USN Capt. James A. Shreckengaust

Vietnam War veteran James A. Shreckengaust is among those from Daviess County achieving high military rank. The native of Pattonsburg (PHS Class of 1954) retired after 34 years as a captain in the United States Navy.

Although he had many assignments, Shreckengaust was most proud of being the commanding officer of the military sea lift command in the Indian Ocean and Executive Officer of the USS Oklahoma City, Seventh Fleet Flagship home ported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Shreckengaust received his Bachelors of Mechanical Engineering from the University of Missouri and his Master’s in Computer Systems Management from the Naval Post Graduate School.

He was born Sept. 12, 1937, to Ralph and Vera (Campbell) Shreckengaust in Daviess County. He married Shirlene Huntsberger on Dec. 23, 1962. The couple raised three daughters, Jill Simmons (Dennis), Virginia Beach, VA; Robyn Lakamsani (Vamsee), Livermore, CA; and Karen Hanley (Michael), Austin, TX.; and have four grandchildren, Alexandra and Katherine Simmons and Sarada and Hansa Lakamsani. His sister is Reva Lupfer, McFall, MO.

He died Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, at Heartland Regional Medical Center in St. Joseph, MO.

Commander James A. Shreckengaust, the commanding officer of the military sea lift command in the Indian Ocean and Executive Officer of the U.S.S Oklahoma City, Seventh Fleet Flagship home ported in Yokosuka, Japan. Shreckengaust, 76, of St. Joseph, MO, died on Feb. 26, 2014, at Heartland Regional Medical Center. He is buried at Leavenworth National Cemetery.

1973 Flood Waterlogs Pattonsburg

Daviess County is rebounding from the most severe flooding of the Grand River since the 1947 flood. Pattonsburg was hard hit this time with three-fourths of the community under water for about three days; farmers all along the river are suffering varying degrees of crop damage.

Accurate estimates of flood damage are hard to come by. Figures suppied by the ASC office to government officials indicate $3 to $4 million in crop damage and another million in damage to property, machinery, etc. But at least one bank official in the county said that, in his opinion, the total damage could approach $10 million or more.

This aerial photo was taken when flooding was near its crest with 9 uptown businesses and homes throughout Pattonsburg damaged by flood waters.

The American Red Cross made a tour of Pattonsburg and came up with 35 homes with major damage, 70 homes with lesser damage, and 14 mobile homes with major damage.

The crop damage is not confined only to those crops in the bottoms — but also to those crops on higher ground which were thoroughly soaked by the heavy rain which caused the flooding. The flooding resulted from heavy rain to the north wne west which descended on the county via Grand River, Grindstone, Sampson and Big Creek. The amount of rainfall above Daviess County varied from 4 to 6 inches on ground previously saturated from heavy rain.

A number of people were evacuated by boat while some merely walked through the water; in some areas of Pattonsburg the water rose to about four feet or higher. During the height of the flooding, the only entry into Pattonsburg was by boat or walking the railroad tracks. Hundreds of sightseers gathered.

A wide area of Northwest Missouri was declared a disaster area by Gov. Kit Bond and federal government designations are also anticipated.

At Gallatin, the water rose into the MFA and also into Froman Elevator areas east of the river for the first time since it was built. Water crept into the city’s sewage treatment plant settling basins. A sand plant and new ready-mix plant equipment were all under water.

The river’s crest nearly equaled the mark set in 1947 in some locations but fell short in others. It is believed this is due to the location of the tributaries which fed the flood, as well as the contour of the land which has drastically altered since 1947 by drainage projects and commercial uses.

At Jameson, the high water makres of prior floods in 1909 and 1947 were not approached — the level of the water at the Lewis Mill Bridge, for example, lacking 32 inches of hitting the 1947 mark.

Leland Stitt looks on the rising flood waters of the Grand River, standing on the Lewis Mill Bridge near Jameson. On the bridge beam, above the arm of Dale Alexander, is the high water mark of the 1909 flood; below his arm is the high water mark of the 1947 flood. The 1973 flood crest was approximately 32 inches lower than the 1909 mark.

The major flooding has left the county and areas from Livingston County south to the river’s mouth at flood stage. Fortunately, the rain to the south was not nearly as heavy as in the north — had it been, the losses would have been far worse. As it is, the Grand River was spread all over the bottom from Albany to Brunswick.

