Daniel Smoote Sues Jesse James for Loss of Horse …and Still Lives to Tell About It

Mistaken identity led to murder during the December 7, 1869, robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association. When Jesse James dropped cashier Capt. John Sheets with a bullet, mistaking Sheets for Gallatin’s Samuel P. Cox, James thought he had avenged the death of Confederate guerrilla leader Wm. “Bloody Bill” Anderson. Records show that only about $100 was taken from the simple one-room brick building located on the southwest corner of the Gallatin square.

At the time of the crime, nobody knew with certainty who actually pulled the murderous trigger. In their haste to depart, one of the bandits lost his horse and the bandits escaped southwest toward Cameron by riding double on the remaining mount. Along the way, they encountered a local farmer, Daniel Smoote, and forced a horse exchange. The robbers told Smoote he could have the mare they left behind in Gallatin.

Although the bandits were not recognized, the horseflesh they left behind linked Jesse James to the crime. Soon thereafter, Governor T.T. Crittenden proclaimed a bounty for the arrest of the James brothers — marking the first time Frank & Jesse James were publicly branded as outlaws. Mrs. Sheets, the wife of the murdered bank cashier, offered a reward of $500. Daviess County added $250 for each outlaw, the bank another $500, and the State of Missouri $500 — all a part of the $3,000 total reward offered.

People in those times were known by the horses they kept; horseflesh could be easily recognized by those whose livelihoods and well-being often depended upon horses. Good horses were highly prized. Daniel Smoote wanted his own horse back. And the bay mare he kept – linked to owner Jesse James — was proof enough for Gov. Crittenden to publicly brand Frank & Jesse James as outlaws for the very first time.

Smoote contacted a young Gallatin attorney, H.C. McDougal, to sue the James Boys for damages. McDougal later may have had second thoughts about prosecuting the Jameses.

Gallatin attorney Henry Clay McDougal was just embarking upon his impressive career when he agreed to represent farmer Daniel Smoote in a lawsuit against Jesse James.

In his book entitled, “Recollections,” McDougal relates a harried moment when he thought he might unexpectedly be personally confronted by Jesse James while riding on a train.

As the outlaws became more notorious, McDougal’s worries increased. Ironically, after Jesse’s death in St. Joseph in 1882, McDougal assisted in the prosecution against Frank James during a trial held in Gallatin in 1883.

Soon after that proceeding, McDougal left Gallatin for Kansas City and embarked upon a most fascinating career — a founding partner of what would become the renown law firm Shook, Hardy & Bacon. McDougal also became a personal adviser and confidant for several U.S. presidents.

The complaint, filed on behalf of Daniel Smoote against Frank & Jesse James, cites a loss in damages totaling $223.50.
This summons was issued requiring the James Boys to answer charges made against they by Daniel Smoote in Daviess County.

Neither Frank nor Jesse James appeared in court. Smoote never got his own horse back. Instead, he kept the James’ horse, named Kate, and subsequently raised several colts from her. The Smoote family eventually relocated to Belton, MO, where today the family lies in the Belton Cemetery.

The only civil lawsuit ever recorded against outlaw Jesse James was filed by a Daviess County farmer, Daniel Smoote, who lost his bay mare “Kate” to the robbers as the fled from their crime in Gallatin in December, 1869. This docket was rediscovered on file in the Daviess County in 2007.

A Modern Footnote…

For over 100 years Smoote’s lawsuit against Frank & Jesse James was filed among other legal documents in the Daviess County courthouse …overlooked and eventually forgotten. Historians came to believe that these papers were pilfered by some collector or unscrupulous historian. But the authentic legal documents were rediscovered in August, 2007.

Authentic legal documents were rediscovered in August, 2007, by James Muehlberger, shown here with Daviess County Circuit Clerk Sue Bird.

On Friday, Aug. 17, 2007, James Muehlberger visited Gallatin to expand upon his research of Henry Clay McDougal. Mr. Muehlberger is preparing text and a display about McDougal for the law firm where Muehlberger is employed. Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLC is the largest law firm in Kansas City with additional offices located throughout the United States.

McDougal is primarily remembered as one of the special prosecutors appointed by the governor during the trial of Frank James held in Gallatin in 1883. McDougal is also the connection which enabled the Daviess County Historical Society to secure funds from an estate which now finances ongoing maintenance and limited operation of the county’s 1889 Squirrel Cage Jail as a visitors’ information center. McDougal also was identified by Mr. Muehlberger a partner to his law firm’s founder, Frank Sebree.

During his research, Mr. Meuhlberger immediately recognized the significance of the legal papers and the historic docket was soon whisked away to a local bank vault for safekeeping.

The legal papers have been elusive to those previously researching Jesse James lore. In fact, it was commonly thought that the paperwork on this lawsuit might even have been stolen by some collector or unscrupulous history buff. Circuit Clerk Sue Bird explains that the legal papers weren’t actually misplaced, just filed in a way that made sense to the court clerk of that time.

Now that these authentic historical papers have been found, they will be properly preserved. The Secretary of State’s office has been notified, and archival specialists will soon be involved in that effort.

 

A Scientist You Should Know… Mervin Joe Kelly, GHS 1910 Valedictorian

Few people have impacted the communications world we live in today more than this innovative giant, Mervin Kelly (1894-1971). The 1910 Valedictorian of Gallatin High School was the lab research who eventually became Chairman of the Board at Bell Laboratories.

Mr. Kelly had great intelligence and great force. His work with R.A. Millikan at the University of Chicago gave him a lasting appreciation of the rarity and importance of first-rate scientists and first-rate research. He himself did creditable physical research. Later at the Western Electric Company and at Bell Laboratories (which was not formed until 1925), he did early and important work on vacuum tubes, including research, development, and manufacture. His group increased the life of telephone repeater (amplifier) tubes from 1,000 to 80,000 hours which by 1933 led to a transmitting tube for transatlantic telephony and broadcasting with an unprecedented power of 100,000 watts, and then later to a tube with a power of 250,000 watts.

A visionary firebrand, Kelly directed vacuum-tube R&D at the labs

Mr. Kelly was different. His fundamental belief was that an “institute of creative technology” like his own needed a “critical mass” of talented people to foster a busy exchange of ideas. But innovation required much more than that. Mr. Kelly was convinced that physical proximity was everything; phone calls alone wouldn’t do. Quite intentionally, Bell Labs housed thinkers and doers under one roof. Purposefully mixed together on the transistor project were physicists, metallurgists and electrical engineers; side by side were specialists in theory, experimentation and manufacturing. Like an able concert hall conductor, he sought a harmony, and sometimes a tension, between scientific disciplines; between researchers and developers; and between soloists and groups.

One element of his approach was architectural. He personally helped design a building in Murray Hill, N.J., opened in 1941, where everyone would interact with one another. Some of the hallways in the building were designed to be so long that to look down their length was to see the end disappear at a vanishing point. Traveling the hall’s length without encountering a number of acquaintances, problems, diversions and ideas was almost impossible. A physicist on his way to lunch in the cafeteria was like a magnet rolling past iron filings.

Another element of the approach was aspirational. Bell Labs was some-times caricatured as an ivory tower. But it is more aptly described as an ivory tower with a factory downstairs. It was clear to the researchers and engineers there that the ultimate aim of their organization was to transform new knowledge into new things.

Still another method Mr. Kelly used to push ahead was organizational. He set up Bell Labs’ satellite facilities in the phone company’s manufacturing plants, so as to help transfer all these new ideas into things. But the exchange was supposed to go both ways, with the engineers learning from the plant workers, too. As manufacturing increasingly moved out of the United States during the last half of the 20th Century, it likewise took with it a whole ecosystem of industrial knowledge. But in the past, this knowledge tended to push Bell Labs – and this country – toward new innovations.

“True Innovation”
by Jon Gertner
published Feb 25, 2012, in the The New York Times

Why study Bell Labs? It offers a number of lessons about how our country’s technology companies — and our country’s longstanding innovative edge — actually came about. Yet Bell Labs also presents a more encompassing and ambitious approach to innovation than what prevails today. Its staff worked on the incremental improvements necessary for a complex national communications network while simultaneously thinking far ahead, toward the most revolutionary inventions imaginable.

Indeed, in the search for innovative models to address seemingly intractable problems like climate change, we would do well to consider Bell Labs’ example — an effort that rivals the Apollo program and the Manhattan Project in size, scope and expense. Its mission, and its great triumph, was to connect all of us, and all of our new machines, together.

In his recent letter to potential shareholders of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg noted that one of his firm’s mottoes was “move fast and break things.” Bell Labs’ might just as well have been “move deliberately and build things.” This sounds like the quaint pursuit of men who carried around slide rules and went to bed by 10 o’clock. But it was not.

Consider what Bell Labs achieved. For a long stretch of the 20th century, it was the most innovative scientific organization in the world. On any list of its inventions, the most notable is probably the transistor, invented in 1947, which is now the building block of all digital products and contemporary life. These tiny devices can accomplish a multitude of tasks. The most basic is the amplification of an electric signal. But with small bursts of electricity, transistors can be switched on and off, and effectively be made to represent a “bit” of information, which is digitally expressed as a 1 or 0. Billions of transistors now reside on the chips that power our phones and computers.

Bell Labs produced a startling array of other innovations, too. The silicon solar cell, the precursor of all solar-powered devices, was invented there. Two of its researchers were awarded the first patent for a laser, and colleagues built a host of early prototypes. (Every DVD player has a laser, about the size of a grain of rice, akin to the kind invented at Bell Labs.)

Bell Labs created and developed the first communications satellites; the theory and development of digital communications; and the first cellular telephone systems. What’s known as the charge-coupled device, or CCD, was created there and now forms the basis for digital photography.

Bell Labs also built the first fiber optic cable systems and subsequently created inventions to enable gigabytes of data to zip around the globe. It was no slouch in programming, either. Its computer scientists developed Unix and C, which form the basis for today’s most essential operating systems and computer languages.

