Gallatin’s YMCA Building

The meeting to organize the YMCA in Gallatin was held in the Methodist Church on Jan. 16, 1887. In 1908, the urgent need of a permanent building was voiced. Through the donation of a lot by C.L. Knaur and money raised by popular subscriptions, a building was erected one block east of the business square at a cost of about $8,000.

The meeting to organize the YMCA in Gallatin was held in the Methodist Church on Jan. 16, 1887. In 1908, the urgent need of a permanent building was voiced. Through the donation of a lot by C.L. Knaur and money raised by popular subscriptions, a building was erected one block east of the business square at a cost of about $8,000.

The stone-faced block building was completed in January, 1909 (the Masons were in charge of a cornerstone ceremony on Oct. 5, 1908). The building contained a combination gymnasium-auditorium, kitchen and dining room, a main room and a second floor library. A tennis court was built at the rear of the building.

The first full time secretary was Fred Vollmer. For many years Gallatin boasted the only YMCA with a full time, paid secretary in a town of 2,500 or less in the United States. When it was found that the town could no longer give the proper financial support to the yearly budget, the property was sold the city and the building was converted into the community’s city hall.

The legal description of this building is as follows: Block 3 West & 3 South, Original Town, E 1/2 of Lots 5 & 6.

— notes by Mrs. Earl Binney for a Historic Inventory prepared 10/26/67

Woodruff Ice Cream

In 1927, Woodruff’s Ice Cream reported a volume of business so great that they couldn’t meet the demand for their ice cream. That year they exceeded their expectations by retailing 20,000 gallons of ice cream. To accommodate their increasing business, the ice cream plant was moved to a new location on North Main Street. The location was known as the McClasky Building which previously housed a Chevrolet dealership.

In 1927, Woodruff’s Ice Cream reported a volume of business so great that they couldn’t meet the demand for their ice cream. That year they exceeded their expectations by retailing 20,000 gallons of ice cream. To accommodate their increasing business, the ice cream plant was moved to a new location on North Main Street. The location was known as the McClasky Building which previously housed a Chevrolet dealership.

Small rooms ran down both sides of the former garage about half the length of the building. Some were used for company offices. The remainder were used for living quarters. The machinery was located at the back of the building.

On May 3, 1928, the Gallatin North Missourian quoted Mr. Woodruff as saying, “We started out with four walls and now have a place that is the last word of factories of this kind.”

The first “freeze” in the new location was approximately 600 gallons of ice cream. One of the main features of the plant was the storage or refrigerator room which had a capacity for holding several thousand gallons of ice cream. They expected to make 500 or 600 gallons of ice cream per day during the rush part of the season and had the potential to make 800 gallons a day.

During the peak season the company would employ five or six men.

The business was among the first ice cream manufacturers to package in sealright round pint and quart containers. A mix was made six days a week and each was frozen the next day. Ice cream was made into retail size containers, five gallon cans used for cone dipping, and ice cream bars.

To make bars, trays were filled and sticks inserted through a rack. The next day, the bars were cut, chocolate coated, individually sacked, and packed a dozen to a bag.

The business closed in 1975.

1864 County Farm

The first move to secure a permanent home for the care of the destitute of the county was made in 1864. Prior to that time the care of the poor had been let out by the sheriff to the lowest bidder. Occasionally the court would assume the responsibility and fix the terms for their support. The terms ranged from $25 to $100 a year and paid quarterly.

The first move to secure a permanent home for the care of the destitute of the county was made in 1864. Prior to that time the care of the poor had been let out by the sheriff to the lowest bidder. Occasionally the court would assume the responsibility and fix the terms for their support. The terms ranged from $25 to $100 a year and paid quarterly.

At the December term of the county court in 1864, two men were appointed commissioners to select the site for an alms house. The commissioners reported the farm that would best fit their need was the 160 acre farm which they purchased for $15 per acre, or $2,400. The terms were: one half in cash, $800 within two months, $400 within six months, with 10% interest upon deferred payments. A tax of one-sixth of one percent on all subjects of taxation was ordered to defray the expense of purchasing the farm and erecting the necessary buildings.

The farm proved to be of little use to the county. No buildings were erected and after a few years, it was sold and another site chosen for the county farm. The new tract consisted of 100 acres and was purchased for $2,000.

Upon examination of the farm in 1914, it was found many miserable conditions existed. This report created a demand for change. A petition was circulated asking for a special election to vote on the proposal of erecting a modern infirmary. The petition was signed by 700 taxpayers. The new proposal stated the old farm was to be sold and a new farm be purchased closer to the county seat. The proposition was rejected by the voters.
Once again, more improvements were made on the farm. Still the conditions were not ideal but in fair condition. Upon opening the new home, not all the poor were cared for at the farm. A number were allowed a certain amount each month, while other needy persons were given occasional help.

The county also had the expense of a number of patients in various state hospitals. At the end of 1920, the county had supported 42 people in the hospitals at a cost of nearly $1,000. Fourty-seven patients not in state hospitals were supported at a cost of nearly $5,000*.

People didn’t live long in the early part of the 20th century; in fact, a 50 year old man was considered old. Due to the lack of modern medicines and medical technology, many people died from diseases such as measles, whooping cough, and the flu. In the case of a death, if there wasn’t any family to take care of the deceased, burial was furnished by the county.

For the most part, at a person’s death, the funeral home was notified and a horse drawn hearse delivered the casket, usually black, which was usually made from pine wood and then lined. At other times, the men and the friends of the family built the burial box, padded it with cotton and added a spare pillow. Neither were vaults used nor the bodies embalmed.

Since many of the roads were mud roads, the body would often have to be carried to the hearse. After the body was prepared it was taken to the church where the funeral would be held. Neighbors sat up with the corpse.

Neighbors sang the songs and the minister, who sometimes rode in a circuit, delivered the message. Neighbors dug the graves. When the ground was frozen, they used dynamite to break it. They were skilled in using explosives because they had to use them to clear stumps out of the fields.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, from the *History of Daviess and Gentry Counties

The Critical Ice Storms of 1937

The winter of 1937 was a year of much ice. Prolonged ice coverage on the land was the most stressful time on livestock in years.

The winter of 1937 was a year of much ice. Prolonged ice coverage on the land was the most stressful time on livestock in years.

On the night of Jan. 6, a round sleet fell, followed by a layer of freezing rain. This layer of ice laid on the ground approximately five weeks. Each time a new sleet would fall things got worse. It soon accumulated to the point it was so thick it was hard on both the livestock and the people.
Farmers also had to find creative ways to get their horses to water. Some farmers took manure out of the barn and used it to make a path; others put gunny sacks on the horses’ feet, and chopped a path in the ice.

Many times the animals would start to slip on the ice and wouldn’t be able to stop until they fell. It’s hard to estimate the number of cattle, horses, and mules that had slipped on the ice and were found dead with broken legs, or so badly injured they had to be killed. A farmer near Gilman City lost 14 head of cattle. Nine of the cows smothered to death under a haystack while five fell on the ice and froze to death.

The only way a person could walk on the ice was to wear something on their shoes. One man made cleats out of mowing machine sickle blades for peoples’ shoes. A schoolboy used a pair of skates to skate to school for two of the winter months.

— researched by Wilbur Bush

Goodbye City Hall

During the Great Depression era, Gallatin citizens had a loss unrelated to the financial crisis that plagued the nation. In 1926, a fire destroyed the city hall which at that time was merely a wooden structure built in the 1870’s by the former city marshal, Joe Wickam. It was often referred to as the house that Joe built.

During the Great Depression era, Gallatin citizens had a loss unrelated to the financial crisis that plagued the nation. In 1926, a fire destroyed the city hall which at that time was merely a wooden structure built in the 1870’s by the former city marshal, Joe Wickam. It was often referred to as the house that Joe built.

Previously, the building served as a jail. However, two years before the fire, the iron cells were removed and the building moved closer to the street and rented as a place of business by the city. It had also been utilized for a second-hand store in the lower part as well as a residence for the store’s tenant in the upper part.

When the blaze occurred, the tenant lowered himself to the ground by using rope he’d previously placed nearby to use in case of a fire. To warn the people, the night officer fired his revolver and sounded a bell. Due to the wind, there was concern about danger to both the blacksmith shop on the south and the Farmer’s Produce Co. on the north, but they escaped without any harm. However, the city hall couldn’t be spared.

The shop’s merchandise and the city property were both insured. Now, plans were “in the air” as to what to do about a city hall. City officials suggested erecting a building on the fire site to serve as a city hall as well as centralize the various city departments.

Three years after the fire, specifications were made to build 40′ x 60′ brick building to be located at their present site. The city had the brick from an abandoned water tower, and only facing brick would need to be purchased. The city had been leasing a building since the fire and rent money saved could be applied to the construction cost. Also, there would be ample space to store fire equipment and to serve as a police court.

At this time it was suggested to use the old YMCA building that stood with boarded up doors and windows. The heads of the YMCA were notified and they soon met with the city officials at the Morris Hotel. It was decided the building would be given to the city hall free of charge. The playground would be kept for the town’s children to use. Thus, the problem of what to do for a city hall was solved.

— researched by Wilbur Bush

First School: Clear Creek School

A total of 400 students in the Clear Creek School was recorded since the time accurate records were kept. The Clear Creek School District, organized in 1840, was the oldest school district in Daviess County, Missouri.

A total of 400 students in the Clear Creek School was recorded since the time accurate records were kept. The Clear Creek School District, organized in 1840, was the oldest school district in Daviess County, Missouri.

The first school building erected was built one-half mile west of the school in operation in 1840. At their 1940 centennial, the speaker noted the fact that when the school was built there weren’t any modern conveniences, such as electricity and cars. Times had improved and advanced. The school also had to improve and change or the doors would be boarded up.

