John Sheets was a Captain of Company D, First Regiment of Cavalry in the Missouri State Militia for the Union (1862-64). He returned to civilian life to become a partner in a dry goods store in Gallatin, known as Sheets & Brosius, and saw his partner murdered in the store in 1864.

From 1865 until his death, Capt. Sheets was employed by Col. McFerran as cashier of the Daviess County Savings Association. It was while he was at work that Sheets was shot to death. Although Jesse James was never convicted of murdering Sheets nor of robbing the savings association, the robbery which occurred Dec. 7, 1869, marks the first time the State of Missouri officially declared a bounty on Jesse James, branding him as an outlaw. Witnesses said Jesse James was sworn to avenge the death of Confederate guerilla “Bloody” Bill Anderson by killing the man credited with killing Anderson, Samuel P. Cox. Apparently, James mistook John Sheets for Samuel Cox — shooting first before asking questions. A stone monument marks the grave of Capt. Sheets in Lyle Cemetery, next to Gallatin First Baptist Church.

Resting place of Capt. John Sheets in Gallatin’s Lyle Cemetery

The life of John Sheets also connects to another notorious outlaw of the Old West — that of Johnny Ringo. Sheets had control of the Greenfield and Einstien Store where his father worked as a gun smith when the store was rented to Martin Ringo and B.B. Pryor (1858-1861). Martin Ringo was the father of outlaw Johnny Ringo, famous in the gunfight lore of Tombstone, AZ.

John Sheets was the son of Henry Sheets of Virginia; his mother was Rachel Ellis of Jefferson County, VA, the daughter of Obediah Ellis (1745-1825) of Georgetown in Scott County, KY.

In November, 1850, at age 29 John Sheets married Martha R. Casey, daughter of Thomas J. and Martha Casey of Gallatin. The couple were parents of two children before Martha’s death in 1856.

In September, 1861, Sheets married Mary G. Clingan, the daughter of Major Thomas and Elizabeth Clingan of Gallatin.

Researched by David Stark, Gallatin; December, 2000.

Novelist Based Stories, Characters on Gallatin

Gallatin native John Selby was a very successful journalist, art critic, and editor. He also wrote 12 books and had a syndicated book column, the widely circulated “Literary Guidepost.” Ten of Selby’s books were published, and six of these have parts about Gallatin, MO. The names were changed, but, like television’s “Peyton Place,” just changing names didn’t prevent Gallatin citizens from recognizing themselves …and objecting to what was written.

Gallatin native John Selby was a very successful journalist, art critic, and editor. He also wrote 12 books and had a syndicated book column, the widely circulated “Literary Guidepost.” Ten of Selby’s books were published, and six of these have parts about Gallatin, MO. The names were changed, but, like television’s “Peyton Place,” just changing names didn’t prevent Gallatin citizens from recognizing themselves …and objecting to what was written.

John Allen Selby was born in Gallatin on Feb. 7, 1897, when Gallatin was a busy college town (Grand River College). He became a prize winning author with his first book; “Sam” was the American winner in the All Nations Prize Novel Competition of 1939.

John was the oldest son of Jonathan Selby, a prominent lawyer at Gallatin. John was a member of the GHS Class of 1914, and went on to school at Park College and at the University of Missouri. After school, he worked as a journalist and music critic for the Kansas City Star from 1918 to 1929. While working as a reporter, Selby covered a wide variety of subjects except for spectator sports, in which he expressed little interest.

Selby lived in France three years when many American artists took residence there (1929-32). In 1932, he became the New York music and arts editor for the Associated Press. While working in New York, he made his home in Connecticut with his wife, Esther (Baxter), originally from Pittsburg, KS.

In 1944 Selby left the Associated Press to become associate editor and publicity director for Rinehart & Company Inc., a book publisher on Madison Avenue. He was promoted to Editor-in-Chief the following year, and served in that capacity until his retirement in 1958.

While in retirement, Selby lectured at Columbia University, New York, and elsewhere. He was both a student and teacher at Columbia University, teaching courses in short-story writing. In 1965 he moved to Taormino, Sicily, where he died at age 83 on May 7, 1980, following a brief illness. During his retirement, he returned to Gallatin, MO, for a few months in 1972.

SELBY’S BOOKS

Selby’s first book was the prize winner “Sam” published in 1939. It is a novel about a newspaper owner in Kansas City in the early stockyard years.

His second book, “Island in the Corn” (1944) is a novel about the Trace-Starbuck family that came to Gallatin about 1900 after big business losses at other places.

His next book, “Starbuck” (1943) is about the only son of the Trace-Starbuck family, who was raised in Gallatin and became a world famous musician. Selby ended the story with Starbuck back at the old Trace family home after World War II.