There are two ironies connected wit the flood. The first was that Congress approved an immediate start on the reservoir project on Friday, not being aware that a serious flood was in progress as they voted.

The second irony was that the S.O.S. organization, which had invited city people to come up Sundy for a tour of the area as part of their strategy to get public opinion against the reservoir, had to postpone the even because of flooding.

Congressman Jerry Litton has kept in close touch with the river situation, having suffered personal losses in the past floods himself. He flew over the flooded areas last weekend and had photos taken of the flood. He has requested President Nixon to declare the region a disaster area and provide federal disaster relief programs and benefits.

 

–taken from the Gallatin North Missourian Oct. 18, 1973

 

Unusual Weather, Flood Stages Recorded

The year of 1936 was remarkable for the grasshoppers eating all vegetation, including the bark off trees. The following year was also a “grasshopper” year. But 1937 is remembered for another weather-related hardship. Daviess County was covered with a heavy coat of ice for 5 consecutive weeks — the ice was 5 inches thick!

On May 3, 1943, it began raining and rainfall didn’t stop for three weeks. Water overflowed into the Grand River bottoms. By June 11, 1943, the river reached the 28-ft. flood stage. It rained on Easter Sunday (April 25, 1943) and rained on seven consecutive Sundays.

On Dec. 18, 1945, Daviess County endured a 9-inch snowfall with the temperature at 11 degrees below zero.

Snowfall on Dec. 23-24, 1958, measured 15 inches deep with temperatures at 22 degrees below zero.

July 1975 was the driest July since 1888, according to an article published in the Kansas City Times. Only .25 of an inch of rainfall was recorded at the weather station at Kansas City International Airport, breaking the prvious dry record of .36 of an inch set in July, 1936. Average precipitation for this month, according to the National Weather Service, is 4.37 inches.

FLOOD STAGES:

The following flood stage measurements, spanning 42 years, were recorded by Mrs. Russ (Alma) Wilson for local records:

  • July 7, 1909 — 39.06 feet
  • July 2, 1915 — 36.06 feet
  • May 15, 1916 — 34.0 feet
  • May 28, 1917 — 36.0 feet
  • March 16, 1919 — 34.03 feet
  • April 11, 1919 — 25.0 feet
  • May 5, 1919 — 34.03 feet
  • June 5, 1919 — 34.03 feet
  • March 27, 1920 — 27.04 feet
  • July 12, 1922 — 36.05 feet
  • July 1, 1924 — 30.05 feet
  • Sept. 17, 1926 — 36.09 feet
  • Oct. 5, 1926 — 34.03 feet
  • April 21, 1927 — 33.0 feet
  • June 4, 1927 — 30.0 feet
  • June 19, 1928 — 29.07 feet
  • July 24, 1928 — 32.08 feet
  • Sept. 15, 1928 — 31.04 feet
  • Oct. 18, 1928 — 30.0 feet
  • Nov. 19, 1928 — 35.05 feet
  • April 4, 1929 — 33.06 feet
  • June 2, 1929 — 37.07 feet
  • July 7, 2919 — 33.07 feet
  • Nov. 16, 1931 — 29.03 feet
  • Nov. 25, 1931 — 33.0 feet
  • Jan. 2, 1932 — 32.0 feet
  • June, 1935 — over high bottoms
  • June 11, 1941 — 27.04 feet
  • June 22, 1942 — 31.05 feet
  • May 5, 1943 — over low bottoms
  • June 11, 1943 — 28.0 feet
  • April 24, 1944 — 31.05 feet
  • May 17, 1945 — 30.03 feet
  • April 26, 1945 — 28.06 feet
  • Jan. 8, 1946 — over low bottoms
  • June 8, 1947 — 33.03 feet
  • June 22, 1947 — 34.85 feet
  • July 7, 1951 — 28.0 feet
  • Oct. 13, 1973 — 32 feet

Distinguished Flying Cross to Capt. Jim Sears, Jr. for Heroism Against Taliban

Awarded for actions during the Global War on Terror

General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Central Command Air Force (USCENTAF), Special Orders G-334 (August 21, 2002)

Distinguished Flying Cross

Action Date: January 20, 2002
Service: U.S. Air Force
Rank: Captain
Company: 18th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross with Combat “V” to Captain James R. Sears, Jr., United States Air Force, for heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as F-16CG flight lead, 18th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron on 20 January 2002.