The first Clear Creek school was across the road from the Clear Creek Christian Church on Hwy. 190. It had a door on the south and one on the east. One door was used by the girls and the other by the boys. A walnut puncheon desk, fastened to the wall with pins, extended the entire length of the east wall. Puncheon seats were placed on opposite sides with boys sitting on one side and girls on the other.

A second school was built one-half mile of the first site. It was constructed in frontier fashion of hewn logs and was 18 feet square. In one end of the room there was a fireplace of rock chinked with clay, and in the opposite end there was a small window. This, along with one more window, furnished all the light for the building. A desk made of walnut puncheon fastened on pins driven in the wall was all the equipment with which the room was furnished.

The following year at a regular school board meeting, the board voted to furnish the pupils with seats. The seats were made of split logs into which pins were driven for legs. This type of seat was used until 1911 when more modern seats were purchased by the school board.

In 1857, a levy of $38 was raised for the addition of a floor, a ceiling, weatherboarding for the outside of the structure, and for fencing the grounds with posts and rails.

Each fall prior to the opening of school, the parents and patrons gathered at the school building for a day of “chinking” at which time the foundation was covered again with clay and the cracks between the logs and weatherboarding were daubed with fresh mud.

One time the citizens neglected this duty and the teacher asked each student to help with the chinking of the building with mud. The students removed the backs of their seats and used the boards to punch the mud into the cracks. The building was thoroughly daubed from the ceiling to the floor by 4 p.m.

In later years, the school was destroyed by fire during the Civil War when two men were killed, one hiding in the school and one in the church.

— researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

A. Knauer & Son Clothing Store

The Knauer store started in Gallatin in 1866 when Andrew Knauer established a merchant-tailor business. The business thrived. Whenever a person saw the Knauer label on a piece of clothing, they knew it had a quality that would last. The Knauer name was familiar to nearly every household in Daviess County.

The Knauer store started in Gallatin in 1866 when Andrew Knauer established a merchant-tailor business. The business thrived. Whenever a person saw the Knauer label on a piece of clothing, they knew it had a quality that would last. The Knauer name was familiar to nearly every household in Daviess County.

The store started on the east side of the Gallatin square and relocated several times. In 1916 it was written that Andrew Knauer “engaged in the merchant tailoring shop in the old building where the I.O.O.F. Building now stands,” and one year later moved to the building which “stood at that time just south of the First National Bank. Two years later, he bought the old frame building that stood where the Murry Drug Co., building now stands.” And, in 1887, a 2-story building was erected.

The first Knauer store was very simple with only a floor space of 22×90 feet. Not much is said about the tailor business itself, except that Knauer products were of suburb quality.

The store had many sales at various times, but had a very special 9-day sale commencing on May 25, 1916, for the business’s 50th anniversary. A $15 reward was offered to the customer who registered after coming from the greatest distance and buying a suit for $15 or more. Knauer gave this winner a choice of a $15 clothcraft suit or $15 in gold. They also refunded all customers 10% off the amount of purchase of 50 cents or more.

In 1917 a shoe department was added. Shoes were displayed in a plate glass show window.

In 1920 Knauer announced in an advertisement that the business of 54 years would be closed so that he could take up other interests. He offered 20% to 30% off until all the clothing and furnishings were either sold or the business was purchased by another.

Newspaper accounts then go void concerning the Knauer store until 1927. The store was robbed for the third time in a 3-year period. During this robbery thieves entered through a basement window and started rummaging through and grabbing items off shelves. Two suitcases were opened and left setting on the counter …perhaps evidence of a quick departure. Both men’s and women’s clothing had been taken, at an estimated value of $250. There was no insurance to cover this loss. It was speculated that the crime was done by someone familiar with the store and area.

Another sale event attracted hundreds of people from miles around Gallatin in 1928. People who hadn’t visited the community in years joined Gallatin residents in attending the event. Prices were so low — 30, 40 or 50 cents on the dollar — that people made purchases even on unneeded items, to store them until they were needed. The big sale was conducted so that merchandise would be gone when interior improvements to the building were to be done.

Little else can be gleaned from local newspapers about A. Knauer & Son

— written by Wlibur Bush

The “Honey War” with Iowa

Border war clashes were not always between Missouri and Kansas. A dispute over the state boundary between Missouri and Iowa once almost caused a honey of a war. Only a matter of timing kept state militias from both states from expanding a legal dispute into perhaps something more.

Border war clashes were not always between Missouri and Kansas. A dispute over the state boundary between Missouri and Iowa once almost caused a honey of a war. Only a matter of timing kept state militias from both states from expanding a legal dispute into perhaps something more.

In the laste 1830s, Missouri claimed a strip of land nearly 13 miles into what many settlers considered Iowa territory. When Missouri tax collectors cut down valuable bee trees as payment for taxes settlers refused to pay, more than 1,200 Iowans lined up along the disputed border with pitchforks for revenge.

History marks what is known today as the Honey War of 1839 as Missouri’s most significant boundary dispute. There were no casualties, and bee trees might not seem worth fighting over by today’s standards. But our ancestors relied on honey because sugar was so scarce. Taking a supply of honey was almost a bad as stealing a horse.

Surveyor J.C. Sullivan had established the boundary to divide Missouri territory from Osage Indan lands decades before the dispute in 1816. He used posts to devine what was known as the “Sullivan Line.” By the mid-1830s, however, many of these posts were no longer visible. Some sunk into the silt of the Des Moines river bed.

The Missouri legislature ordered government workers to resurvey the line. This eventually resulted in three border maps. Two of these were drawn relatively close to the old Sullivan line, but a third jutted northward — definitely into present-day Iowa. In 1838 J.C. Brown, who established the boundary, convinced the Missouri legislature that this northward line was the proper boundary. Missouri legislators were probably looking more at the potential tax base rather than at legalities.

Brown thought the Des Moines Rapids that Sullivan documented in his survey lines were rapids located in the Des Moines River. But these rapids were actually in the Mississippi River. There was some logic to the confusion. Setters had dubbed a stretch of the Mississippi as “Des Moines rapids” since the river dropped 23 feet over an 22-mile span. Brown merely assumed that the rapids named “Des Moines” must have been located in the Des Moines River.

Iowans objected to Missouri’s decision. When Iowans refused to pay taxes, Missouri sent agents into what later became Van Buren (Iowa) County and cut down bee trees as partial payment. They also threatened Iowans, warning that the Missouri governor had alerted the state militia to force settlers to pay. That prompted the Iowans to alert Iowa Governor Robert Lucas.

History records what didn’t occur. When Missouri mustered 600 militia men, their trip to Iowa was fruitless. There was not yet an Iowa militia organized to fight. Eventually when about 1,200 Iowans lined up with pitchforks, the Missouri militia had already gone home.

A war of rhetoric ensued between Missouri Gov. Lilbun Boggs and Iowa Gov. Lucas, who considered any military threat from Missouri as a declaration of war against the United States. When U.S. Marshals were contacted, both sides were urged to stand down until the U.S. Supreme Court could peaceably resolve the dispute.

Citizenry was notably less serious about the circumstances than their leaders, probably because of the whiskey consumed wherever groups of rivals met. One report said the Missourians came armed with six wagon loads of provisions, five of them full of booze. Intching to shoot something, they divided a haunch of venison, labeled one half Boggs and the other Lucas and shot them full of holes. Then they buried each with mock ceremony.

In 1849 the U.S. Supreme Court decided that the old Sullivan line was the true bondary between Missouri and Iowa. The Iowa History Project recounts that surveyors searched for several days before chipping into a decayed tree trunk to find the branded tree Sullivan established as the northeastern corner of Missouri.

Surveyors then drove iron pillars at 10-mie intervals along the line that headed west to the Des Moines River. A handful of pillars that have survived the past still dot the landscape as testiment to a peaceful resolution.

— taken in part from the Missouri Ruralist, March 2008, in an article written by Katherine Heine

Jameson History Narrated by Early Resident

The following was written by my uncle, Robert Clinton Brown, circa 1940

The following was written by my uncle, Robert Clinton Brown, circa 1940, based on merchants I knew were not in business earlier and his statement, “At the moment Jameson does not have a Café” which I knew was true about that time. This is from his original typewritten copy, incorporating his handwritten additions, corrections, and rearrangements.

— V.L. Scott (note attached to original 8-5-99)

I, Robert C. (Bob) Brown was born and reared in the Jameson community and came into town to work the latter part of February. This was in the 1911 horse and buggy days. There were no highways then and at times the roads were almost impassable, particularly after a big snow had melted or after a big rain.

I drove a week for Dr. J.B. Graham. His means of transportation at this time was with a team and buggy. Quite a few of his patients lived in the country.

The following week, March 3, 1911, I began work in the general store of A.D. Scott and Sons.

At this particular time there were two general stores, two hardware stores, and one drug store in which there was a jewelry store. Jameson’s only hotel, the Hubbard House, was operated by Mrs. Mary Walls and members of her family. The Bank of Jameson was the town’s only bank at this time. There were two produce houses one of which sold coal and feeds of all kinds, two restaurants (sic), two blacksmith shops, two barber shops, four lodges, three churches, one school with two year high school, one lumber yard, two doctor’s offices, one opera house, one furniture and undertaking store, which also carried a line of groceries, two livery barns, and one dray line. The post office was housed in the J.H. Gillespie hardware and Mr. Gillespie was the postmaster.

Jameson through the years has really been hit by fires, particularly in the business district.

The land on which Jameson is located was originally owned by Wm. E. Barber and Chas. A. Cravens who entered the land from the U.S. Government on Nov. 18, 1850, and March 23, 1854. Henry Briggs obtained title to the land Jan. 24, 1868. The town site was laid off, platted and designated as the Town of Jameson Oct. 2, 1871, and was incorporated Oct. 12, 1876. The first town board was composed of the following citizens: W.T. Stovall, A.O. Siple, J.M. Raley, S.F. Nowell, and A. Ingraham.