And these are just a few of the practical technologies. Some Bell Labs researchers composed papers that significantly extended the boundaries of physics, chemistry, astronomy and mathematics. Other Bell Labs engineers focused on creating extraordinary new processes (rather than new products) for Ma Bell’s industrial plants. In fact, “quality control” — the statistical analysis now used around the world as a method to ensure high-quality manufactured products — was first applied by Bell Labs mathematicians.

So how can we explain how one relatively small group of scientists and engineers, working at Bell Labs in New Jersey over a relatively short span of time, came out with such an astonishing cluster of new technologies and ideas? They invented the future, which is what we now happen to call the present. And it was not by chance or serendipity. They knew something. But what?

At Bell Labs, the man most responsible for the culture of creativity was Mervin Kelly. Probably Mr. Kelly’s name does not ring a bell. Born in rural Missouri to a working-class family and then educated as a physicist at the University of Chicago, he went on to join the research corps at AT&T. Between 1925 and 1959, Mr. Kelly was employed at Bell Labs, rising from researcher to chairman of the board. In 1950, he traveled around Europe, delivering a presentation that explained to audiences how his laboratory worked.

His fundamental belief was that an “institute of creative technology” like his own needed a “critical mass” of talented people to foster a busy exchange of ideas. But innovation required much more than that. Mr. Kelly was convinced that physical proximity was everything; phone calls alone wouldn’t do. Quite intentionally, Bell Labs housed thinkers and doers under one roof. Purposefully mixed together on the transistor project were physicists, metallurgists and electrical engineers; side by side were specialists in theory, experimentation and manufacturing. Like an able concert hall conductor, he sought a harmony, and sometimes a tension, between scientific disciplines; between researchers and developers; and between soloists and groups.

ONE element of his approach was architectural. He personally helped design a building in Murray Hill, N.J., opened in 1941, where everyone would interact with one another. Some of the hallways in the building were designed to be so long that to look down their length was to see the end disappear at a vanishing point. Traveling the hall’s length without encountering a number of acquaintances, problems, diversions and ideas was almost impossible. A physicist on his way to lunch in the cafeteria was like a magnet rolling past iron filings.

Another element of the approach was aspirational. Bell Labs was sometimes caricatured as an ivory tower. But it is more aptly described as an ivory tower with a factory downstairs. It was clear to the researchers and engineers there that the ultimate aim of their organization was to transform new knowledge into new things.

Steven Chu, secretary of the Department of Energy, won a Nobel Prize in 1997 for his work at Bell Labs in the early 1980s. He once said that working in an environment of applied science like Bell Labs “doesn’t destroy a kernel of genius, it focuses the mind.” At Bell Labs, even for researchers in pursuit of pure scientific understanding, it was obvious that their work could be used.

Mr. Kelly believed that freedom was crucial, especially in research. Some of his scientists had so much autonomy that he was mostly unaware of their progress until years after he authorized their work. When he set up the team of researchers to work on what became the transistor, for instance, more than two years passed before the invention occurred. Afterward, when he set up another team to handle the invention’s mass manufacture, he dropped the assignment into the lap of an engineer and instructed him to come up with a plan. He told the engineer he was going to Europe in the meantime.

In sum, he trusted people to create. And he trusted them to help one another create. To him, having at Bell Labs a number of scientific exemplars — “the guy who wrote the book,” as these standouts were often called, because they had in fact written the definitive book on a subject — was necessary. But so was putting them into the everyday mix. In an era before cubicles, all employees at Bell Labs were instructed to work with their doors open.

Saddled with a difficult problem, a new hire there, an anxious nobody, was regularly directed by a supervisor toward the guy who wrote the book. Some young employees would quake when they were told to ask a question of famous mathematicians like Claude Shannon or legendary physicists like William Shockley. Still, Bell Labs’ policy was not to turn them away.

THERE was another element necessary to Mervin Kelly’s innovation strategy, an element as crucial, or more crucial even, than all the others. Mr. Kelly talked fast and walked fast; he ran up and down staircases. But he gave his researchers not only freedom but also time. Lots of time — years to pursue what they felt was essential. One might see this as impossible in today’s faster, more competitive world. Or one might contend it is irrelevant because Bell Labs (unlike today’s technology companies) had the luxury of serving a parent organization that had a large and dependable income ensured by its monopoly status. Nobody had to meet benchmarks to help with quarterly earnings; nobody had to rush a product to market before the competition did.

But what should our pursuit of innovation actually accomplish? By one definition, innovation is an important new product or process, deployed on a large scale and having a significant impact on society and the economy, that can do a job (as Mr. Kelly once put it) “better, or cheaper, or both.” Regrettably, we now use the term to describe almost anything. It can describe a smartphone app or a social media tool; or it can describe the transistor or the blueprint for a cellphone system. The differences are immense. One type of innovation creates a handful of jobs and modest revenues; another, the type Mr. Kelly and his colleagues at Bell Labs repeatedly sought, creates millions of jobs and a long-lasting platform for society’s wealth and well-being.

The conflation of these different kinds of innovations seems to be leading us toward a belief that small groups of profit-seeking entrepreneurs turning out innovative consumer products are as effective as our innovative forebears. History does not support this belief. The teams at Bell Labs that invented the laser, transistor and solar cell were not seeking profits. They were seeking understanding. Yet in the process they created not only new products but entirely new — and lucrative — industries.

There’s no single best way to innovate. Silicon Valley’s methods have benefited our country well over the course of several decades. And it would be absurd to return to an era of big monopolies. Today’s telecom industries are thriving, and customers likewise have access to a dazzling range of affordable devices and services, which most likely would not have been true had the old phone company remained intact. Though it had custody of the world’s most innovative labs, AT&T introduced new products and services slowly, and rarely cheaply. As Time magazine once put it, “Few companies are more conservative; none are more creative.”

But to consider the legacy of Bell Labs is to see that we should not mistake small technological steps for huge technological leaps. It also shows us that to always “move fast and break things,” as Facebook is apparently doing, or to constantly pursue “a gospel of speed” (as Google has described its philosophy) is not the only way to get where we are going. Perhaps it is not even the best way. Revolutions happen fast but dawn slowly. To a large extent, we’re still benefiting from risks that were taken, and research that was financed, more than a half century ago.

Gunsmith Valentine Shuler (1808-85)

Walk any cemetery and be reminded that behind every marker lies a story. Among the older markers in Daviess County is one in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Jamesport, where rests a man once nationally known for his craftsmanship in making guns.

Skilled craftsmanship was evident in everything Valentine Shuler created.

Valentine Shuler (1808-1885) was born in Pennsylvania, married a girl from Ohio, and eventually died in Missouri. Today Shuler’s work still lives on among the guns featured in the book, “Ohio Gunsmiths & Allied Tradesmen” (by Donald A. Hutslar, published by the Association of Ohio Long Rifle Collectors, page 125). Some of the finest guns ever made in Ohio were from Valentine’s hand. There are dozens of surviving “Shuler Rifles” still in the marketplace although most of these are not at all like the “family gun.”

A gunsmith of national renown was Valentine Shuler (1808-1885), member of the famous Ohio family, who last resided in Jamesport, MO.

In a ledger covering the period 1837-45 there is evidence that Valentine Shuler was not only filling orders for guns but was also training apprentices. The ledger lists 33 special orders, though to be custom made guns rather than guns sold from stock. Prices ranged from $13 to $25. The record also lists the number of balls to a pound, barrel length, half or full stock weight, patch box style plus any special features ordered.

Shuler made patented locks, so if this was desired it was noted. One unusual order called for “German silver butt plate eight pieces of silver, brass around lock plate and patch box with spring hook.” The price was $20.

Information compiled by John Shuler, the great-great grandson of the gunsmith, includes comments describing four family guns that he owns. He writes:

“All four guns are different, so he (Valentine) expressed his artistic ability in different ways. He signed all of his guns apparently. Three that I own have Valentine Shuler on the barrel in block letters and the fourth and earliest is signed in script on the barrel and the lock plate has a script signature lus New Phila. Two that don’t have his handmade lock with ‘R&W.C. Biddle & Co., Philadelphia’ on the plate…

“One of the Valentines I have was made in Missouri. Many of its features reflect the change from Ohio to Missouri style and he was obviously affected by the Hawkins style plains rifles that were in demand there.”

The Shuler name is a familiar family name to Daviess County. Darwin Shuler (1898-1977) resided at Gallatin, north of the present day Eugene Taul residence at the east end of East Grand Street. Darwin Shuler was featured by photograph in the Daviess County History (published 1985, page 487). His genealogical records and personal memories help describe Valentine Shuler, the gunsmith of national renown.

Valentine Shuler was the great-grandson of Franz Schuller, a German who settled his family, associated with the German Reformed Church, in Berks County, PA. His son, Johann Valentine Schuller (1759-1833) was a renowned calligrapher whose works are treasured in numerous archives. About 1817 Schuller and his wife moved to Licking County, OH. The future master gunsmith was one of the couple’s six children. He was age 8.

By 1830 Valentine Shuler had developed a considerable gunsmithing trade and was co-owner of a sawmill. In 1853 after his first wife’s death, Valentine remarried and moved to Chillicothe, MO, in 1861. Four years later he relocated to Jamesport, acquiring small parcels of land and a homestead with his sons William David, Martin Banes, and Ulysses Franklin.

This marks the resting place of Valentine Shuler (18-8-1885) in Mt. Zion Cemetery at Jamesport, MO.

Valentine combined gunsmithing and farming, amassed a small personal library, and left behind scant papers in intermingled German and English. One of his sons, William David, lived on the same Jamesport farm for 67 years – continuing some gunsmithing and locksmithing while working as a railroad clerk and in local schools. William Shuler was the last of the Shuler gunsmiths in the lineage of craftsmen who worked in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Missouri for approximately 200 years.