Selby’s fourth book, “Elegant Journey” (1944), is about the earlier history of the Trace family. The novel covered the family story from roughly 1840 to 1880.

The next book, “The Man Who Never Changed” (1954), is a novel about the success of character Dennis Sandzen as he developed into a reknowned professional conductor.

His sixth book, “Time Was” (1956), is about a Gallatin family during the times of 1910. There is much that seems very familiar to readers residing in Gallatin, including a story about Gallatin’s first car, which was homemade.

The next book, “The Days Dividing” (1958), is about Henry Thorne and Harrison Adrian, two friends from California that came to live on East Grand Street after their contact with the famous Sara Wnichester, who was haunted by the ghosts of all things killed by the Winchester rifle.

Book number eight is “A Few Short Blocks Between” (1959), telling the story of Marian Byrd from Gallatin. Byrd became governor of the state in 1900. The few short blocks was the distance between the governor’s house and the state prison. This is the last published book that relates to anything about Gallatin.

Selby’s ninth novel, “Madame” (1961), is about the last few days of the life of a syndicated columnist who wrote on women’s issues. The story starts at Park College and goes on toward New York, traveling by car.

Selby’s last published book is “Beyond Civil Rights” (1966). This is a non-fiction history of the Karamn Project in Cleveland, OH. Much of it is about training black artists.

These 10 published books are available at the Daviess County Library in Gallatin. Janet Selby, Gallatin, holds her uncle’s last two unpublished manuscripts. They are entitled “The Andalusian Fury” and “What Came After Bertha.”

John Selby did what most good writers should do, that is, write about things they know. There is much of the flavor of Gallatin at the turn of the century when reading some of John Selby’s books, as well as his apparant love and interest in classical music and the arts.

Written by David Stark, Gallatin; August, 1997

Argument Over 50-Cents Leads to Murder

Many who venture through Lyle Cemetery across from First Baptist Church in Gallatin are naturally unaware of much of the local history that lies there. A tombstone for Jonathan “Jona” Brosius offers an obscure example. His name is only a footnote to the more famous, or rather infamous — the uncle to William “Curley Bill” Brosius, purportedly the best friend of outlaw Johnny Ringo, who was immortalized when shot by Wyatt Earp near Tombstone, AZ, in 1882.

Many who venture through Lyle Cemetery across from First Baptist Church in Gallatin are naturally unaware of much of the local history that lies there. A tombstone for Jonathan “Jona” Brosius offers an obscure example. His name is only a footnote to the more famous, or rather infamous — the uncle to William “Curley Bill” Brosius, purportedly the best friend of outlaw Johnny Ringo, who was immortalized when shot by Wyatt Earp near Tombstone, AZ, in 1882.

The grave of Jonathan Brosius lies not far from the marker of Capt. John Sheets, the victim of the 1869 James Gang robbery in Gallatin.

Jona Brosius died young at age 29. When he was shot, he left a 25-year-old wife and 7-year-old daughter. But that’s not what makes his story compelling; rather, it’s the reason why he died which describes the fervor of his times.

Jonathan Brosius was murdered over a half dollar dispute with teamster, P.B. Hunter.

Jona had sent several wagons after supplies that had come to Hamilton by train. He paid $4 per wagonload and offered the same to Mr. Hunter. Hunter wanted $4.50, stating he had moved 1800 pounds, or 400 pounds more than that carried by other teams.

The goods were delivered to the store called Sheets & Brosius on Dec. 20. The store partners were busy marking items for sale when Hunter made his demand for payment about 9 a.m. Both Capt. Sheets and Samuel Cox were in the store and became aware of the dispute.

Cox indicated that $4.50 would be the charge for 1800 pounds at the customary rate of 25 cents per 100 pounds of cargo. But Hunter was turned down. He left and told his sad story to others in town, saying he’d get his money and that he’d kill Jona rather than let Jona put his hands on him.

At 11 a.m. Hunter returned to the store with a shawl held by his left hand, covering his right hand. Hunter again demanded his $4.50. Jona got $4 which Hunter refused. Harsh words were exchanged until Jona ordered Hunter out of the store. Some witnesses later indicated that Jona apparently planned to fight Hunter on the street, but Jona made no motion to strike Hunter in the store.

Jona had been marking up grubbing hoes and had one in hand as Hunter backed toward the door. Just after Hunter backed into the doorway, he raised his right hand from under the shawl and, with arm at full length, shot Jona Brosius one time just above the heart from a distance of six feet.

Capt. Sheets was two feet behind Jona and a little to his left when the shot was fired. Three others in the store saw the shootnig. They were J.M. Doling, J.M. Smith, and J.W. Green. Some said that Brosius had laid down the 10-pound hoe before he was shot.