During the month on June 1871, the St. Louis, Chillicothe and Omaha railroad, later known as the Wabash, had completed a new railroad as far west as the town site and in Oct. 1871, a post office was opened and John A Brown was the first postmaster.

Henry Briggs, who donated the city park consisting of one block of land, also built the first residence in the new town in 1868, soon after he obtained title to the land.

Herbert D. White built the first business building for a grocery store.

The first hotel was built by E. H. Hubbard and called “The Hubbard House.”

The first house of worship in the new town was a Methodist Church erected in 1874. The second was a Christian Church erected in 1875. The third was a Baptist Church erected in the early ‘80s.

The first newspaper published in the town was the Jameson Reporter in 1884 by M.F. Stipes; the second was the Jameson Laconic in 1890 by E.A. Martin; the third was the Jameson Advertiser in 1887 (sic) by the Graves Brothers; the fourth was the Jameson Weekly Journal in 1897 by Joe V. Nowder; the fifth was the Jameson Journal in 1898 by C.C. Bartruff; and the sixth and last was the Jameson Gem in 1913 by Allen F. Wade. Allen’s motto was “I know now what the truth may be, I tell the tale as ‘twas told to me.”

The first school established in Jameson was organized in the fall of 1872 and a one room frame school house was built during the winter of 1872-73. The site was a block west and a half block north of the present school building. The first school was a three month subscription school, with an enrollment of about a dozen pupils and was taught by Miss Martin in the summer of 1873, but due to a lack of support this first school was closed after about three weeks. The second school house was erected in Jameson in 1883, two blocks west of the northwest corner of the city park. It was a frame building of four rooms, with an enrollment of about 100 pupils.

During the year 1914 a consolidated school district was organized. It was adopted March 19th of that year, taking in the town of Jameson and portions of about six of the surrounding rural districts, an area of 37 square miles around the town.

Under the terms of the consolidation the first term of the new school district was held in the several districts. In April, 1915, the building was begun at the southeast corner of town and was completed within that year at a cost of $30,000. On Monday, Oct. 4, 1915, school opened in the new building with an enrollment of 300 students, with B.F. Brown as Superintendent. The new system had a complete grade and high school rating and was approved by the State Department in February, 1918.

Much credit for the new school should go to J.C. McDonald who worked tirelessly in the promotion of the proposition. Graduates of the Jameson school are holding positions of trust all over the United States. The trophy cases at the High School attest to the success of the Girls and Boys basketball teams in the local, district and state tournaments.

In the mercantile field Jameson had a number of general stores, grocery and variety stores. The merchants who owned or operated them are as follows: Martin G. Scott, Chas. W. Dunn, A.D. Scott, D. M. Lasley, Jno. W. Reed, M.A. Scott, C.L. Prayne, W.B. Magruder, Jim Stucker, F.W. Rhoades, J.E. Scott, J.R. Scott, R.C. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Briant, Ed Casteel, Harry Barton, A.H. Handy, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Caraway, and Mr. and Mrs. Dale Alexander.

Hardware stores haven’t changed hands as often as other lines of merchandise. The owners were: A.O. Siple, J.H. Gillespie, J.H. Sawyer, W.T. Feurt, S.C. Shaffer and J.R. Somerville.

Drug stores were owned by Matt Cavolt, Marion Barnes, Hugh Wells, Tom Magee and George and Henry French.

There have been a number of produce houses in the town, owners were W.T. Stoval, J.W. Jinkens, Cal Fasher, J.J. Jarrett and Jim (Butch) Reed.

Perhaps the man who contributed the most to the town was W.T. Stoval. He was on the first town board and a stockholder in the Bank of Jameson. He was a large land holder and out of his produce houses, he operated a number of huckster routes which picked up produce from all the surrounding towns. He brought Jameson and Coffey their first telephone lines. His illness was of short duration and he passed away July 21, 1908. The income from all of his holdings, according to the eulogy written at his death, was at times in excess of $40,000 per month, nearly one half million dollars per year.

Lodges organized and instituted during the years have been Lodge No. 500 A.F.&A.M., I.O.O.F., the John Kennett Post of the G.A.R., Royal Neighbors, the Knights of Pythias, the Eastern Star, and the Woodmen of the World. The A.F.&A.M. and the Eastern Star are the only ones that have survived through the years. Around July 1892, the Knights of Pythias instituted an annual celebration to be known as the Jameson K.P. picnic. This event was celebrated for a number of years, but after the K.P.’s surrendered their charter the local merchants have taken over and carried on until the Lion’s Club was organized. They have made it a three day affair with the 9th(Aug.) as one of the days, if possible.

Jameson at one time had two banks, the Bank of Jameson and the Farmers Bank. Among the folks who worked in the bank were L.M. Brown, J.C. Stovall, J.R. Scott, J.O. Wallace, Millard Overstreet, J.E. Scott, R.E. Irvin, J.H. Gillespie and Bryce Adcock in the Bank of Jameson and in the Farmers Bank were J.E. Jenkins, Ruby Jenkins, Geo. Johnson, Boyd Feurt, Helen Feurt and Wilma Jinkens. Sometime during the depression in the 1920’s Jameson lost both their banks about a week apart.

At the moment Jameson does not have a café, but at one time there were two. Among the owners were W. O. Breeden, J.W. Reed, Orval Jinkens, Webster Smith, Boyd Walls, J.W. Harris and J.O. Huntington.

There were two hotels here at one time: John A. Brown owned the Cottage House, his son J.F. Brown remodeled it and made a residence which now houses the Superintendent of School, Mr. Agenstein and family. The other was the Hubbard House built by E.H. Hubbard and was destroyed by fire many years ago. The home of Guy McNealy occupies the old site.

Postmasters serving the Jameson community have been John A. Brown, A.O. Siple, J.H. Gillespie, Cappie Hubbard, Neve Jinkens, Henry French, Maude Reed, John Smith and Jess Ferguson. Rural carriers have been Bert Wilson, John Sloan, J.C. Merrifield, Tom Foster, Roy Troxel, Sam Pugh, John Smith and Jack Tingler. A great change has been made in the Postal Service. At one time Jameson had three rural routes, now they have only one and he goes to Jamesport and serves one route out of Jamesport. Jack Tingler who had a route out of Jameson, serves a route that takes in Winston and Altamont. He still lives in Jameson.

Jameson is without a barber shop but at one time there were two shops here. Operators were John Curtis, Tom Simmons, Walter Merrifield, Abe Merrifield, Ed. Davis and Geo. Flint. Tom Simmons was a fine musician and during his stay here he organized a band. We had some good musicians and also some good concerts.

There has been quite a change in the millinery business in the last few years. Women rarely wear a hat, but Jameson has had some wonderful milliners among who were Eliza Hubbard, Josie Kehler, Mrs. Chas. Walls and Mrs. F.W. Elmore. Between seasons these ladies would go to the City and spend some time in the wholesale houses acquainting themselves with the new styles and the new trimmings that were being used.

One of the things Jameson misses probably more than anything else is a resident doctor. Through the years they were used to having two or more doctors living in the town, among whom were Dr. Howell, Dr. Pipkin, Dr. Raley, Dr. Martin, Dr. Galbreath, Dr. Wetzel, Dr. J.B. Graham, Dr. T.E. Graham and Dr. Fuson. Now Jameson is serviced by doctors living in Gallatin, Pattonsburg, Winston and mostly from their offices.

At one time Jameson had three blacksmith shops whose owners and operators were John Copeland, Geo. Stucker, Frank Gillespie, John Marshman, John F. Wilden, and Frank Bland. Along with cars came garages and filling stations. They were owned and operated by R.O. Graham, Bob Drummond, Bob Duly, Leroy Miller, Ralph Hughs (?), Andy Moulin and James Moulin.

Six passenger trains a day, three each way, for traveling salesmen who would call on their customers between trains. The traveling men also contributed to the hotel and to the liveryman. There were two livery barns in Jameson at one time, owned by R.A. Wilson and Walter D. Jarrett. The railroad also contributed to the welfare of the dray lines as there were two local freight trains (one each way) and quite often they would set out building materials, coal, flour, etc., in carload lots to be transported to the various stores by the dray lines. The dray lines throughout the years were owned by Earn Walton, Byrd Grant, W.D. Jarrett, and Brown and Huntington.

The old frame depot was destroyed by fire and was replaced by a concrete one which was eventually torn down. Jameson has no depot now and only two passenger trains a day (one each way) and no local freights. Telegraph operators and agents through the years were Brack Magruder, L.W. Bashaw, W.H. Taylor, John Hankins, John Robison, Dave Zornes, and Ava Pugh.

Only five of the original buildings that housed the above businesses remain and only two of the three churches, the Baptist and Christian.

Jameson has always been blessed with plenty of good carpenters, painters and paper hangers, and plasterers. Among the carpenters were Silas Hammond, Bud Wyrick, George Johnson, Sam and G.R. Clark, Dan and Lon Smith, Jack Tingler, and John Smith. Cement workers, plasterers, Etc., were Eb. Smith, Dan and Lon Smith and Henry Hightree. Painters and paper hangers were John Rybolt, F.O. Reed, Claybe and Chas. Smith.

The following was written by my uncle, Robert Clinton Brown, circa 1940

The following was written by my uncle, Robert Clinton Brown, circa 1940, based on merchants I knew were not in business earlier and his statement, “At the moment Jameson does not have a Café” which I knew was true about that time. This is from his original typewritten copy, incorporating his handwritten additions, corrections, and rearrangements.