Who taught whom?

The succession the craft of the gunsmith through the generations is often a matter of speculation rather than fact, since surviving documentation is so rare. This is certainly true for the Ohio Shuler Gunsmiths. Some surmise that Johann Valentin Schuller was a gun maker and, if so, it is reasonable to assume he trained Johannes (John) in Northumberland County, PA, before moving to Ohio. Johannes was approximately 23 and married with one son when he moved with his father to Licking County. If the old man did not do it, certainly Johannes was old enough to have trained his younger brothers, Daniel and Valentine. Also, Valentine passed the trade on to at least two nephews and one son.

How many guns made?

Don Shuler notes that a fine small lane, marked “J. Shuler,” has been passed down through the family. It has a numbering system of carefully inscribed grooves and hatches, and it stops at number “193.” This has the family this is the number of guns made by Johannes (John) Shuler over his lifetime. It is unknown how many total guns were made by the Ohio Shuler Gunsmiths.

Nameplates like this marked the craftsmanship and authentic work of Valentine Shuler

USN Capt. James A. Shreckengaust

Vietnam War veteran James A. Shreckengaust is among those from Daviess County achieving high military rank. The native of Pattonsburg (PHS Class of 1954) retired after 34 years as a captain in the United States Navy.

Although he had many assignments, Shreckengaust was most proud of being the commanding officer of the military sea lift command in the Indian Ocean and Executive Officer of the USS Oklahoma City, Seventh Fleet Flagship home ported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Shreckengaust received his Bachelors of Mechanical Engineering from the University of Missouri and his Master’s in Computer Systems Management from the Naval Post Graduate School.

He was born Sept. 12, 1937, to Ralph and Vera (Campbell) Shreckengaust in Daviess County. He married Shirlene Huntsberger on Dec. 23, 1962. The couple raised three daughters, Jill Simmons (Dennis), Virginia Beach, VA; Robyn Lakamsani (Vamsee), Livermore, CA; and Karen Hanley (Michael), Austin, TX.; and have four grandchildren, Alexandra and Katherine Simmons and Sarada and Hansa Lakamsani. His sister is Reva Lupfer, McFall, MO.

He died Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, at Heartland Regional Medical Center in St. Joseph, MO.

Commander James A. Shreckengaust, the commanding officer of the military sea lift command in the Indian Ocean and Executive Officer of the U.S.S Oklahoma City, Seventh Fleet Flagship home ported in Yokosuka, Japan. Shreckengaust, 76, of St. Joseph, MO, died on Feb. 26, 2014, at Heartland Regional Medical Center. He is buried at Leavenworth National Cemetery.

Distinguished Flying Cross to Capt. Jim Sears, Jr. for Heroism Against Taliban

Awarded for actions during the Global War on Terror

General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Central Command Air Force (USCENTAF), Special Orders G-334 (August 21, 2002)

Distinguished Flying Cross

Action Date: January 20, 2002
Service: U.S. Air Force
Rank: Captain
Company: 18th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross with Combat “V” to Captain James R. Sears, Jr., United States Air Force, for heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as F-16CG flight lead, 18th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron on 20 January 2002.

Captain Sears distinguished himself as On Scene Commander for a downed CH-53 in a heavily defended area of Taliban control in Northern Afghanistan during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. During the Combat Search and Rescue he organized, directed, and controlled a total of 13 aircraft including three Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, five helicopters, one C-130, two F-16s, and two F-18s. He rapidly developed a deconfliction plan that ensured the safety of all assets and allowed them to operate within a five nautical mile radius of the downed helicopter. After receiving the initial coordinates of the crash site he realized they were over one nautical mile off the actual location in heavily mountainous terrain.

After a diligent, methodical search of the area, Captain Sears was able to get his eyes on the site, provide a perfect talk-on for his wingman, and direct the other support assets to the crash site. Using on-board sensors, Captain Sears was quickly able to pass updated coordinates to the thousandth of a degree to command and control agencies without compromising the safety of the entire rescue operation. He expertly sanitized the 60 nautical mile ingress and egress route through enemy territory.

Captain Sears then executed the demanding task of rescue escort for two helicopters. This involved maintaining visual contact and constant coverage while flying over 300 knots faster and being 15,000 feet higher than the helicopters. Captain Sears, in conjunction with command and control assets, coordinated a plan to move three separate tankers close enough to the crash site to ensure constant command for the entire time on scene.

Captain Sears’ flawless flight leadership allowed him to intercept and visually identify a Red Cross aircraft flying in the vicinity of the downed helicopter, not identifiable by electronic means or talking to command and control assets, ensuring the safety of the entire rescue effort. Captain Sears passed off On Scene Commander duties to two United States Navy F-18s after 4.5 hours on scene.

Captain Sears’ tireless efforts and tremendous focus was unprecedented considering in his single-seat F-16 he flew more than 3500 miles, logged 11.1 hours, and ten air refuelings requiring more than 120,000 pounds of fuel to be onloaded through hostile territory. Captain Sears’ courage, superior airmanship, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of personal danger were instrumental in accomplishing this hazardous mission and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force.

[Source: http://valor.militarytimes.com/recipient.php?recipientid=5557]

Gallatin’s Dr. Larry Dickinson Awarded Family Physician of the Year (2017)

Larry Dickinson, D.O., family physician in Gallatin, was awarded the 2017 Osteopathic Family Physician of the Year Award by the Missouri Society of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians (MSACOFP).

Dr. Dickinson was honored at a ceremony on Jan. 28, 2017, at the Hilton Garden Inn in Independence, MO, during the 2017 MSACOFP Winter Scientific Seminar. The prestigious award is given to an osteopathic family physician who exemplifies the principles of osteopathic family medicine via outstanding accomplishments and service for the betterment of the osteopathic profession. He was nominated by John R. Sparks, D.O.

Dr. Larry Dickinson, Gallatin

Dr. Dickinson is a 1975 graduate of A.T. Still University – Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, MO. He has been in private practice for over 40 years and is an active staff member at Hedrick Medical Center in Chillicothe. He is board certified in family medicine by the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians. Dr. Dickinson has been active with the MSACOFP for many years and served on the Board of Governors from 2010-2012.

Dr. Dickinson also served the Missouri Association of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (MAOPS) on its Board of Trustees and as a delegate at its House of Delegates.

Larry grew up on the family farm in “beautiful downtown Carlow” in Daviess County and they still own the farm.

Growing up on the farm, Larry dealt with runts and sickly animals on a regular basis. And he found that if he took care of them, they usually lived. And when they lived, they became his property. “I made money that way,” he said. He was actually born at Hedrick Medical Center and graduated from Gallatin R-5 High School in 1968.

His experience with small animals made him a hero to his young children when he saved their ailing pets, at one time even using an IV to care for a small dog with a flailed chest. The dog lived to a ripe old age.

Dr. Dickinson stopped delivering babies in 2004, due to the high cost of malpractice insurance. With malpractice insurance so high, after 28 years and roughly 2,000 deliveries (1,864 after coming to Gallatin, not counting the babies delivered in training), he made the decision to quit.

The last baby he delivered was on Nov. 10, 2004. He recalls that all of the OB nurses at Hedrick gathered for that last delivery, just to mark the milestone. There were so many nurses in the room that the mother asked if it was normal to have so many. But they were celebrating his last delivery. “Quitting was like withdrawal,” he said. “And we had an empty nest at the same time.”

When Dr. Dickinson first started his practice, there were eight physicians in Daviess County alone, and there were seven doctors making deliveries at Hedrick in 1976.

Larry and Patty met while he was in medical school at Kirksville. Patty was working toward a degree in Special Ed and Learning Disabilities. Larry graduated on June 4, 1975, and the two were married three days later.

Patty spent some time in her chosen profession. She set up the K-12 programs for Special Ed and Learning Disabilities in Ashley, Michigan, Bowling Green, Missouri, and Gallatin, where she taught for three years.

But when Larry needed help at his office in Gallatin, Patty volunteered. They’ve worked in tandem since 1976. “We were newlyweds,” said Larry. “And we just didn’t see much of each other.”

The benefits of working together are many. “When you get home you don’t have to tell the story over again. She already knows it,” said Larry.

Together, Larry and Patty delivered 14 babies in his office. “She can hand me the right instruments, while holding a baby on her hip … at 1 a.m. in the morning. She is very adept!” Patty stayed at home for a few years when their kids were small, but then started bringing them to the office, the best kind of daycare … with both mom and dad around.

Larry and Patty built their home east of Gallatin on Highway O in 1989.

Both of the Dickinsons’ children have pursued careers in the medical field. Their son Patrick and his wife Ashley reside in Valparaiso, Ind. Patrick is in anesthesia as a CRNA and Ashley is the Chief Operating Officer of Porter Hospital in Valparaiso. Kari and her husband Eric Genenbacher reside in Mesa, Ariz., where they are busy with Eric’s dental practice and raising their daughter Reese and son Rhett.

Since Dr. Dickinson’s office is equidistant between four hospitals, many trauma victims are actually brought to his office to stabilize. He has dealt with many industrial accidents, as well as agricultural accidents.

“If you do what you’re trained to do, I can’t imagine not being kind and genuine as part of this vocation. It’s second nature, because it helps a lot of people more than medicine, especially patients who are terminal or have a disease that can’t be cured. And I always tell my young mothers that I don’t mind if they call me at home, because we’re both more comfortable knowing that the baby is ok. And it is great to have the privilege of taking care of five generations of a family, too.”