Hunter paused in the doorway, then hurried toward the circuit clerk’s building located east of the courthouse. John Sheets trailed Hunter at a distance, watching Hunter trot with pistol in hand as he looked back from time to time at Sheets.

John Green was the first to help Brosius, asking if he was badly hurt. Jona said, "John, I’m killed." When Jona was shot, he grabbed his chest with both hands and groaned. Green and James Doling put Jona on a bed in the back of the store, and Brosius died within 5 minutes.

Hunter went directly to the clerk’s office and Samuel Cox, saying "Major, I want protection." Acting Sheriff James L. Powell took Hunter’s pistol, described as a 5-inch Manhattan (a cap and ball revolver, either .31 or .36 caliber). The 5-shot revolver had four shots left in it.

Justices of the Peace Owen McGee and John Taylor made statements recording the information above, also noting that Hunter was known in Gallatin for a year as a peaceable man. Acting Prosecuting Attorney James H. Brosius (Jona’s brother) brought forward the charge of murder.

Hunter was held in the stone jail next to the courthouse until Feb. 2, 1865, when he was released on $20,000 bond. In the May term of 1865, a grand jury charged Hunter with second degree murder.

An 1882 report stated that Hunter was not seen again in Gallatin.

Written by David Stark, Gallatin.

Samuel Cox — A Daviess County Hero

The adventures of Major S.P. Cox (1828-1913) reads like a history of his time including the westerward movement, the Mexican War, the west’s early Indian wars, the California gold rush, the Civil War, and the James Gang.

The adventures of Major S.P. Cox (1828-1913) reads like a history of his time including the westerward movement, the Mexican War, the west’s early Indian wars, the California gold rush, the Civil War, and the James Gang.