— V.L. Scott (note attached to original 8-5-99)

I, Robert C. (Bob) Brown was born and reared in the Jameson community and came into town to work the latter part of February. This was in the 1911 horse and buggy days. There were no highways then and at times the roads were almost impassable, particularly after a big snow had melted or after a big rain.

I drove a week for Dr. J.B. Graham. His means of transportation at this time was with a team and buggy. Quite a few of his patients lived in the country.

The following week, March 3, 1911, I began work in the general store of A.D. Scott and Sons.

At this particular time there were two general stores, two hardware stores, and one drug store in which there was a jewelry store. Jameson’s only hotel, the Hubbard House, was operated by Mrs. Mary Walls and members of her family. The Bank of Jameson was the town’s only bank at this time. There were two produce houses one of which sold coal and feeds of all kinds, two restaurants (sic), two blacksmith shops, two barber shops, four lodges, three churches, one school with two year high school, one lumber yard, two doctor’s offices, one opera house, one furniture and undertaking store, which also carried a line of groceries, two livery barns, and one dray line. The post office was housed in the J.H. Gillespie hardware and Mr. Gillespie was the postmaster.

Jameson through the years has really been hit by fires, particularly in the business district.

The land on which Jameson is located was originally owned by Wm. E. Barber and Chas. A. Cravens who entered the land from the U.S. Government on Nov. 18, 1850, and March 23, 1854. Henry Briggs obtained title to the land Jan. 24, 1868. The town site was laid off, platted and designated as the Town of Jameson Oct. 2, 1871, and was incorporated Oct. 12, 1876. The first town board was composed of the following citizens: W.T. Stovall, A.O. Siple, J.M. Raley, S.F. Nowell, and A. Ingraham.

During the month on June 1871, the St. Louis, Chillicothe and Omaha railroad, later known as the Wabash, had completed a new railroad as far west as the town site and in Oct. 1871, a post office was opened and John A Brown was the first postmaster.

Henry Briggs, who donated the city park consisting of one block of land, also built the first residence in the new town in 1868, soon after he obtained title to the land.

Herbert D. White built the first business building for a grocery store.

The first hotel was built by E. H. Hubbard and called “The Hubbard House.”

The first house of worship in the new town was a Methodist Church erected in 1874. The second was a Christian Church erected in 1875. The third was a Baptist Church erected in the early ‘80s.

The first newspaper published in the town was the Jameson Reporter in 1884 by M.F. Stipes; the second was the Jameson Laconic in 1890 by E.A. Martin; the third was the Jameson Advertiser in 1887 (sic) by the Graves Brothers; the fourth was the Jameson Weekly Journal in 1897 by Joe V. Nowder; the fifth was the Jameson Journal in 1898 by C.C. Bartruff; and the sixth and last was the Jameson Gem in 1913 by Allen F. Wade. Allen’s motto was “I know now what the truth may be, I tell the tale as ‘twas told to me.”

The first school established in Jameson was organized in the fall of 1872 and a one room frame school house was built during the winter of 1872-73. The site was a block west and a half block north of the present school building. The first school was a three month subscription school, with an enrollment of about a dozen pupils and was taught by Miss Martin in the summer of 1873, but due to a lack of support this first school was closed after about three weeks. The second school house was erected in Jameson in 1883, two blocks west of the northwest corner of the city park. It was a frame building of four rooms, with an enrollment of about 100 pupils.

During the year 1914 a consolidated school district was organized. It was adopted March 19th of that year, taking in the town of Jameson and portions of about six of the surrounding rural districts, an area of 37 square miles around the town.

Under the terms of the consolidation the first term of the new school district was held in the several districts. In April, 1915, the building was begun at the southeast corner of town and was completed within that year at a cost of $30,000. On Monday, Oct. 4, 1915, school opened in the new building with an enrollment of 300 students, with B.F. Brown as Superintendent. The new system had a complete grade and high school rating and was approved by the State Department in February, 1918.

Much credit for the new school should go to J.C. McDonald who worked tirelessly in the promotion of the proposition. Graduates of the Jameson school are holding positions of trust all over the United States. The trophy cases at the High School attest to the success of the Girls and Boys basketball teams in the local, district and state tournaments.

In the mercantile field Jameson had a number of general stores, grocery and variety stores. The merchants who owned or operated them are as follows: Martin G. Scott, Chas. W. Dunn, A.D. Scott, D. M. Lasley, Jno. W. Reed, M.A. Scott, C.L. Prayne, W.B. Magruder, Jim Stucker, F.W. Rhoades, J.E. Scott, J.R. Scott, R.C. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Briant, Ed Casteel, Harry Barton, A.H. Handy, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Caraway, and Mr. and Mrs. Dale Alexander.

Hardware stores haven’t changed hands as often as other lines of merchandise. The owners were: A.O. Siple, J.H. Gillespie, J.H. Sawyer, W.T. Feurt, S.C. Shaffer and J.R. Somerville.

Drug stores were owned by Matt Cavolt, Marion Barnes, Hugh Wells, Tom Magee and George and Henry French.

There have been a number of produce houses in the town, owners were W.T. Stoval, J.W. Jinkens, Cal Fasher, J.J. Jarrett and Jim (Butch) Reed.

Perhaps the man who contributed the most to the town was W.T. Stoval. He was on the first town board and a stockholder in the Bank of Jameson. He was a large land holder and out of his produce houses, he operated a number of huckster routes which picked up produce from all the surrounding towns. He brought Jameson and Coffey their first telephone lines. His illness was of short duration and he passed away July 21, 1908. The income from all of his holdings, according to the eulogy written at his death, was at times in excess of $40,000 per month, nearly one half million dollars per year.

Lodges organized and instituted during the years have been Lodge No. 500 A.F.&A.M., I.O.O.F., the John Kennett Post of the G.A.R., Royal Neighbors, the Knights of Pythias, the Eastern Star, and the Woodmen of the World. The A.F.&A.M. and the Eastern Star are the only ones that have survived through the years. Around July 1892, the Knights of Pythias instituted an annual celebration to be known as the Jameson K.P. picnic. This event was celebrated for a number of years, but after the K.P.’s surrendered their charter the local merchants have taken over and carried on until the Lion’s Club was organized. They have made it a three day affair with the 9th(Aug.) as one of the days, if possible.

Jameson at one time had two banks, the Bank of Jameson and the Farmers Bank. Among the folks who worked in the bank were L.M. Brown, J.C. Stovall, J.R. Scott, J.O. Wallace, Millard Overstreet, J.E. Scott, R.E. Irvin, J.H. Gillespie and Bryce Adcock in the Bank of Jameson and in the Farmers Bank were J.E. Jenkins, Ruby Jenkins, Geo. Johnson, Boyd Feurt, Helen Feurt and Wilma Jinkens. Sometime during the depression in the 1920’s Jameson lost both their banks about a week apart.

At the moment Jameson does not have a café, but at one time there were two. Among the owners were W. O. Breeden, J.W. Reed, Orval Jinkens, Webster Smith, Boyd Walls, J.W. Harris and J.O. Huntington.

There were two hotels here at one time: John A. Brown owned the Cottage House, his son J.F. Brown remodeled it and made a residence which now houses the Superintendent of School, Mr. Agenstein and family. The other was the Hubbard House built by E.H. Hubbard and was destroyed by fire many years ago. The home of Guy McNealy occupies the old site.

Postmasters serving the Jameson community have been John A. Brown, A.O. Siple, J.H. Gillespie, Cappie Hubbard, Neve Jinkens, Henry French, Maude Reed, John Smith and Jess Ferguson. Rural carriers have been Bert Wilson, John Sloan, J.C. Merrifield, Tom Foster, Roy Troxel, Sam Pugh, John Smith and Jack Tingler. A great change has been made in the Postal Service. At one time Jameson had three rural routes, now they have only one and he goes to Jamesport and serves one route out of Jamesport. Jack Tingler who had a route out of Jameson, serves a route that takes in Winston and Altamont. He still lives in Jameson.

Jameson is without a barber shop but at one time there were two shops here. Operators were John Curtis, Tom Simmons, Walter Merrifield, Abe Merrifield, Ed. Davis and Geo. Flint. Tom Simmons was a fine musician and during his stay here he organized a band. We had some good musicians and also some good concerts.

There has been quite a change in the millinery business in the last few years. Women rarely wear a hat, but Jameson has had some wonderful milliners among who were Eliza Hubbard, Josie Kehler, Mrs. Chas. Walls and Mrs. F.W. Elmore. Between seasons these ladies would go to the City and spend some time in the wholesale houses acquainting themselves with the new styles and the new trimmings that were being used.

One of the things Jameson misses probably more than anything else is a resident doctor. Through the years they were used to having two or more doctors living in the town, among whom were Dr. Howell, Dr. Pipkin, Dr. Raley, Dr. Martin, Dr. Galbreath, Dr. Wetzel, Dr. J.B. Graham, Dr. T.E. Graham and Dr. Fuson. Now Jameson is serviced by doctors living in Gallatin, Pattonsburg, Winston and mostly from their offices.

At one time Jameson had three blacksmith shops whose owners and operators were John Copeland, Geo. Stucker, Frank Gillespie, John Marshman, John F. Wilden, and Frank Bland. Along with cars came garages and filling stations. They were owned and operated by R.O. Graham, Bob Drummond, Bob Duly, Leroy Miller, Ralph Hughs (?), Andy Moulin and James Moulin.

Six passenger trains a day, three each way, for traveling salesmen who would call on their customers between trains. The traveling men also contributed to the hotel and to the liveryman. There were two livery barns in Jameson at one time, owned by R.A. Wilson and Walter D. Jarrett. The railroad also contributed to the welfare of the dray lines as there were two local freight trains (one each way) and quite often they would set out building materials, coal, flour, etc., in carload lots to be transported to the various stores by the dray lines. The dray lines throughout the years were owned by Earn Walton, Byrd Grant, W.D. Jarrett, and Brown and Huntington.