In 1983, the Columbia Missourian did a story on Dr. Dickinson, because his name kept cropping up in the university’s sociology studies concerning country doctors and doctor shortages. He has a long list of professional osteopathic affiliations on his resume. He served as Hedrick’s chief of staff in 1987, 2000 and 2005, as well as many other positions there. He served on the Board of Directors of Hedrick Medical Center from 1993-2003, and on the board of Grand River Medical System – St. Luke’s Health System from 2003 to 2005. He was the 1993 Missouri Emergency Medical Service Association “Physician of the Year.” He is also affiliated with Wright Memorial Hospital in Trenton and Daviess County Nursing and Rehab.

Dr. Dickinson may have been the last person to do family practice and OB, because that’s very uncommon now. But he still takes care of babies. The hours are not quite as long now. He doesn’t have to go to the hospital every day, so he can have office calls in the morning.

“I need to write a book,” Larry said. “My stories aren’t always sad or funny, but they’re good solid memories of 40 years. One night I parked in a different spot at the hospital, and the staff got concerned. I had put in a long night and had simply disappeared to take an hour’s nap, but I got in trouble for moving my parking spot!”

Dr. Dickinson’s most recent honor is from the MSACOFP, a network of osteopathic family physicians dedicated to providing the finest family medical care in Missouri. The mission of the MSACOFP is to preserve and promote the distinct philosophy and practice of osteopathic family medicine by advancing quality education, leadership and responsible advocacy. The MSACOFP actively works to defend and protect the rights and interests of the osteopathic family physician.

In Dr. Dickinson’s words to the Society:  “I would like to thank my wife and children for their support in allowing me to live this dream. All I’ve ever asked was the love and respect of my patients and my community. Now to be recognized by my peers; all I can say is, I humbly thank you.”

[Portions of this story were taken from an article printed in the Gallatin North Missourian in September, 2006, when Larry and Patty were chosen to be grand marshals in the Daviess County Chautauqua parade.]

USAF Brig. Gen. Jim Sears Returns After Counterterrorism Command Overseas

Air Force Brig. Gen. Jim Sears, who commanded the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing (AEW) at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan for the last 12 months, returned home to the United States on June 4, 2017.

The Gallatin Class of 1987 graduate took a military flight to Qatar, located next to Saudi Arabia and across from Iran in the Persian Gulf, then changed to a commercial flight to Miami to later arrive in San Antonio, TX, late on Sunday. The trip home took 27 hours.

Sears will continue his Air Force career as the Director of Intelligence, Operations, and Nuclear Integration, Headquarters Air Education and Training Command, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, TX.

Brig. Gen. Jim Sears on an F-16 while in counterterrorism duty in Afghanistan (2016)

The 455th AEW is considered as the premier counterterrorism air mission in Afghanistan. The wing’s operations enable the NATO Resolute Support mission to successfully train, advise, and assist the military and security forces of Afghanistan, while restricting and deterring the terrorist threat in the region.

During his time at Bagram Airfield, Brig. Gen. Sears’ leadership enabled 15,800 combat sorties, accumulating to 102,877 combat hours. This resulted in more than 1,369 kinetic strikes and 2,836 enemies killed in action.

These details were reported on the website of the U.S. Air Forces Central Command where Sears thanked his family for their sacrifice the last year. He also thanked the airmen who project airpower every day as he departed from command duty in Afghanistan.

“Commanding in combat truly has been the greatest honor in my career,” said Brig. Gen. Sears.

“There are U.S. and coalition forces that were able to go back and hug their families because airmen were there when they needed them. Because of [455th AEW] airmen like you, there are fewer terrorists in the world today. I am tremendously proud of what you do every day to protect America.

“Thank you for your service and I thank your families for their sacrifices today and every day, so we can successfully conduct counterterrorism operations and enable the train, advise, and assist campaign with our Afghan partners. America is safer because of you.”

Sears’ replacement, Brig. Gen. Craig Baker, took command of the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing during a change of command ceremony June 3, 2017, at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Baker is a command pilot with more than 2,600 flying hours and has commanded at the Squadron and Wing level.

In 2015 USAF Col. James R. Sears, Jr., was nominated for appointment to the grade of brigadier general as announced by U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter. At that time Sears was serving as the director for assignments and air expeditionary force operations, Air Force Personnel Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, TX.

This promotion is one of many during a distinguished military career.

Prior to his current assignment Sears was the 14th Flying Training Wing Commander where he led more than 3,000 Airmen and civilians in conducting Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training for US Air Force and allied officers. The wing possessed the largest fleet of aircraft in the Air Force inventory with 222 aircraft and produced more than one-third of all USAF pilots.

Colonel Sears was commissioned in 1991 as a graduate from the United States Air Force Academy. He has commanded at multiple levels and held staff assignments at Pacific Air Forces and U.S. European Command. He is a command pilot with over 3,200 flight hours and operational experience from C-130 low level special operations to every conventional mission in the F-16.

In 2003 he was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism after successfully leading an 11.3 hour combat search and rescue that resulted in the safe recovery of seven US Marines in a downed helicopter in Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Jim Sears, Jr., with father, Jim Sears, Sr.

Brig. Gen. Sears and his wife, Vikki, have two daughters. His father, Jim Sr., and wife Gina, live in Arizona. The elder Sears owned and operated Pill Box Pharmacy, once located on the east side of the Gallatin business square, for several years.

The following career milestones were current for Brig. Gen. Jim Sears, Jr., as of August, 2014:

EDUCATION

  • 1991 Bachelor of Science in Political Science, United States Air Force Academy 1997 Master of Arts in Human Resource Development, Webster University
  • 1998 Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.
  • 2003 Air Command and Staff College, by correspondence
  • 2005 Air War College, by correspondence
  • 2006 Master of Science in Joint Campaign Planning and Strategy, Joint Advanced Warfighting School, National Defense University
  • 2011 Leadership Development Program, Center for Creative Leadership
  • 2012 Executive Leadership Development Program, Darden School of Business, University of VirginiaASSIGNMENTS
  • August 1991 – September 1992, Student, Undergraduate Pilot Training, Williams AFB, Ariz.
  • October 1992 – January 1993, Student, C-130 Replacement Training Unit, Little Rock AFB, Ark.
  • January 1993 – December 1995, C-130 Aircraft Commander, Special Operations Low-Level II Pilot, and mission scheduler, 40th and 41st Airlift Squadrons, Pope AFB, N.C.
  • December 1995 – March 1998, assistant chief of standardization and evaluation, T-3A Instructor Pilot and Flight Examiner, 557th Flying Training Squadron, United States Air Force Academy, Colo.
  • April 1998 – Jun 1999, Student, F-16 Replacement Training Unit, Luke AFB, Ariz.
  • July 1999 – April 2002, Wing Training and Life Support Officer, Flight Commander, and F-16 Mission Commander, 18th Fighter Squadron, Eielson AFB, Alaska
  • May 2002 – April 2003, Assistant Director of Operations, F-16 Instructor Pilot and Flight Examiner, 35th Fighter Squadron, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea
  • April 2003 – June 2005, Deputy Director, Pacific Air Forces Commander’s Action Group, Hickam AFB, Hawaii
  • July 2005 – June 2006, Senior Developmental Education Student, Joint Advanced Warfighting School, Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
    July 2006 – July 2007, Chief of Wing Safety, 56th Fighter Wing, Luke AFB, Ariz.
  • July 2007 – October 2008, Commander, 61st Fighter Squadron, Luke AFB, Ariz.
  • October 2008 – August 2010, Special Assistant to the SACEUR and Commander, USEUCOM, Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe, Belgium
  • August 2010 – June 2012, Commander, 20th Operations Group, Shaw AFB, S.C.
  • June 2012 – July 2014, Commander, 14th Flying Training Wing, Columbus AFB, Miss.
  • July 2014 – Present, Director of Assignments and AEF Operations, Headquarters Air Force Personnel Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Tex.

FLIGHT INFORMATION
Rating: Command Pilot
Flight hours: More than 3200
Aircraft flown: C-130E, T-3A, F-16 blocks 25-50, and T-38C

MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS:
Legion of Merit with one oak leaf cluster
Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor Device
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters
Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters
Aerial Achievement Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters

EFFECTIVE DATES OF PROMOTION:
Second Lieutenant May 29, 1991
First Lieutenant May 29, 1993
Captain May 29, 1995
Major April 1, 2002
Lieutenant Colonel March 1, 2006
Colonel October 1, 2009

Dr. Lee Rogers, One of America’s Leading Podiatrists, Receives Award in Scotland

Dr. Lee Rogers (GHS Class of 1996) was named this month as one of America’s Most Influential Podiatrists by Podiatry Management magazine for his national leadership, research, and advocacy in prevention of amputations from diabetes.

His notable accomplishments included more than 150 published papers, articles, and book chapters on the subject, and he has delivered more than 400 lectures worldwide.  He currently serves as the medical director of the Amputation Prevention Centers of America, part of a company overseeing 200 wound care and limb salvage centers in 34 states.

Rogers said, “Every 30 seconds, somewhere in the world a limb is lost as a consequence of diabetes.  And after amputation, the prognosis is poor, 70% will die within 5 years.”  Yet, the World Health Organization estimates that 80% of diabetes-related amputations are preventable.

In a seminal paper, “The Right to Bear Legs, an Amendment to Healthcare,” Rogers explained how foot problems make up roughly one-third of the total cost of diabetes in the United States and how simple, inexpensive measures could save the healthcare system billions of dollars.  In 2016, the three national thought-leaders on the diabetic foot, including Rogers, founded a company to aid health insurance companies and governments to improve care and reduce costs related to the diabetic foot.

In 2011 in Paris, France, Rogers led the International Consensus on the Charcot foot, a rare but devastating complication in the diabetic foot frequently leading to amputation.  Rogers’s subsequent manuscript, “The Charcot foot in diabetes,” is now the most frequently referenced paper on the topic.

Dr. Lee Rogers

In June, Lee was selected as a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Glasgow, Scotland for his international work in diabetes complications.  Fewer than 20 American podiatrists have been admitted to the Royal College in its more than 400-year history.