Samuel Cox was born on Dec. 16, 1828, at Williamsburg in Whitley County, KY. He moved to Daviess County, MO, in 1839 with his father, Franklin Cox. The family settled in the southeastern part of the county near the old Ames Saw Mill and Trosper Lake.At age 19 Samuel enlisted at St. Joseph in the spring of 1847. He served under Capt. William H. Rogers in Company D of the Oregon Battalion. Cox was ordered down the Santa Fe trail. But order changes took him and other Missouri volunteers to develop the Oregon Trail, Mormon Trail, and to protect the Santa Fe Trail from waring Sioux as far north as Yankaton, S.D., where the unit was delayed by bad weather and low provisions.In 1848 Cox helped complete Fort Kearny in south central Nebraska. The fort was built on the south bank of the Platte River where the Oregon Trail first came to the river from the southeast. The fort was named for General Stephen Watts Kearny soon after his death.California Gold RushCox moved to Gallatin where in 1850 he married and entered into the mercantile business with George Poage. In 1854 Cox and family, with oxen and cattle, moved to Oroville, CA. There he worked as a teamster for the gold diggers and later as a dairyman.The family was soon prosperous but longed again for home. Cox sold out and with the family went to San Francisco and embarked with them by steamer. They returned by way of Nicaraugua and Baltimore. They were shipwrecked near Key West, adding another adventure to their lives.During the Mexican War, the western forces were not well supplied by the army’s system of wagon trains. The army contracted the supply of western forts to private companies. The largest of these contractors in the west was the company of Russell, Majors and Waddell, delivering north and west out of Fort Leavenworth. Samuel Cox joined this firm in 1856 as a wagon master.In 1859 Cox carried important dispatches to Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston near Salt Lake City. Cox made the trip by himself, 1200 miles by mule. He claimed to have befriended Red Cloud, chief of the Oglala Sioux, having seen him several times in the 1847 to 1860 period.The Civil WarCox was one of the few county people that declared openly in favor of the Union side after the start of the war in 1861. He had been serving for some time as a Deputy Sheriff under Sheriff James T. Minor.In September 1861, Cox formed the Cox Battalion and commanded Company A and Company B of that unit for six months. Major Cox then joined the First Missouri State Militia under Col. McNeil. They entered the Battle of Kirksville on Aug. 6, 1862, under Col. McFarran. A few days later Cox again bottled Porter’s forces at Lee’s Ford on the Chariton River.In 1864 the country was overrun by guerilla bands and Major Cox was given command of some militia troops because guerillas udner Thrailkill and Thornton ahd pillaged Kingston and Mirabile. They were threatening Plattsburg where a Capt. Turner had been killed. Major Cox overtook them at Union Mills in Platte County, and “dispersed them after a sharp fight.”“Bloody Bill” AndersonProbably the greatest service rendered by Major Cox during his active service in the Civil War which gained him the greatest fame was the killing of Bill Anderson on Oct. 27, 1864. Anderson was a notorious guerilla chief who claimed he had killed 54 men. Major Cox gave the following account in his own words:”When I left my home in Gallatin, I learned that Price’s men had crossed the river (Missouri River at Lexington), I got to Hamilton and met Major McDonald retreating with his cavalry. He sent me to St. Joseph to see General Craig as to what to do, but when I reached there McDonald had telegraphed for me to be sent back to take charge of the men.”I was not a member of that company, but Gen. James Craig telegraphed Gov. Hall to commision me a Lt. Colonel of the 33rd M.E.M.; this he did and I went back to Hamilton and took charge of the men.”Anderson and his gang had been terrorizing north Missouri for some time, and the people lived in perfect awe of them. only a few days before they had visited Glasgow, took one of its wealthy citizens (Ben Lewis) a prisoner, and placed a price of $5,000 as a bounty for his release. This the women of Glasgow raised and paid to save Lewis’ life.”I decided to hunt down Anderson, known then to be somewhere in north central Missouri, and put a stop to his depredations.”The next day I took my command to Knoxville, MO. I heard next morning of rebels at Millville having horses shod, I went after them but they had gone. I took the blacksmith back to Richmond and obtained some information from him.”That day Bill Anderson and his guerillas killed old man Elliott within three miles of Richmond. So terrorized were the people that they would give no information of the movements of the band for fear they would meet death if they did.”But one brave woman, whose name I do not remember, came to me with the information as to where the guerrilla chieftain and his gang were in camp and what they would be found doing and directed me as to the best way to reach them. She said we would know the place by a deep ravine crossed only by a wooden bridge.”I found things just as she had told me and decided to bring on the fight in the timber near this bridge. I had only about 300 men under my command and gave the the word to stand their ground — this fight must be victory or death — and not a man faltered. We dismounted at the wooden bridge leaving our horses in charge of the men with the commissary wagons.”Crossing the bridge I stationed my men in the timber and gave explicit instructions not to begin shooting until I gave the command. Lt. Baker was sent ahead to reconnoiter and bring on the fight with instructions to retreat through our line.”Cas. Morton, now a retired brigadier general, of Washington, D.C., was sent to Baker with the word to start the fight. Baker dashed up to where Anderson and his men were having meal ground and getting provisions, and opened fire. Instantly Anderson and his men were in their saddles and gave chase to Baker, who retreated under instructions and came dashing through our line. Anderson and some 20 of his men came in their historic manner, with their bridle reins in their teeth and revolver in each hand.”When my men opened fire, many of Anderson’s command went down. Others turned and fled, but the grim old chieftain and two of his men went right through the line, shooting and yelling, and it was as Anderson and one of his men turned and came back that both of them were killed.”The celebrated (Capt.) Arch Clemens, who had gone through our line with Anderson, kept right on across the bridge and stampeded my wagon train and its guards boy yelling to them to fly as the command was cut to pieces, and thinking it was one of their men, they ran and kept it up until I was a day or two getting them together again. In the hubbub, Clemens escaped.”Clell Miller, afterwards a noted bank robber and a desperate character, was wounded in this fight and taken prisoner. It was with difficulty I restrained my men and the citizens from lynching him. Miller was afterwards kiled in a bank robbery in Northfield, MN.”When Bill Anderson fell from his horse, took one of his pistols and Adolph Vogel, now living near Jameson, who was a bugler of my command, I took a brace of six pistols from around his body. We also took $600 in money, one gold and one silver watch from his clothing, and one of these watches, two of the pistols and the fine gray mare Anderson rode were afterwards given me by the Brigadier Gen. James Craig.”A letter I had written to Col. Pace at Liberty, to meet me the next day with what men he could muster, was also found on Anderson’s body, showing that he had captured and rifled the mail.”Anderson’s body was taken to Richmopnd and buried in the cemetery north of town. A guard had to be placed over the body to keep the enraged citizens from tearing it to pieces.”The place where Major Cox killed Anderson was near a small town in Ray County called Albany, but since merged into Orrick.Capt. N.B. Brown of Gallatin and Marion Township was with Major Cox in the fight and Corp’l James Mulican of Salem Township was killed in the fight. Mulican was wounded in 13 places, most of which were inflicted by Anderson himself. Lt. Baker was from Knoxville, MO.In 1862 Major Cox served the county as recorder and circuit clerk. In 1874 he was collector for Union Township. He died on Aug. 21, 1913 and is bured at Brown Cemetery at Gallatin.

Researched by David Stark, Gallatin; written by Darryl Wilkinson, Gallatin North Missourian, 1983