The old frame depot was destroyed by fire and was replaced by a concrete one which was eventually torn down. Jameson has no depot now and only two passenger trains a day (one each way) and no local freights. Telegraph operators and agents through the years were Brack Magruder, L.W. Bashaw, W.H. Taylor, John Hankins, John Robison, Dave Zornes, and Ava Pugh.

Only five of the original buildings that housed the above businesses remain and only two of the three churches, the Baptist and Christian.

Jameson has always been blessed with plenty of good carpenters, painters and paper hangers, and plasterers. Among the carpenters were Silas Hammond, Bud Wyrick, George Johnson, Sam and G.R. Clark, Dan and Lon Smith, Jack Tingler, and John Smith. Cement workers, plasterers, Etc., were Eb. Smith, Dan and Lon Smith and Henry Hightree. Painters and paper hangers were John Rybolt, F.O. Reed, Claybe and Chas. Smith.

–reprinted from the Gallatin North Missourian, August, 1999

Cline and Cline Flour Mill

In the early 1900’s, the Cline & Cline Aetna Roller Mill was located in Gallatin. It was well known due to the good management of W.G. and Peter Cline.

In the early 1900’s, the Cline & Cline Aetna Roller Mill was located in Gallatin. It was well known due to the good management of W.G. and Peter Cline.

The mill was built in 1881 and had a capacity of 80 barrels of flour and 200 barrels of meal per miller’s day. It was located four blocks southwest of the public square and embraced a 157×209 foot plot of land. The frame building was 40×40 foot and was four stories high. It had the best and the newest equipment on the market. Aside the main structure was a receiving and flour room with adjoining elevators.

The trademarks of the mill were “Sunbeam” (soft) and Old Dutch (hard). Unfortunately, on July, 1903, a fire was started by a hot box around midnight just a few minutes after the workers left after a long shift to get 300 sacks of flour for Princeton.

At this time the mill proper had two car loads of flour and feed ready for shipment and about 100 bushel of wheat. It was estimated the loss was about $2,500 with only $8,500 insurance being $6,500 on the building and about $2,000 in its stock which included 2,000 bushel of wheat and corn. Fortunately, the firm’s books and accounts were saved because they were located in an old fashion iron safe.

The mill fire was the first fire of any size that Gallatin had experienced in over a year. The fire fighting was hindered due to the aging of the equipment. The fire hose was rotten with age and had been slightly unused causing it to break constantly.

The mill was moved to a temporary location at the Farmers Exchange Bank and had their books and accounts there. Plans were to build a new structure at least double the capacity of the mill destroyed. Arrangements were made for a mill at Cameron to supply their trade until they could replace the Gallatin mill.

In 1916, the Atena mill again caught on fire. The new structure had three floors and a sheet iron covering on the outside. The engine room and the sheds were saved, but the main three stories and the basement section were totally destroyed. The cause of the fire was unknown, but it was believed it started near the corn sheller. The monetary loss was about $14,000 and there was $9,000 worth of insurance. The quantity of some of the goods lost included flour, feed stuff, and about 2,500 bushel of wheat.

The mill lay vacant a few years and the children were found skating on the old mill pond in the winter months. The lot was later given to the Lion’s Club for a park.

Written by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin

Lambert Mfg. — Gallatin’s First Major Factory

In 1953, the prospect of having a cap factory in Gallatin, MO, had become realistic. Jim and Joe Lambert, who had established their business in Chillicothe in 1936. Another Missouri manufacturing company indicated that if the Lamberts would furnish a building with a sufficient work force to meet their need, they would start a factory in Gallatin.

In 1953, the prospect of having a cap factory in Gallatin, MO, had become realistic. Jim and Joe Lambert, who had established their business in Chillicothe in 1936. Another Missouri manufacturing company indicated that if the Lamberts would furnish a building with a sufficient work force to meet their need, they would start a factory in Gallatin.

The product was to be a complete line of men’s and boys’ caps, including work, sport and utility types. Two other towns had already offered to supply the company with a building. In order to determine if Gallatin would also be considered, the company had to know about the available work force.

The manufacturer was ready to move! Competing communities were given a short time frame. People wanting work were give 30 days to register. The number responding in the Gallatin community was 174 men and women — nearly twice the registration anticipated. Some of these applicants were from other towns; some were employed at other jobs. All apparently thought the proposal for a Gallatin factory was more appealing.

Gallatin was chosen for the factory site, but this required citizens to raise approximately $40,000 to build a building with at least 10,000 square feet of floor space. The firm offered to guarantee a payroll for its first 12 months of operation on the condition that the new proprietors could lease the building for $1 a year. Factories being constructed elsewhere in other small towns often demanded and received free rent in return for payroll benefits.

A special fundraising committee was appointed to get financial commitments from businesses and interested individuals. The majority of the people believed the funds could be raised. Many made sacrifices to the extent they borrowed money to donate to the cause. Still, others felt the company was going more than halfway when it agreed to offer benefits for a 10-year period which included building maintenance, insurance and property taxes in addition to the guaranteed payroll.

At this time the Gallatin Industrial Development Corporation (GIDC) was established. Stockholders were 12 individuals each pledging $1,000. The corporation’s affairs were to be handled by a board of nine directors who would appoint a president, vice-president, and secretary-treasurer.

The corporation wanted to be capitalized at $50,000 through the sale of stock to local people. The value of the shares had been set low at $25 so that as many people as possible might participate. It was meant to be a community project. No matter how large or how small the amount, the people who invested in stocks would own a piece of the building.

The manufacturer encouraged the citizens by pointing out a primary payroll dollar turned over approximately seven times before leaving the community. This meant from an original investment of $40,000, the community would realize both directly and indirectly a return of over $5 million. A businessman who was familiar with the Lambert Company bet a new hat that the factory would need additional space within the next two or three years.

In 1953 Jim and Joe Lambert looked to expand their headwear business which had operated in Chillicothe, MO, since 1936. Seventeen building sites were considered. The site for the factory was land owned by H.L. Tate along Highway 13 in south Gallatin (near the A.K. Moore building at that time).

The factory was to start with 45 women employees. It was believed that the plant would eventually expand and employ from 100 to 150 persons with a weekly payroll in excess of $3,000. At first, the payroll would be about $1,300 weekly and would steadily increase as workers became more proficient.

The boiler for heating the building and supplying steam for blocking the caps was one of the largest single expenses at $3,000. However, a used boiler was found for about $1,000. It was large enough to provide for a second factory building if one should be added at a later date.

It was hoped that the factory would trigger additional business growth for Gallatin and stem the loss of young people locating elsewhere. Daviess County had been losing population for six decades; increasing farm sizes also contributed to population loss.

Seventeen building sites were considered. The site for the factory was land owned by H.L. Tate along Highway 13 (near the A.K. Moore building at that time). This site was close to water and sewer utilities. The building’s foundation could be prepared with little expense, and ample parking space was available. A consulting engineer determined the building type and design and also assisted in selecting a contractor.

Snyder Quarries donated the use of their bulldozers and Union Township furnished a grader. Several people donated a few days of labor on the building construction. Lamberts paid 25 to 30 people during the factory’s startup pluss the installation of machinery. Temporary business officers were set up in the display room of the A.K. Moore building.

A dedication ceremony featured a traditional ribbon cutting. The first cap made in the new building was presented by the Lamberts to Gallatin Mayor C. Binney, symbolic of the beginning of Gallatin’s first major industry.

Employees at Lambert Cap Factory in 1954 are: back row — Mabel Owens, Eleanor Duly, Florence Savage and Shirley Knott; 2nd row — Wilbur Roloson, Bob Chance (Mgr.), Opie Cox, Ford Savage, Amel Price, Mamie Tadlock (office), Edna Landes, ___, Della Prindle, Rose Gwinn, Avis Lee, ___, Beatrice Kromeich, Lavonne Teel; 3rd row — Ruby Kowns, Mary Hicks, Ruby Bassett, Anna Vasterling, Patsy Harris, Ann Reynolds, Martha Woods, Ann Uthe, Beulah Houghton, Dorothy Stith, Alma Wilson. The original factory was a cement and cement block building located at 609 South Main Street (Highway 13).

It was stated that the Lamberts would spend from $200 to $600 to train each new employee before realizing a profit from that employee’s labor. Applications were made to the wage and hour division for a learner’s certificate which enabled Lamberts to hire inexperienced help at less than 75 cents an hour minimum. The work force ratio was to be approximately one man for every 10 women.

The factory’s payroll grew to approximately $100,000 for 56 employees by the end of the first year. Thus, Lamberts doubled the guaranteed payroll of $50,000 promised when coming to town. Production tallies were from 750 to 1,000 dozen caps manufactured each week. Even with the large production, the company still had to buy caps from other manufacturers to meet demand; Lambert simply couldn’t make caps fast enough.

On its first anniversary in 1954, the employees were paid in silver dollars for a 3-week period to show the community the effect of the local payroll. Workers’ checks were cashed at the factory, and the silver dollars issued in return. Employees had been instructed to spend their silver dollars for their purchases rather than deposit them or to exchange the silver for paper currency. Merchants were urged to place the silver dollars back in circulation. This project gave a first hand demonstration of how local payroll dollars were spent seven times before leaving the community.

— taken from GIDC records

Rows of workers sewed caps together, sold throughout the nation. Workers were compensated on a “per piece” basis. (photo circa 1980s)

The Hidden ‘Treasure’ at Gallatin City Hall

Probably few people know the story of Gallatin’s city hall and what is hidden in the former Y.M.C.A. building’s cornerstone, bearing the name Y.M.C.A., the emblem of the Y.M.C.A., and the dates 1887 and 1908.