Dr. Rogers has been quoted by the Wall Street Journal, US News and World Report, the Washington Post, and he’s appeared as a guest on ABC’s The Doctors, PBS’s American Medical Journal, and Al Jazeera International’s The Cure.  His work in diabetic amputation prevention has brought him to all 50 states and more than 30 countries.

Dr. Rogers is the son of Madelynn and Steve Adkison, Jameson, and the late Bob Rogers. His mother once owned and operated Sandman Motel in Gallatin; Bob Rogers owned and operated Skakey’s Place restaurant and also served as Gallatin mayor.

 

Alexander M. Dockery — A Chillicothe perspective

Alexander M. Dockery is buried beneath a red marble obelisk that towers 15 feet or so into the air at Edgewood Cemetery in Chillicothe. But Gallatin claims Dockery as a native son because he was born in a log cabin on Honey Creek, five miles south of Gallatin on Feb. 11, 1845. He moved back to Gallatin when he was almost 30 years old and made a fortune from founding and serving as cashier of Farmer’s Exchange Bank in Gallatin.

Dockery moved around frequently as a child because his father, Willis E. Dockery, was an itinerant Methodist Episcopal preacher. His mother, Sarah Ellen Dockery, weary of the frequent moves, finally insisted that Willis buy the family a permanent home in Chillicothe. Many of Dockery’s boyhood years were spent in Chillicothe.

Dockery graduated from St. Louis Medical College in 1865, just a month before the official end of the Civil War. He practiced for three years in Linneus. In 1868, he moved his practice to Chillicothe.

On April 14, 1869, he married Mary Bird, daughter of Chillicothe banker Greenup Bird and they made their home in Chillicothe. As a young doctor, Dockery advanced himself quickly. He served as Livingston County physician from 1870 to 1874, as president of the Chillicothe Board of Education from 1871 to 1873, and in 1972 was selected as a member of the board of curators for the University of Missouri.

In March, 1874, at the age of 29, Dockery went into a business partnership with Chillicothe druggist Thomas Bootin Yates. Both men moved their families to Gallatin, and they bought the private banking house of Armstrong & Thompson, changing the name to Farmer’s Exchange Bank. Yates served as president and Dockery as cashier. The bank prospered until late into the 20th century. Charlie Litton served on the bank board for many years.

Dockery served as a Gallatin city councilman from 1879 to 1883, when he was made mayor. That same year he was elected to Congress for this district. He served as U.S. representative until 1899, a not-too-shabby 16 years. In 1901, he was elected as Missouri governor and served one term. Beginning in 1913, he served six years as an assistant U.S. postmaster for this area.

— written in 2002 by Dave Kinnamon,
staff writer for the Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune

Maj. Samuel P. Cox — A County Legend

The adventures of Major S.P. Cox (1828-1913) read like a history of our nation including the westward movement, the Mexican War, the West’s early Indian wars, the California gold rush, the Civil War, and the exploits the notorious outlaws Frank & Jesse James.

The adventures of Major S.P. Cox (1828-1913) read like a history of our nation including the westward movement, the Mexican War, the West’s early Indian wars, the California gold rush, the Civil War, and the exploits the notorious outlaws Frank & Jesse James.

Samuel Cox of Gallatin, MO

Samuel Cox was born on Dec. 16, 1828, at Williamsburg in Whitley County, KY. He moved to Daviess County, MO, in 1839 with his father, Franklin Cox. The family settled in the southeastern part of the county near the old Ames Saw Mill and Trosper Lake.

Enlisting in the U.S. Army at age 19, Cox was among the Missouri volunteers ordered to help develop the Oregon Trail and Mormon Trail and to protect the Santa Fe Trail. In 1848 he helped complete Fort Kearney, located on the south side of the Platte River in what later became Nebraska.

Cox settled in Gallatin, MO, in 1850, married and worked four years in the mercantile business. Then, with oxen and cattle, he moved his family to Oroville, CA, to work as a teamster for gold diggers. The family prospered but yearned to return to Missouri. So, they sold out and went to San Francisco where they were attracted to a steam ship voyage, a route with Baltimore as a destination by way of Nicaraugua. The family survived a shipwreck near Key West, FL.

In 1859 Cox drew national newspaper publicity for an extraordinary feat. While delivering Army dispatches, Cox covered over 1200 miles in 30 days by mule! His trek from Salt Lake City, Utah, to Nebraska City, NE, included one leg of 125 miles without a stop to avoid hostile Sioux warriors led by Red Cloud. Cox’s feat compares favorably against horseback rides in relay — and he was a lone rider without companions or support, other than two good mules.

Cox was among the first to publicly declare for the Union soon after the start of the Civil War in 1861. He promptly recruited and commanded “Cox’s Battalion.” He fought guerrillas at Kirksville (Adair County), Lee’s Ford (Chariton County), and Union Mills (Platte County).

Daviess County Savings Association, located on the southwest corner of the Gallatin business square

After the war, the infamous James Gang robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association occurred on Dec. 7, 1869. The murder of cashier John Sheets vaulted Frank and Jesse James onto the wanted list for the very first time and marked the beginning of an assault against law and order of international interest. Samuel P. Cox was a central player in the outlaws’ early plot.

Inscription on the ceremonial saber presented to Lt. Col. Samuel P. Cox of St. Joseph reads: “Presented to Lt. Col. Samuel P. Cox, 33 Inf. Missouri militia, from the Citizens of Gallatin, Mo., Dec. 25, 1864”
Daviess County Historical Society acquired a ceremonial saber and pistol in May, 1992. The saber was given in gratitude for his wartime services. The pistol is a Remington .44 six-shot U.S. Army revolver, authentic and thought to be used by Cox although not of a quality to interest gun collectors. The Remington is from an estimated quantity of 132,000 issued between 1803 and 1875, and was considered the stiffest competitor to Colt’s Model 1860 Army revolver. A leather holster complete with brass Army buckle was also acquired. (Cox obituary, published August, 1913, in the Gallatin Democrat)

Union Major Samuel P. Cox gained widespread fame when he was credited with the killing of William “Bloody Bill” Anderson on Oct. 27, 1864, near Richmond, MO. The City of St. Joseph presented Cox with a ceremonial sword for killing the notorious guerrilla chief (accused of killing 54 Union men). Few knew Major Cox was actually protecting a bugler under his command, Adolph Vogel, who in all probability pulled the trigger that sent Bloody Bill to his death. Vogel was a young family man, mindful of revenge sworn by Jesse James and other guerrillas against whomever killed their leader. So, as commanding officer, Major Cox assumed that personal risk for years after the Civil War …a risk that became bloody reality when the James brothers later robbed the savings association in Gallatin.

Artist’s concept of the shooting of Capt. John Sheets

Jesse James swore he would avenge the death of Wm. “Bloody Bill” Anderson whenever he next saw Samuel P. Cox. Thus, during the 1869 robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association, John W. Sheets was an unfortunate victim of circumstance when Jesse James mistook him for Samuel Cox. A horse used during the robbery and murder linked Jesse James to the crime. The Governor of Missouri soon offered a bounty for the capture of the outlaw. This was the first time Jesse James was publicly wanted by the law, the start of a 12-year crime spree.

Ironically, a James Gang member, Clelland Miller, was a friend to Cox and actually saved the Major’s life during the Civil War.

The case can be made for Samuel Cox to top our list of military leaders from Daviess County. His escapades and achievements need no embellishment.

In 1862 Major Cox served the county as recorder and circuit clerk. In 1874 he was collector for Union Township.

If Cox wasn’t particularly interested in business, he certainly knew how to pick business partners. Local records show a mercantile business at the southeast corner of the Gallatin square called Ballinger, Cox & Kemper. It operated a little more than a year, long enough for the birth of William T. Kemper. The Kemper family fortune became one of Kansas City’s largest. The family controls one of Missouri’s largest financial institutions, United Missouri Bank of Kansas City, and the Kemper name is lavished on Kansas City’s civic arena. By the way, the real estate for the business in Gallatin was purchased by the three partners for $1,500. Evidently, business was good. Partner John Ballinger later purchased Kemper’s interest for $1,250.

Samuel P. Cox died on Aug. 21, 1913, a man who lived history in legendary fashion. He is buried at Brown Cemetery, on the north side of Gallatin.

— written by Darryl Wilkinson, Gallatin North Missourian editor & publisher

Dick Paul retires as USAF 2-Star General

Richard R. Paul retired from the USAF on June 1, 2000, as a Major General in command of Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He directed the Air Force’s $1.4 billion science and technology program which was executed by more than 6,000 people in the laboratory’s component technology directorates and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Richard R. Paul (GHS Class of 1962) retired from the USAF on June 1, 2000, as a Major General in command of Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He directed the Air Force’s $1.4 billion science and technology program which was executed by more than 6,000 people in the laboratory’s component technology directorates and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

The general planned basic research to ensure continued technological superiority; developed and transitioned new technologies for Air Force weapon systems and their supporting infrastructure; and ensured responsive technical support to time-urgent problems whenever and wherever they occurred.

Paul previously commanded the Wright Laboratory which involved a work force of over 2,500 people at Dayton, including 1,700 scientists and engineers. This was the largest aerospace laboratory complex in the Air Force prior to the 1997 formation of the Air Force Research Laboratory.