Probably few people know the story of Gallatin’s city hall and what is hidden in the former Y.M.C.A. building’s cornerstone, bearing the name Y.M.C.A., the emblem of the Y.M.C.A., and the dates 1887 and 1908.

On Oct. 5, 1908, the same day as the dedication of Gallatin’s new courthouse, the cornerstone was laid for the building. In spite of a two hour rain, both events went very smoothly. Another highlight of the day was having Judge William Taft, republican presidential candidate, give a speech. He was transported to and from the depot by automobile, which alone was very exciting for many people since it was the first, or one of the few times they had seen an automobile in operation. An estimated 20,000 to 25,000 people from miles around gathered in Gallatin, making it the largest crowd the town had seen since the lynching of Jump and Smith in 1886.

The seed for the new Y.M.C.A. building was sown shortly after the organization of the fellowship in 1887. There seemed to be very little interest in this organization and it was kept alive by a few faithful members, but hadn’t accomplished what it should have. The early efforts to create a fund for the maintenance and equipment of the organization resulted in an annual membership fee of $6 at first, but in 1890 this was reduced to $2, and later the fee was dropped altogether. Although the association’s membership wasn’t large, it was to reach a good many of all classes of men and boys, young and old, of the town in different periods.

In 1889, which was the second anniversary of the Gallatin Y.M.C.A., 40 delegations representing six associations met and the subject of erecting a building for the association was discussed. Not long after, a two story brick building was purchased from E.M. Mann for $1,600.

The upper floor was converted into the Y.M.C.A. Auditorium Reading room. Previously, the first floor of this building had been used for the Gallatin post office, and even with this new purchase, continued to be used, and the rental fee applied to payment of the association’s debt for the building. The incoming rental fee allowed the debt to be reduced until little was owed on it. In time, the post office was moved to a new location, and the association’s debt paid off. The mortgage was burned at a public meeting held in the Christian Church.

The usefulness of the association had been curtailed by the fact that it didn’t have room in the building for the equipment of a gymnasium and for the educational and practical work necessary to make it fulfill a real mission as Y.M.C.A. This inspired President C.L. Knauver to build up a county Y.M.C.A. work in Missouri, commencing in Gallatin. He offered the Gallatin Y.M.C.A. a lot across the street south from the Christian Church and also $600 in cash, if the organization would raise the funds necessary to erect and equip a modern Y.M.C.A. structure on it. The offer was accepted, the old building sold, and the balance of the money necessary, a total of about $7,000, was raised.

In 1908, after a lapse of time, the new building was nearing completion approximately three weeks ahead of its targeted completion date of Nov. 1. At this time, the organization of boys numbered 110, but there seemed to be little interest among the boys n the organization. It was hoped that this building would promote interest and a new goal of 200 would be reached.

At the cornerstone laying of the new Y.M.C.A. building (Gallatin’s present city hall), the ceremonies were conducted by the Masonic Order, Gov. A.M.. Dockery acting as grand master. Following the Masonic ceremonies, a short address was delivered by State Secretary Banks, in which he stated something of the plan or account of the Gallatin Y.M.C.A., since its organization and its plan to make a county organization here. He was followed by Rollin J. Britton, a man well versed in Daviess County history.

The cornerstone was laid by the Masonic society with Gov. A.M.. Dockery acting as the grand master. The cornerstone was pushed in a niche in the almost completed building. It displayed the Y.M.C.A. emblem, being a circle representing the unity of the world; inside the circle a triangle, with its three sides inscribed with the words, body, mind, spirit, typifying the three-fold nature of man; inside the triangle an open Bible bearing the reference John 17:21, and the whole having as a background the Greek letters for the word Christ. Several articles were placed in a box and placed in the cornerstone, among which were an Oxford Bible, a copy of the Oct. 1 issue of the Gallatin Democrat, the Oct. 2 issue of the North Missourian, the Daviess County Telephone Directory, pictures of the founders of the organization, a written story of the organization, etc., for the benefit of those who might tear the building down in later years. At this time it was predicted the building would be completed in approximately 30 days and the building dedication would take place around that time.

The new $6,000 building, free of debt, was made of three stories of cement blocks with a basement with an eight foot ceiling having four feet out of the ground; the next story, or main floor, had a ceiling 12 feet high, and the third story was 10 feet high. The heating plant, storage room for fuel, tub and shower baths and lockers for clothing were located in the basement. The main floor was to be completely furnished as a kitchen.

With the facilities, the stage, and the kitchen, a place was provided for all home talent entertainment, lectures, banquets, dinners and receptions. The remaining space in that part of the building contained a 29 x 42 foot area to be used as a gymnasium with complete equipment, for gymnastics and indoor games. The building was to be open every day and night during the week except Sunday when it was open only in the afternoons. There were to be religious meetings for the boys and the men addressed by local and foreign talent. In addition, there were to be classes for the study of English, Bible and missions, as well as practical subjects and music. Gymnastic classes were to be held three times during the day. The daily and denominational papers and the standard magazines were to be kept in the reading room and library.

The object of all the phases of the work was for the association to have the opportunity to serve the men and boys physically, mentally and spiritually and thus develop a full-rounded manhood. It was hoped the building would be the headquarters for all work and workers in the county.

Unfortunately, the work of the Y.M.C.A. came to a halt when Gallatin couldn’t support its activities, maybe due to the lack of tax money due to the Depression. We do know it closed in this era when many banks and businesses were closing their doors and going out of business. In 1929, the building became the new home of the city hall.

— written by Wilbur Bush, September, 2005, published in the Gallatin North Missourian 10-12-05

Remember Way Back When (in 1936)

In the Oct. 1, 1936, edition of the Gallatin Democrat, a former Gallatin man reminiscensed about days gone by which now offers a glimpse into hometown details long forgotten. Dr. Seiden Stout of Maumeo, Ohio, wrote the following after visiting Gallatin the previous month (September, 1936). The article recalls many of the historic places in Gallatin together with citizens of former years in an intensely engaging and unique way:

In the Oct. 1, 1936, edition of the Gallatin Democrat, a former Gallatin man reminiscensed about days gone by which now offers a glimpse into hometown details long forgotten. Dr. Seiden Stout of Maumeo, Ohio, wrote the following after visiting Gallatin the previous month (September, 1936). The article recalls many of the historic places in Gallatin together with citizens of former years in an intensely engaging and unique way:

Do you remember when John H. Townsend used to run the Gallatin Dry Goods and Grocery Co., over on the southeast corner of the square, and Billy Osborn was manager of the dry goods department, D.H. Gilchrist of the grocery, and C.A. Stout of clothing, boots and shoes, and Henry Brooks the porter?

Do you remember that J.H. Townsend had the first telephone in Gallatin. It was connected from the store to his home, and when he wanted to talk over the phone he rapped on the front of the little box office and this made a noise at the other end and notified them?

And do you recall that later on, when more phones came into use, an exchange was established at the cahsier’s desk at the Gallatin Dry Goods & Grocery Company, and then as it grew the exchagne was moved upstairs and was operated by Walter Townsend?

Do you remember the Arbelia Opera House which was upstairs in the Townsend block, and was named after Mrs. Townsend? Do you recall the troupes that came for a Saturday night stand with matinee in the afternoon, and generally they carried their own brass band and gave concerts on the corner of the square just before the show started both in the afternoon and evening? This writer remembers seeing such shows as Uncle Tom’s Cabin with the big blood hounds in the parade at 12 o’clock noon, Human Hearts, Uncle Josh, not to mention many home talent and school affairs that were given in the old opera house. And do you recall that the opera house, the stage and footlights were lighted with artifical gas?

Do you remember the old McClaskey bus barn just across the alley from the Townsend block, and do you recall the old busses which plied back and forth to the Rock Island and Wabash depots? And if you wanted to be taken to a certain train, your name was written on a blackboard in the office so the driver would not forget you? And do you recall that your baggage was carried on top of the bus and the driver controlled the opening and closing of the door by a strap that ran up to his seat, and to keep the door closed he sat on the strap? Do you recall the little coal lamp up in the front end to give light inside the door?

Do you remember the one and only cab that Gallatin possessed which was used for the chief mourners at a funeral or the bride and groom at a wedding? Do you recall when J.H. Townsend would have the top let down and take his entire family out for a Sunday afternoon drive? When not in use this cab was used for funerals and a span of fine black horses was driven to it. When used for a wedding, a span of white horses was driven. The writer remembers that when he was 4 years old he took a trip to Kentucky with his mother and when about to return his father wrote tht he would meet them at the station with the cab and four horses and a plug hat, and so he did. Do you remember that the train on the Wabash called the “Dude?”

Do you remember when the courthouse square was a public park with a bandstand in the center? Do you recall the ice cream socials given by the church ladies in the park and the Japanese lanterns strung among the trees to give light? Do you remember that the ice cream was homemade, frozen in a huge freezer and the greezer turned by a big wheel on the outside of it?

Do you remember the Gallatin street fairs that were held in the park and streets around the square, and on the north side of the park was a stage built for the free shows, and out in front of the stage were board seats erected for the public, first come, first served? And for the amusement of the people there were negro cake walkers, magicians, public speakers, etc.?

Do you remember the balloon ascensions and parachute leaps at these street fairs, and do you remember the time that the man who had been going up daily decided to put on an extra attraction and send up his wife and she was to cut loose her parachute when he (her husband) below fired off his revolver, but that there was quite a bit of uneasiness among the crowd when she did not cut loose after he had fired several shots? Finally, she did cut loose and came down in an apple tree in the yard of Lewis Kenne in east Gallatin, and she said she did not hear the revolver shots and so when she had reached what she thought was high enough she cut loose.

Grand River Church the First Organized for Baptists

In 1933, The Gallatin North Missourian marked the 100th anniversary of the Grand River Church near Jameson, one of Daviess County’s oldest institutions, by printing a history compiled by Editor Allen F. Wade of the Jameson Gem. At the time of this anniversary, the church, cemetery and a nice grove was located in the country about 1.5 miles east of the town of Jameson with the property kept in splendid condition. The following is Wade’s account:

In 1933, The Gallatin North Missourian marked the 100th anniversary of the Grand River Church near Jameson, one of Daviess County’s oldest institutions, by printing a history compiled by Editor Allen F. Wade of the Jameson Gem. At the time of this anniversary, the church, cemetery and a nice grove was located in the country about 1.5 miles east of the town of Jameson with the property kept in splendid condition. The following is Wade’s account:

“The first settlement in what is now Daviess County, according to history, was made in 1831 near the center of the county. On Dec. 29, 1836, Daviess County was organized from a part of Ray County, and named in honor of Col. Jo Daviess of Kentucky. About this time the Mormons settled in the center of the county and founded old Diamon. More or less trouble existed between the Mormons and the first settlers, therefore the gentiles, as the pioneers were called, met with considerable opposition.

“Facing more or less difficulties from the beginning, the pioneers were earnest in their purposes and the first church organized in this county was a Baptist church called “Grand River” on Dec. 14, 1833, composed of the newly arrived settlers.”

The first organization consisted of 25 charter members. By this church’s 100th anniversary, 31 ministers had served the congregation with eight clerks serving over those years to look after the welfare of the church’s business.

Charter members were: Wm. Gea, Nancy Gea, John Tarwater, Ruth Tarwater, Abigail Morgan, Sarah Sherrington, George Rhodes, Delitha Rhodes, Mary Black, Libbie Tetherow, Catherine Nolan, Isaac Redding, John Muican, Elizabeth Redding, Moses Netherton, Jane Netherton, christopher Nation, Phoebe Nation, Margaret Leach, Caleb O’Dell, Isaac Smith, Katherine Smith, Benjamin Smith, Ann McBrayer, F. Leah, a colored woman.

Following is a list of pastors during this first century: Christopher Nation, Samuel Trulit, Enjamin Smith, Thomas Campbell, Benj. Wheeler, Wm. Baldwin, Jeffery Christie, John L. Netherton, James C. Poe, T.M. Kenney, Israel Christie, O.E. Newman, M.L. Kemp, Wm. Merritt, H.B. Tillery, Dan Willis, J.B. Cash, B.W. Brandom, J.H. Dotson, F.E. McNeely, E.W. Dow, Lee Moran, B. Venable, Luther Rossin, Wm. Vanover, Wm. Needham, Charles Roberts, Floyd Rolf, Roy Boatwright.

Clerks serving the congregation wer George Rhoades, Moses Netherton, S.W. Pugh, J.L. Netherton, James Roysteon, W.R. Tribbey, E.A. Croy, Virgil Jinkens.

The Famous Forum at the Wood Stove

This writer remembers as a boy the discussions by the members of “The Forum,” around that famous wood stove at the Davis Drug Store in Gallatin: the merits of the Revolutionary generals were discussed, as were those of Lee, Grant, Jackson and others of the Civil War, but it was agreed by all those generally present that Napoleon was the greatest general.

This writer remembers as a boy the discussions by the members of “The Forum,” around that famous wood stove at the Davis Drug Store in Gallatin: the merits of the Revolutionary generals were discussed, as were those of Lee, Grant, Jackson and others of the Civil War, but it was agreed by all those generally present that Napoleon was the greatest general.

To immediately get into trouble in the Forum was for some new recruit not familiar with the likes and dislikes of the different members to make some slighting remark about the generalship of Napoleon in the hearing of A.C. Ball (father of Postmaster Ball), who was one of the charter members of the Forum — when Mr. Ball got done telling the new recruit about the virtues of Napoleon, he became converted at once to Mr. Ball’s way of thinking.

But where is that famous wood stove now? Gone to the discard, and the owner of the drug store and the wood stove, D. Harfield Davis, is now in the shadows, and all the members of the original Forum, with two or three exceptions, are now in another world. The drug store is now lighted with electricity and the space that was once heated with the wood stove is now heated with a steam radiator, and there is a sign that says something about splitting on the floor, on account of it being unsanitary.

D. Harfield Davis was by common consent the president of the Forum. If the argument lagged, he knew the peculiarities of each member, and by a remark here and there touching each member at the proper place would start the argument and then he would retire and enjoy the commotion he had raised. Sometimes, if a country member came in and complained of being cold, he was taken in charge by the president and soon the voice of the cold member was louder than any of the rest.

Gallatin certainly has some unique characters. Nothing was too sacred or above being discussed by the Forum — politics, war, religion including the different modes of baptism, and even that latest fad, eugenics, was handled without gloves by the different members. David R. Mitchell, Gallatin’s odd colored character, while not a member, was a silent and interested spectator many times.

In the earlier days of the Forum, the country, in the language of the late Dr. James T. Allen, who was one of the charter members of the Forum, had not been commercialized, as he once told the writer a short time before his death.

Writer anonymous; reprinted from the Gallatin Democrat (date not confirmed)

School Consolidation (1914)

Jameson School District was the first to consolidate when voters approved the reorganization of country schools during March, 1914. When the residents of any commmunity desire to form a consolidated school district, a petition signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the community file a proposal with the county superintendent of schools. The county superintendent then plats the proposed district, determining the exact boundaries, and sets the day of election.

Jameson School District was the first to consolidate when voters approved the reorganization of country schools during March, 1914. When the residents of any commmunity desire to form a consolidated school district, a petition signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the community file a proposal with the county superintendent of schools. The county superintendent then plats the proposed district, determining the exact boundaries, and sets the day of election.

By a vote of 142-69 in balloting conducted on a Thursday afternoon, Jameson school district voters approved the consolidation of 6 country schools into one reorganized school district. Schools included in the consolidation are Jameson, Laswell, Brown, Beck, Brushy Creek and Grant.

Transportation was also an issue decided that same time at the polls. The vote count was 154-15. Pupils who live a certain distance from school are to be provided means of transportation between their homes and the school. The question of distance is to be decidded by the board of directors of the school district, probably at a mile radius.

Following this election, voters followed with an election two weeks later to decide the question of approving $20,000 in bonds for the construction of a new school building.

Consolidation of school districts is sweeping across Daviess County. Following Jameson’s decision, the Coffey district — including Coffey, McClary, Burnes, Feurt, Freeport, Shady Grove and a small part of the Everly district — will vote the following week. There is some opposition to this proposed consolidation, however.

The Blake district — including the Goodbar, McClung, Mann, Prairie Valley and Fairview schools — will also vote on consolidation on March 18, 1914.

From the Gallatin North Missourian, March 5, 1914.

Covered Bridges in Daviess County (1856)

Soon after the Stallings-Shriver Bridge washed away in 1852, the Daviess County Court started planning a new bridge over the Grand River northeast of Gallatin. The planning started in June, 1853, with the appointment of John B. Comer as commissioner to plan for the bridge — a “Buckingham” or covered bridge.

Soon after the Stallings-Shriver Bridge washed away in 1852, the Daviess County Court started planning a new bridge over the Grand River northeast of Gallatin. The planning started in June, 1853, with the appointment of John B. Comer as commissioner to plan for the bridge — a “Buckingham” or covered bridge.

A bridge as first proposed at Shriver’s Mill (Mill Dam) but the idea was rejected by the county court on May 3, 1854. Then the court ordered Mr. Comer to let the contract for a wooden bridge on an arch plan, with stone abuttments at Adkinson’s Ford. Comer was instructed to supervise construction. Notice of the contact was advertised in the Bruswicker and Richmond Mirror, to be awarded on the first Monday of July, 1854. This was later delayed to the second Monday in August with the contract readvertised in the Missouri Sun.

The contract was awarded to James C. Heaton for $7,000. It was to be completed by May 5, 1856. The bridge was described as a “Buckingham Bridge” (covered with a good shingle roof). It was to be located 1-1/4 mile northeast of Gallatin, causing more business to pass through Gallatin. There were to be two stone peers on either bank of the river, 160 feet apart. The peers were to be 30 feet high and taper to 4×6-1/2 feet at the top. The bridge was ready to be “raised” (an old term for post and beam assembly) on May 8, 1855. But other work was not compelted by the contract date due to high water.

The contract was renegotiated on May 8, 1856. Heaton was required to add a protection wall on the east bank, and $2,000 in payment was withheld until completion of that work. In addition, a $4,000 surety bond was required for construction and service for three years. At this time, a road was approved by the county from the east end of the bridge to Auberry Grove. The bridge must have been completed by June, 1856, since Heaton was then paid $900 for a similar covered bridge across the old bed of Honey Creek, south of Gallatin.

The Adkinson-Heaton covered bridge probably failed by March, 1857, since a ferry license was sold to Daniel Culter on the Gallatin-Chillicothe road; George N. Rogers bought a ferry license at Shriver’s Mill in parternership with Andrew Shriver.

Another bridge across the Grand River was not considered by the county court until Feb. 5, 1869. Free ferries and low water crossigns were considered during this 12-year period of time. The iron bridge, Smith Patent Truss Bridge,” became available here in 1869 and two were built by C.W. Wheeler on the Grand River in Daviess County. The one near Gallatin was called the Roger’s Ferry Bridge. It is rememberd now as the old wagon bridge, in use for over 100 years. Evidence of this bridge may currently be seen 1/4-mile above the Highway 6&13 bridge near Gallatin.

Written by David Stark, Gallatin, in June, 1990.

Townsend Block Lost to Fire (1914)

Opera House in Gallatin destroyed by fire in 1914. Blaze of unknown origin causes a $40,000 loss and makes a spectacular sight when the whole east side of the Gallatin business square and the YMCA Building are threatened. Nothing in the Townsend Block is saved, and only part is covered by insurance.