A 1962 graduate of GHS, Richard R. Paul retired from the USAF on June 1, 2000, as a Major General in command of Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He directed the Air Force’s $1.4 billion science and technology program which was executed by more than 6,000 people in the laboratory’s component technology directorates and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. The general planned basic research to ensure continued technological superiority; developed and transitioned new technologies for Air Force weapon systems and their supporting infrastructure; and ensured responsive technical support to time-urgent problems whenever and wherever they occurred.
The general entered the Air Force in 1967 as a distinguished graduate of Officer Training School, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He has served in two Air Force laboratories, a product center, two major command headquarters, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C., and a joint staff assignment. Prior to his current assignment, he served as commander of Wright Laboratory, the largest aerospace laboratory complex in the Air Force prior to the 1997 formation of the Air Force Research Laboratory.
His educational pursuits following high school graduation were: 1966 Bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering, University of Missouri at Rolla;
1971 Master of science degree in electrical engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio; 1975 Distinguished graduate, Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.;
1980 Distinguished graduate, Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; 1984 Distinguished graduate, Naval War College, Newport, R.I.
MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal
EFFECTIVE DATES OF PROMOTION
Second Lieutenant May 27, 1967
First Lieutenant Nov 27, 1968
Captain May 2

After graduating from Gallatin High School, Paul achieved a degree in electrical engineering at the University of Missouri at Rolla. He earned a 1971 Master of Science degree in electrical engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. He was a 1975 distinguished graduate of the Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; a 1980 distinguished graduate of the Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; and a 1984 distinguished graduate of the Naval War College, Newport, RI.

His major awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, and the Air Force Commendation Medal.

Major General Paul is the son of the late Robert E. and Jane Ann Paul, former longtime residents of Gallatin, MO. Bob Paul was president of First National Bank, Gallatin, for many years. The general and his wife, Joyce, are the parents of a son, David.

— reprinted from the Gallatin North Missourian

Dick Paul – Gallatin’s Major General

A 1962 graduate of Gallatin R-5 High School was promoted to the rank of Major General in the U.S. Air Force. Dick Paul, son of Bob and Jane Ann Paul, was nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate to become a 2-star general.

A 1962 graduate of Gallatin R-5 High School was promoted to the rank of Major General in the U.S. Air Force. Dick Paul, son of Bob and Jane Ann Paul, was nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate to become a 2-star general.

At the time of his promotion, Paul was assigned as the Director of Science and Technology at Headquarters, Air Force Material Command in Dayton, Ohio. In this capacity, he was responsible for planning the Air Force’s annual $1.5 billion technology program which was carried out in four Air Force research laboratories in Ohio, New York, New Mexico and Texas. Paul previously commanded the Wright Laboratory which involved a work force of over 2,500 people at Dayton, including 1,700 scientists and engineers.

The Air Force’s four laboratories conduct research in areas ranging from advanced materials to lasers to advanced aircraft and rocket engines so that the Air Force can keep the technological edge over potential adversaries. The end of the Cold War brings new technological challenges with respect to reapidly deployig forces from the Unties States to Third World locations and operating for extended periods of time. The labs sponsor extensive research with universities and industries across the country to assure the best minds in the nation are focused on innovative solutions to these problems.

At the time of this promotion, Dick and his wife, Joyce, were living on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton. Their son, David, had just completed paramedic training in New Mexico and was employed as an Emergency Medical Technician in Silver City, NM.

— from the Gallatin North Missourian

Doc Bailey – “Country Doctor”

Dr. H.W. “Doc” Bailey delivered well over 2,000 babies — including one set of triplets and several sets of twins — during decades of service to the people of Daviess County. The longtime Gallatin doctor exemplified the meaning of “country doctor” while establishing himself in the minds of hearts of many, many people throughout the area.

Dr. H.W. “Doc” Bailey delivered well over 2,000 babies — including one set of triplets and several sets of twins — during decades of service to the people of Daviess County. The longtime Gallatin doctor exemplified the meaning of “country doctor” while establishing himself in the minds of hearts of many, many people throughout the area.

Doc Bailey graduated from Kirksville’s School of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery in January, 1937. After a 6-month internship at a Kirksville hospital, he began practice in Gallatin with his father, Dr. M.B. Bailey. His brother, Forrest, practiced medicine in nearby Jamesport and another brother, Carl, worked from medical offices in Urbanna.

Upon his 40th anniversary of practice, Doc Bailey recalled one of his most unusual baby deliveries. One night during 1953 he was attending a movie at the Courter Theater in Gallatin. “A lady went into labor, so I had to deliver the baby on the floor of the theater,” he recalled for an article published in the Gallatin North Missourian. “We then transported mother and child to the hospital by ambulance and both were well and healthy.”

Doc Bailey prided himself in being a country doctor, especially when government policy changes meant fewer medical students focused on rural health care.

“My father and I did surgery on kitchen tables, years ago,” he said. During his decades of service Doc Bailey reached patients by going to their homes by jeep, car, horse and by walking.

Doc Bailey died at Liberty Hospital following a car accident in the spring of 1986. Harold Bailey, 71, was born in Kansas and moved to Gallatin as a youth. He graduated from Gallatin High School and served in the Army Medical Corps during World War II at Camp Barkley. He was a member of Gallatin First Baptist Church. Doc was an avid hunter and fisherman and enjoyed living at Lake Viking. He and his wife, Ruth, were parents to a son, Bob.

— taken from the Gallatin North Missourian

Harfield Davis

H. Harfeld Davis epitomized what it means to be a successful small town businessman. He was born in Gallatin and lived most of his life here. He owned and operated D.H. Davis Drug Company from 1920 until he retired. The drugstore was founded in 1855 by his great-grandfather, Baalis Davis.

H. Harfeld Davis epitomized what it means to be a successful small town businessman. He was born in Gallatin and lived most of his life here. He owned and operated D.H. Davis Drug Company from 1920 until he retired. The drugstore was founded in 1855 by his great-grandfather, Baalis Davis.

Harfield Davis was a Navy veteran of World War I and a member of the American Legion. He was a member of Gallatin Masonic Lodge and of the First Baptist Church of Gallatin. He married Mary Frances Davis, and the couple had one daughter, Susan Ann.

A small man physically, Harfield was successful both professionally and financially because of his dedication and hard work. He worked with his brother, Bob, who was the “public relations man” at the store while Harfield often worked behind the scenes making business decisions and assuring that things ran smoothly. At an early age he learned the benefits of listening and was widely known as a true gentleman, a loving husband and father — besides an uncommon businessman.

For a man whose philosophy never included the waste of time, gardening was his hobby and release from the pressures and stresses of his days.

H. Harfield Davis, 89, died on June 19, 1986, and is buried in Brown Cemetery, Gallatin.

— taken from Post Scripts by Joe Snyder, June, 1986

The Hon. Alexander Dockery

There has hardly been a man, woman or child in northwest Missouri who has not been familiar by constant repition with the name of Alexander M. Dockery, whose career of public service has kept him almost constantly active in district, state and national affairs through an entire generation. For 16 years, Mr. Dockery represented the Third District in Congress, and during the Democratic Administration of President Wilson held the post of third assistant postmaster general.

There has hardly been a man, woman or child in northwest Missouri who has not been familiar by constant repition with the name of Alexander M. Dockery, whose career of public service has kept him almost constantly active in district, state and national affairs through an entire generation. For 16 years, Mr. Dockery represented the Third District in Congress, and during the Democratic Administration of President Wilson held the post of third assistant postmaster general.

His active public service has obscured the fact, except in his home town of Gallatin and among his more intimate friends, that Mr. Dockery began his career as a physician, and besides several other degrees is entitled to the letters, M. D. Governor Dockery, as he is known to all his friends, was born in Daviess County, Feb. 11, 1845. His parents were Rev. WilHs E. and Sarah E. (McHaney) Dockery, his father having been a distinguished minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. Mr. Dockery, who is the only survivor of three children was educated in Macon Academy, Macon, Mo., and in 1863 entered the St. Louis Medical College, and was graduated in March, 1865, with the degree of M. D. He later attended lectures at Bellevue College in New York, and the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia and began his first practice at Linneus, Mo., and from 1867 to 1874 practiced at Chillicothe. He was recognized as a skillful physician.

In March, 1874, having abandoned the medical practice, for other lines of endeavor, Mr, Dockery removed to Gallatin and became associated with Thomas B. Yates in the establishment of the Farmers Exchange Bank, an institution which has had a solid career for nearly 50 years. He served as its cashier until 1882. Prior to his election to Congress, Mr. Dockery served as County Physician of Livingston County from 1870 to 1874, was president of the Board of Education at Chillicothe in 1870-72, was a member of the board of curators of the University of Missouri from 1872 to 1882, and at Gallatin was a member of the city council 1878-81, and mayor during 1881-83. From 1878 until his election to Congress Mr. Dockery was chairman of  the Democratic Congressional Committee of the Tenth District, 1880 was chairman of the Congressional Convention at Brunswick, and in 1882, at the conveniton at Cameron was nominated for representative in Congress. Altogether there were six men in the field for the nomination, and it was one of the most exciting conventions held in that district for many years. The deciding ballot was the 28th. The opposition had been unable to unite, since Mr. Dockery was the second choice in all the counties. His election from the Third District came in November, 1882, and he continued as representative in Congress from March 4, 1883, to March 4, 1899. In the successive conventions Mr. Dockery was renominated without opposition. During his career in Congress Mr. Dockery was a member of the Committee on Claims, Committee on Accounts, Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads four years, and for the last ten years of his service in the house was a member of the Committe on Appropriations and had charge of the District of Columbia and the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Appropriation bills. From 1893 to 1895 he was chairman of what is known as the “Dockery Commission,” which, among other notable achievements, de- vised the present accounting system of the national treasury. This system has been in successful operation since Oct. 1, 1894. During the World Fair at Chicago, he was chairman of a special committee appointed by the House to investigate and simplify methods of business. This committee’s elaborate report served as a basis for the work of organization of the Louisana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. While a member of the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads, Mr. Dockery was instrumental in securing the installation of the second fast mail train service in the United States, from New York to Kansas City by way of St. Louis. In 1886, Mr. Dockery was chosen permanent chairman of the Democratic State Convention at St. Louis. At the conclusion of the eighth term Mr. Dockery declined a renomination in order to enter the race for governor in 1900. He was nominated by acclamation in June of that year, the nomination speech being made by Hon. W. S. Cowherd of Kansas City. In the following November he was elected Governor of Missouri against his opponent, Joseph Flory, of Moberly. Taking his oath as governor, Jan 14, 1901, Mr. Dockery was chief executive of his native state four years. After retiring from the governor’s chair in 1905 he continued active in Democratic politics, being chairman of the state convention in 1906, and in 1912 was elected treasurer of the Democratic State Committee and reelected in 1914. At the beginning of President Wilson’s administration, Mr. Dockery was appointed Third Assistant Postmaster General, his appointment being confirmed by the Senate, March 13, 1913, and he entered upon his duties March 17th. As Third Assistant Postmaster General he had supervision and control of all the extensive fiscal affairs of the postal service, including the postal saving system. In 1906 Governor Dockery was awarded the degree of LL. D. by the University of Missouri. In the interval between his term as governor and his recent promotion to the Postoffice Department, Governor Dockery proved himself a citizen of force and influence in his home city of Gallatin. He served as a member and president of the board of education from 1906 to 1912, was president of the Gallatin Commercial Club from its organization in 1908 to 1914, and was president of the Daviess County Chautauqua Association since its organization in 1909. He was also chairman of the building committee which supervised construction of the new court house, and of the committee which supervised construction of the new Gallatin school house. Of his local activities, Governor Dockery probably takes most pride in his work as ex-officio road overseer in his county, a service which he has performed gratuitously but none the less effectively at various times during the past 30 years. Governor Dockery was married April 14, 1869, to Miss Mary E. Bird, daughter of Greenup Bird. All of the seven children of their marriage died in infancy. His wife died at the Executive Mansion, Jefferson City, January, 1903.

Governor Dockery has some interesting fraternal relations. In 1880 he was elected Eminent Commander of Kadosh Commandery No. 21, Knights Templar, at Cameron; in 1881 was elected Grand Master of Mis- souri Masons; in May 1883, was chosen Grand High Priest of the Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, and since 1886 he has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri, being chairman of the Executive Committee the greater part of the time. In May, 1910, he was elected Grand Master of the Missouri Odd Fellows, and this gives him the unusual distinction of being the only person in the state who has been Grand Master of both Missouri Masons and Missouri Odd Fellows. Beginning May, 1909, he served 12 years as president of the Odd Fellows Home Board at Liberty. Governor Dockery has been a liberal contributor and supporter to the cause of the Y. M. C. A., and is now serving as a director. In July, 1906, Mr, Dockery donated the original land for the City Park which is now known as “Dockery Park,” which now contains 14 acres, located in the northeast part of Gallatin. The Governor is very proud of his work in building up and beautifying this park, which is a valuable asset to the city. He has been president of the Park Board since its organization. The people of Missouri have honored Governor Dockery with their confidence and respect, and have found him worthy. They have trusted in his honesty and integrity, and have always found him true.

HISTORY OF DAVIESS AND GENTRY COUNTIES, MISSOURI. DAVIESS COUNTY BY JOHN C. LEOPARD AND BUEL LEOPARD. ILLUSTRATED. HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, TOPEKA— INDIANAPOLIS. 1922

Buzz Barton — Freckles and All — to Hollywood

William Andrew Lamoreaux — born in Gallatin, MO, on Sept. 3, 1913 — became known as “The Boy Wonder of Westerns” after his family moved to California. At one time he was probably the most successful and well-known of the young, silent screen cowpokes starring in Westerns. But his starring career floundered as he reached puberty and as the new medium of sound put an end to silent films.

William Andrew Lamoreaux — born in Gallatin, MO, on Sept. 3, 1913 — became known as “The Boy Wonder of Westerns” after his family moved to California. At one time he was probably the most successful and well-known of the young, silent screen cowpokes starring in Westerns. But his starring career floundered as he reached puberty and as the new medium of sound put an end to silent films.

Young William took interest in cowboys while growing up in the Newhall movie sets. He became a skilled horse rider and roper by the time he entered into his first film experience at age 13 in 1926. Cowboy star Jack Perrin helped the freckled faced boy get into movies. He appeared in the Rayhart series with Perrin.

During this period, a nationwide emphasis was placed on youth in movies. In 1927, his parents, Floyd and Myrtle Lamoreaux, signed a long-term contract for FBO (later RKO), making him the youngest actor to star in a western series. His name changed to Buzz Barton, and the first release of “The Boy Wonder” soon followed in October. Then followed “The Slingshot Kid” in December. One early reviewer called Barton as a combination Mix, Maynard and Fred Thomson. Even if this was a bit of exaggeration, the following Buzz attracted was not questioned — a popularity that sustained him throughout the remainder of the silent film era.

Most of Buzz’s titles reflect his youth. He had the misfortune (as well as a number of older cowboy stars) of coming on the scene as the silent era was ending. Although his films were good, fast-paced stories, they were not strong enough to endure the changes taking place in Hollywood. The studio dropped him after starring in 14 features. The last one, “Pals of the Prairie,” was released in July, 1929.

Barton still landed a number of roles in westerns during 1930 and 1931. His popularity at the time still remained so strong that the Daisy Company introduced the “Buzz Barton Special Daisy Air Rifle” (complete with tlelscope sight), to tie in with the Big 4 pictures then being released.

William Andrew Lamoreaux (1913-1980), aka Buzz Barton, is one more name linking Gallatin, MO, to the Old West, though only through Hollywood and only by his place of birth.

Gallatin’s Connection to the Search for Amelia Earhart

“Without having had the actual experience, it is hard for one to appreciate just how difficult it is for an observer, flying in an airplane, to ‘spot’ an object afloat at sea.” — Commander Dalton Davis of the U.S. Navy, son-in-law to Gallatin’s Frank Davis speaking to Gallatin Rotary Club about the current hunt for famous aviatrix Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, who were lost in the South Pacific on their attempted flight around the world in 1937.

“Without having had the actual experience, it is hard for one to appreciate just how difficult it is for an observer, flying in an airplane, to ‘spot’ an object afloat at sea.” — Commander Dalton Davis of the U.S. Navy, son-in-law to Gallatin’s Frank Davis speaking to Gallatin Rotary Club about the current hunt for famous aviatrix Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, who were lost in the South Pacific on their attempted flight around the world in 1937.

Commander Davis has been stationed at San Francisco during the year when the world’s interest focused on the search for Amelia Earhart.  The U.S. Navy sent ships to the area where it is believed the fliers were forced down due to a fuel shortage. Commander Davis is intimately acquainted with naval maneuvers on the Pacific.

"It is very difficult to sight objects at sea. In recent maneuvers we (a fleet) left Honolulu to ‘attack’ another fleet that had left Alaskan waters and was headed south. Planes flew 300 miles each way from ships of each fleet, thereby having an observation range of approximately 600 miles …and neither fleet saw the other."

Commander Dalton, who is in the medical department, was the commanding surgeon aboard the USS Richmond when that ship rescued more than 60 survivors from the ill-fated navy dirigible Macon. The captain of the Richmond at that time is now the commanding officer of the aircrafter carrier USS Lexington which is leading the search for Miss Earhart and her companion.

Is it true that it costs the government approximately half a million dollars a day to conduct the search?

"I’ve heard that report," responded Commander Davis. "But it is not exactly true. Although total expenses, taking everything into account may amount to that sum daily, it does not necessarily mean that Miss Earhart’s accident is wholly responsible. The naval fliers have so many hours flying time, and the ships have to maneuver over the water anyhow, so it is little more than routine duty — except, of course, they have a definite object to search for instead of one which has been ‘planted’ and is searched for."

Commander Davis expressed little hope that Earhart and Noonan still survive. "It is doubtful that they set down on any of the small islands in the South Pacific. However, it is evident that if they were on water they at least survived for a few days because radio reports from them were kept up for awhile. The ship in which they were flying could stay up on quiet waters for a time, but I don’t think it could stay afloat long."

Part of the equipment carried by the fliers was a collapsible rubber boat, but it is not known whether they made use of it.

Until recently Davis was a Lt. Commander which ranks below only that of Captain, Rear-Admiral and Admiral in that order. During his 20 years of service he has been stationed all over the world in naval outposts and at sea. Commander Davis and his wife, and their son, Billy, are visiting Gallatin relatives before departing for his new post at Washington, D.C.

Reprinted from the Gallatin Democrat, July 15, 1937

A Freemason’s Memorial to Alexander M. Dockery

W.A. Clark presented and read this Memorial on the late A.M. Dockery which was unanimously adopted and a page set aside on the records, with copies delivered to the Gallatin North Missourian, the Gallatin Democrat, and to newspapers at Kansas City and St. Louis. The memorial reads, in part, as follows:

W.A. Clark presented and read this Memorial on the late A.M. Dockery which was unanimously adopted and a page set aside on the records, with copies delivered to the Gallatin North Missourian, the Gallatin Democrat, and to newspapers at Kansas City and St. Louis. The memorial reads, in part, as follows:

Alexander M. Dockery was born near Gallatin, Daviess County, Missouri, on Feb. 11, 1845. He was the son of a pioneer Methodist minister, and was the only child in the family to live to the years of maturity. He attended the District schools of his native county but so far as is known he was not enrolled at any higher institution of learning.

While still a young man, he enterd medical college from which he graduated and practiced the healing art for some 8 years. The practice of medicine did not appeal to him and he transferred his activitis from this to banking and politics, to which he devoted himself through most of a long life.

When 21 years of age, he joined Jackson Lodge No. 82, and three years later was elected its Master. He afterwards served as the Master of Friendship Lodge No. 89, and Jamesport Lodge No. 201. He was District Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge from his district for 10 years. In 1881 he was elected Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and was elected to the Masonic Home Board in 1886, and was a member of that board continuously until 1926, except 10 years while in Congress.