Opera House in Gallatin destroyed by fire in 1914. Blaze of unknown origin causes a $40,000 loss and makes a spectacular sight when the whole east side of the Gallatin business square and the YMCA Building are threatened. Nothing in the Townsend Block is saved, and only part is covered by insurance.

One of the fiercest and most destructive fires ever in Gallatin occurred when the Townsend block — located on the southeast corner of the public square — and the Knight barn across the alley to the east are burned.

The fire was discovered about 4am on a Friday by Jno. T. Kimsey and John Hinkle who have rooms on the second floor of the First National Bank buildling directly across the street. They were awakened by the noise of breaking glass and the roar of the flames. An alarm was given at once, but nothing could be done. Fire hose was in bad condition and it was several minutes before water could be thrown on the fire.

Fire evidently started in the south room of the block, occupied by Killam & Sons furniture store. The front end of this room was seething with flames when the plate glass front gave way, allowing flames to rush out with an ominous roar. They shot upward to a great height and with much force, and soon the second story was ablaze. By this time the fire had spread to the north room and was burning fiercely. The flames leaped across the stairway and enveloped the Mann grocery store in their fiery embrace.

The Arbelia Opera House and the Wilson cigar factory next fed the fire and burned like chaff. So rapidly did the fire spread that within 20 minutes from the time of the first alarm it was evident that the entire block was doomed. The Knight barn on the east, occupied by Dr. S.E. Sullivan as a livery barn and veterinary hospital, was next attacked. The fire shot across the narrow alley and soon the whole structure was on fire. Fifteen horses and most of the vehicles had been removed, but the loss on hay and grain is considerable.

The YMCA Building (later to become Gallatin’s city hall) was saved by a determined effort on the part of firemen. But it was damaged by heat and water. The Davis building, across the street to the north of the Townsend Block, was badly damaged by fire and water with all door and window casings burned away. For a time it seemed as if this building would go thus endangering the whole east side of the square, but firemen finally controlled the flames.

The First National Bank building was damaged by the terrific heat. Windows were melted and the varnish and paint inside blistered. The Comstock building, adjoining the Townsend Block on the immediate south, caught fire on its roof but a bucket brigade of men, women, boys and girls helped Davis Hill save his property. The Christian Church roof was on fire several times but was closely watched by Alva Pettijohn and Nelse O’Bryant.

The same block burned on May 4, 1890, with only Townsend’s three brick store rooms on the corner left standing. The block also caught fire from an explosion in a cleaning establishment, on the second floor in 1913.

This fire of 1914 was an imposing spectacle to behold as it grasped the buildings in its destructive embrace and shot high into the air, lighting up the town and heavens so brightly that it could be seen for many miles. The following is a summary of the loss:

  • Mrs. Arbeila Townsend, Arbelia Opera House block (the opera house and three store rooms), loss $15,000, with $7,500 insurance
  • Mann Bros Grocery, loss on stock $4,000 with $1,700 insurance
  • W.D. Wilson cigar manufacturer (in second story of Arbelia Block), $800 in stock
  • Killam Furniture Company, loss $4,000 on stock with $3,300 insurance
  • Newton Knight, building valued at $8,000 with no insurance
  • Dr. S.E. Sullivan, loss on feed, veterinary instruments, and medicine, about $500, with no insurance
  • Davis Hill, loss on barn $500, with $200 insurance
  • O.E. Comstock (a meat market in a 2-story building), damage to building $300 covered by insurance; a high solid north firewall saved this building from further damage

The Daviess County Telephone Company suffered heavy damage by the burning of the large cables and wires and poles. The Davis building, north, and the First National Bank building, west, were also damaged.

Reprinted from the Gallatin Democrat and the Gallatin North Missourian, Nov. 26, 1914.

East Side of Square Escapes Fire (1928)

In 1928 fire consumed the Connell Warehouse, threatening the entire east side of the Gallatin business square. The rear end of every building located across the alley from the warehouse was on fire a number of times that fateful night, but hard work and action by local fire fighters kept the flames from spreading.

In 1928 fire consumed the Connell Warehouse, threatening the entire east side of the Gallatin business square. The rear end of every building located across the alley from the warehouse was on fire a number of times that fateful night, but hard work and action by local fire fighters kept the flames from spreading.

The warehouse, also known as the George Aid warehouse, was located on East Jackson street — just east of what was then the Gallatin post office. The building was used by the C.K. Connell Hardware Company for storage, a building previously owned by N.G. Cruzen. The origin of the fire was unknown.

Nightwatchman Bill Runnels discovered the blaze at 2:30 a.m. May 16, 1928, and some time passed before a body of men could respond to fight the fire. The fire gained such headway that chemicals were of no benefit, so as quickly as possible four streams of water were employed. The rear end of every building located across the alley was on fire a number of times. Druggist Don R. King says when he arrived on the scene, all he had any hopes of saving was his books and records. The first thing C.K. Connel did upon entering his store was to remove some dynamite and caps from the rear of the place, then attach a garden hose to an inside faucet and put out the fire which had caught around the door and windows.

The fire alarm in Gallatin at this time was inadequate. Many merchants whose place of business was threatened had to be called by telephone or someone sent to their homes, although not much could be done by anyone. After the fire was out, community leaders called for the mayor and city council to condemn wooden buildings erected at the rear end of business buildings. 

Several fire fighters received praise for exemplary effort, especially A.F. Seller and E.S. Gregory who faced a burning heat and flying sparks and cinders to play the first stream of water on the fire. Joe Tate and Max Venable supplied the fighters with chemical tanks which were very useful in putting out fire around window sills and casings without breaking the glass or damaging fixtures within.

The warehouse building and its contents were a total loss; the loss of machinery alone is estimated at $3,000 to Connell Hardware.

Reprinted from the Gallatin Democrat, May 17, 1928

Telephone Emerged in Daviess County in 1901

The Daviess County Telephone Company (DCTC) was originally incorporated Jan. 15, 1901, with 200 shares of common stock at $25 par value. An additional 400 shares at the same par value were authorized Jan. 7, 1913. Mr. Penn Love, phone #400 office and #240 residence, ran the DCTC and records of outside services contracted for by him from 1910-11. A city ordinance of Gallatin dated Feb. 6,1905, authorized a telephone system in Gallatin by this company.

The Daviess County Telephone Company (DCTC) was originally incorporated Jan. 15, 1901, with 200 shares of common stock at $25 par value. An additional 400 shares at the same par value were authorized Jan. 7, 1913. Mr. Penn Love, phone #400 office and #240 residence, ran the DCTC and records of outside services contracted for by him from 1910-11. A city ordinance of Gallatin dated Feb. 6,1905, authorized a telephone system in Gallatin by this company.

Gallatin had magneto (crank) phones until Dec. 29, 1956, when dial service was first installed. In 1905, crank phone service was $1 per month for residences and $1.60 per month for business wall phones. Desk phones were available for 25 cents per month. Gallatin was paid a franchise fee of $25 per year. In 1911 the business wall phone rate was increased to $2 per month.

This newspaper photo shows Elizabeth Love, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Penn Love, at the switchboard of the Daviess County Telephone Company in 1913.

Starting in 1916, officers of the DCTC were President Penn Love, Vice President Charles Hemry, and Secretary/Treasurer H.Y. Tarwater, phone #300 office nad #214 residence. In 1917 W.C. Gillihan, phone #64, replaced Mr. Hemry as vice president.

DCTC was reorganized Oct. 1, 1921, and E.O. Turner was president and general manager. Te other officers were from St. Louis and they included E.F. Carter, vice president; J.P. Crowley, secretary; and R.A. Nicherson, treasurer. This reorganized company was purchased by the Inter-County Telephone Company (ICTC) in 1927. The new general manager was Joe M. Roberts of Maysville, who moved his family to Gallatin in 1929. Mr. Roberts moved to Columbia in 1963 and was president of the company at that time. It was later renamed the Missouri Telephone Company.

Daviess County Telephone Company began operations in 1901, reorganized then purchased by Inter-County Telephone Company in 1927, later renamed Missouri Telephone Company. Switchboard operators worked to provide customer service, connecting caller to local residences and businesses.

In May, 1929, ICTC purchased the Gallatin Trust Company building for $7,000 from Chrles and Carrie Kanuer. ICTC owned several phone exchanges in and around Daviess County at that time and ran them from Gallatin.

In 1929 the phone rates were as follows: rural service $1 per month, rural busienss $2 per month, city business $3 per month, and $1 for additional extensions. The city one-party residence rate was $1.75 a month and 50 cents for an extension. The rural residence rate, one party, was $1.65 a month and a party line of five or more parties was 65 cents a month. The above charges were made once per year in March and had to be paid in advance.

Some interesting phone numbers for Gallatin from a 1904 phone book are: D.H. Davis and sons #3, Democrat office #10, county clerk’s office #30, J.W. Alexander #29, McClasky Barn #20, U.S. Express Company #207, J.H. Townsend #2, Wabash Depot #4, Wabash Hotel #236, Windson Hotel #11, Woodruff Hotel #72, Wes L. Robertson residence #0, Dr. C.O. Netherton #1, North Missourian #12.

There may also be interest in who didn’t have a phone number in this 1904 book. The city clerk had one (#206) but the city police and the county sheriff’s office did not. The Rock Island Depot had no phone and none were losted for the school, fire department, nor for the post office. Sheriff Robert McCray had a residence phone (#122).

Written by David Stark, Gallatin, published in March, 1994, in the Gallatin North Missourian; researched from information provided by the Missouri Telephone Association.

This photo simply identified as “Telephone Building,” date unknown. Located at the northwest corner of the Gallatin business square.