He served as Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Missouri in 1910. He was a member of Kadosh Commandery No. 21, Knights Templar and was its Commander in 1882. He was anointed to the Order of High Priesthood in 1870. His longest service and probably his greatest interest was in the Masonic Home and the Odd Fellows Home, both of which institutions he was very active for many years.

On Dec. 26, 1926, rich in honor and experience he was “cut down by the scythe of Time and gathered to the land where his Fathers had gone before him.” ‘Tis said that “Death loves a shining mark” and if that be true his arrows found the most conspicuous target that the ranks of Missouri Freemasonry could furnish. Whether Most Wonderful Brother Dockery was the most brilliant and learned Freemason of Missouri might be debated, but that he was the most striking and commanding figure in present day Masonry circles, I think, will be conceded. It is fitting that we should pause for a moment and consider the attributes that made him great — that made him the outstanding figure in Missouri Freemasonry.

High in the list of such an enumeration must be put his zeal for the institution, the progress he made in our mysteries, his unswerving fidelity to the principles of the order, and his wonderful appreciation of the necessity of preserving the ancient landmarks. He stated publicly that he considered being Grand Master of Missouri, if possible, a greater honor than being Governor of the State, and this, after he had held both offices.

He was not an orator as Wendell Phillips or Daniel Webster were. He was not learned in the knowledge of the schools and his addresses carried no ornate or well-rounded periods nor classical allusions, but they were so clearly worded, so sensibly conceived and forcibly expressed that they seldom failed to carry conviction.

One could not know him without acknowledging his exceeding reasonableness — his stock of common sense compensated for any lack of preliminary training. He had an ability to think clearly and an ability to put his thougths in homely but clear, forcible English that carried conviction not only to the man in the street but to the intelligentsia as well.

Among his many most valuable and outstanding abilities was an almost uncanny faculty of forecasting the outcome of political movements; for years he had his fingers on the public pulse and was the first to sense the symptoms of political change and unrest. The arrhythmia and the unusual in the trend of political events came to him as the first murmer of a failing organ might come to the ear of a trained physician before it was noticed by the prossessor himself.

He was a fervent hater of shams, imposture, hypocrisy, false tradition and deception of every kind. In the course of his many political battles his life has been searched with lighted candles, but nothing mean or base was ever detected and he emerged from every conflict with the admiration of his friends and the respect of his opponents.

Dockery represented his state creditably for 16 years in the Congress of the United States and served it faithfully as its Chief Executive for 4 years. Later in life when his country was in the throes of the World War he served the nation as Third Assistant Postmaster General in which capacity he directed the funds of the greatest financial institution in the world. As a citizen he was just to his country, and loyal to his government and in the discharge of his political duties faithful to the limit.

He was a pillar in the church, a political leader and seer in his state, a factor to be reckoned with in the national government, a success in business and yet withal, found time to serve at least two fraternal orders in every position from the most humble to the most exalted.

Written by W.A. Clark in 1927

Mary Edna Cruzen — Efficient Labor Leader

In 1935, Mary Edna Cruzen served on the state labor commission and was director of the Missouri State Employment Service. Her home is at… “Gallatin, MO, seat of what was formerly known as the famous Gallatin dynasty. This appellation originated from the fact that Gallatin has produced more prominent personages in state and national history than almost any other county seat town in Missouri.”

In 1935, Mary Edna Cruzen served on the state labor commission and was director of the Missouri State Employment Service. Her home is at… “Gallatin, MO, seat of what was formerly known as the famous Gallatin dynasty. This appellation originated from the fact that Gallatin has produced more prominent personages in state and national history than almost any other county seat town in Missouri.”

Mary Edna Cruzen, the mother of Rear Admiral Richard Cruzen, is shown here at her home in Gallatin located at 201 East Berry Street. Mrs. Cruzen served as a State Labor Commissioner (1932-36). Source: State Historical Society of Missouri, Columbia.

Her first lessons in practical politics was learned from Alexander Monroe Dockery — a Gallatin doctor and banker elected to Congress representing the Missouri 3rd District for a number of years. “As a congressman, he became a national figure, not because of oratorical flubdubbery but rather because of his practical work on behalf of the people. As a watch dog of the treasury, he had a head for figures that made him a public benefactor to the taxpayers.”

Mrs. Cruzen was a little girl when Dockery was becoming a congressional star but in her more mature years she developed an interest in good government and things political in general, and Dockery found her to be an apt pupil. At that time women were not permitted to vote, but with the coming of sufferage, Mrs. Cruzen, thanks to Dockery, was equipped with a splendid background of information as to the principles of good government and also a keen knowledge of political expediency.

Dockery elevated from his congressional berth to the governorship of Missouri and his name is written high on the scroll of honor in this state’s history. He later occupied a cabinet position in Washington, D.C., and later died while living a few years in retirement.

Another prominent figure from Gallatin was Judge Joshua Alexander, who succeeded Dockery in Congress and served with distinction — eventually called by President Woodrow Wilson to serve in his cabinet as Secretary of Commerce. Judge Alexander was a personal friend of Mrs. Cruzen. Besides Dockery and Alexander, others who went out into the world to bring Gallatin fame were attorney Ed Yates, and Ed Howe known as the “Sage of Potato Hill.” In addition, Mrs. Cruzen was the wife of a prominent Democratic lawyer, who was personally interested in her political success. So, from this rich political background came Mary Edna Cruzen, an interesting and charming woman and a capable executive.

Mary Edna Cruzen

Mrs. Cruzen received her appointment as labor commissioner from Gov. Park on March 14, 1933, in recognition of her work as a member of the Democratic County Central Committee since the time women were given the right to vote.

As a member of the state committee, she was elected vice-chairman and worked seven weeks at the Democratic headquarters in St. Louis during the 1932 campaign. She was called to New York by Mary Dewson, national director of the women’s activities in the interest of the Roosevelt campaign. Later Mrs. Cruzen was appointed director of the Missouri State Employment Service which responsibility is tied up with her work as State Commissioner of Labor.

The industrial inspection department of Mrs. Cruzen’s administration has supervision of inspection of all industrial hazards to employees, enforcemtn of the child labor law, 9-hour law for women, regulating fee-charging employment agencies, and the organization and administration of the Missouri State Employment Service.

Mrs. Cruzen is the author of the better betting bill which is before the legislature at the time of this writing. This proposes to eliminate the use of second hand materials in bedding and upholstering. She became interested in this particular feature of this work during the sleeping sickness epidemic in the City of St. Louis and in St. Louis County in 1933, at which time she carried on correspondence with noted medical men who were studying the cause of sleeping sickness and suggested that investigation had shown that a great amount of second hand material went into bedding sold throughout the state.

The bill regulating fee-charging employment agencies was introduced at her instigation. A desire to protect those seeking employment from excessive fees prompted this bill which seeks only to regulate fee-charging agencies and not to eliminate them.

Under the administration of Mrs. Cruzen, the Missouri State Employment Service, affiliated with the U.S. Employment Service, was developed and when Washington set up the program for placements under the CWA, all placements in Missouri were made through this service. Mrs. Cruzen went to Kansas City and supervised personally the placement of over 9,000 men and women in gainful employment. She did much to increase the efficiency of industrial inspection which reduces to a minimum industrial accidents and loss of life.

The Jefferson City Central Missouri Review described Mrs. Cruzen as follows: “Optimism is one of the chief characteristics of the vivacious Mrs. Cruzen. She has the happy facility of seeing the silver lining in every cloud. She radiates sunshine and inspires cheerfulness in those with whom she is associated. Governor Park is to be congratulated for the splendid judgment he exercised in appointing Mary Edna Cruzen to the responsible place she now occupies in the state government of Missouri.”

Reprinted from the Apri 25, 1935 edition of the Gallatin North Missourian

Theodore Peniston — First to Navigate the Grand for Commerce

Theodore "Uncle Theo" Peniston is due the honor of being the first to utilize the Grand River as a highway for commerce. And before his death in 1892, Peniston passed through two Indian wars, the Mormon War, the Mexican War, the Civil War, and all the incidents connected with them. He was initimately involved with the beginnings of Daviess County and was popular among its people.

Theodore "Uncle Theo" Peniston is due the honor of being the first to utilize the Grand River as a highway for commerce. And before his death in 1892, Peniston passed through two Indian wars, the Mormon War, the Mexican War, the Civil War, and all the incidents connected with them. He was initimately involved with the beginnings of Daviess County and was popular among its people.

Theodore was but 19 years old when he came to Grand River country. When Black Hawk organized the Sacs and Fox and went on the warpath,Theodore Peniston, in company with others, enlisted as scouts and did good service in patroling Northern Missouri and Southern Iowa until Black Hawk and his band were exterminated.

Again in 1834, Peniston became a scout in what was then known as the Hertherly War. It was at this time that the settlers built a block house near his father’s residence. In the spring of 1836 he built a flat boat on the Grand River near the town of Millport and loaded it with venison hams, deer skins, coon skins, wild turkey, honey and beeswax. He ran safely out of Grand River and down the Missouri River to St. Louis where he disposed of his cargo and then returned home. Thus, Theodore Peniston was the first to utilize the waters of Grand River as a highway for commerce.

About this same time, Peniston studied law and was admitted to the bar. He located in Gallatin, MO, for several years and followed this profession. He later returned to farming.

Theodore Peniston was born in Jessamine County, KY, on May 6, 1812. He married Susan F. Williams in February, 1848. He died in Jackson Township, Daviess County, MO, on Nov. 9, 1892, at age 80. He was buried on his farm in the old family cemetery on the Ridge near where he first located in the county.

Peniston came from a family which was among the very first to populate Daviess County, MO. His father, Robert P. Peniston, settled on Splawn Ridge before Daviess County was organized. At the time of Robert’s death in 1831, Theodore was the only member of his father’s family residing in the county and was the oldest living resident in the county, having resided here for 61 years.

Taken from a reprint of an obituary printed as a “40 Years Ago” memory printed in the Gallatin North Missourian, 1932.