Captain Sears distinguished himself as On Scene Commander for a downed CH-53 in a heavily defended area of Taliban control in Northern Afghanistan during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. During the Combat Search and Rescue he organized, directed, and controlled a total of 13 aircraft including three Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, five helicopters, one C-130, two F-16s, and two F-18s. He rapidly developed a deconfliction plan that ensured the safety of all assets and allowed them to operate within a five nautical mile radius of the downed helicopter. After receiving the initial coordinates of the crash site he realized they were over one nautical mile off the actual location in heavily mountainous terrain.

After a diligent, methodical search of the area, Captain Sears was able to get his eyes on the site, provide a perfect talk-on for his wingman, and direct the other support assets to the crash site. Using on-board sensors, Captain Sears was quickly able to pass updated coordinates to the thousandth of a degree to command and control agencies without compromising the safety of the entire rescue operation. He expertly sanitized the 60 nautical mile ingress and egress route through enemy territory.

Captain Sears then executed the demanding task of rescue escort for two helicopters. This involved maintaining visual contact and constant coverage while flying over 300 knots faster and being 15,000 feet higher than the helicopters. Captain Sears, in conjunction with command and control assets, coordinated a plan to move three separate tankers close enough to the crash site to ensure constant command for the entire time on scene.

Captain Sears’ flawless flight leadership allowed him to intercept and visually identify a Red Cross aircraft flying in the vicinity of the downed helicopter, not identifiable by electronic means or talking to command and control assets, ensuring the safety of the entire rescue effort. Captain Sears passed off On Scene Commander duties to two United States Navy F-18s after 4.5 hours on scene.

Captain Sears’ tireless efforts and tremendous focus was unprecedented considering in his single-seat F-16 he flew more than 3500 miles, logged 11.1 hours, and ten air refuelings requiring more than 120,000 pounds of fuel to be onloaded through hostile territory. Captain Sears’ courage, superior airmanship, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of personal danger were instrumental in accomplishing this hazardous mission and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force.

[Source: http://valor.militarytimes.com/recipient.php?recipientid=5557]

Daviess County Library Begins in 1947

The Daviess County Library was established as a county library by the voters in the spring of 1947. Miss Leona Funk was the first librarian followed by Mrs. Ross (Ina) Naylor, Betty Price, and then Jan Johnson (who retired in September, 2016, succeeded by Allison Spidle in October, 2016).

Prior to Jan’s promotion to the position of director, Jan had been a member of the staff and an active patron. In addition, Jan’s mother, Hazel Gibbens, was also on the staff and served as interim director.

At the time of Jan’s appointment to director in 1979, the library had already moved from its original location in the Van Dyke Building on North Main Street to the historic, Victorian two-story home at 215 North Main.

“The old building did not comply with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act,” Jan said. “Even after building a ramp, the building was crowded and spacing was a problem. It was like overnight the building was no longer adequate for a library.”

Jan remembers that the first half of the 1990s was a period of major changes. In 1992, county residents were asked to vote an increase in the tax levy. “That was something I lost sleep over,” said Jan. But the voters came through, and the tax levy went from 10 to 20 cents per $100 of the assessed value.

In 1993, the Pattonsburg branch, which opened in 1952, was closed due to the 100 Year Flood….”Seeing the pictures of all the books underwater, it was hard to take.”

Daviess County Library, housed in the 1900 Queen Anne style residence on N. Main Street, Gallatin

In December, 1995, the county library relocated to 306 West Grand, Gallatin. The building which previously housed a car dealership, was purchased using a matching federal grant $131,500 for a total of $263,000. It was the last year federal funds would be available for any type of library construction or renovation. The staff moved 30,000 books, five years of 40 magazine subscriptions, videos, cassettes, shelves, cabinets, microfilm paperbacks, computers and numerous heavy items (an atlas stand weighed 150 pounds!).

“Using federal funds, which were later audited, and working with architects and contractors was not part of most librarian’s job descriptions,” Jan said. “Many decisions made during the building process were a learning process for me.”

Board President Daren Adkins said he admired Jan’s calm and poise as she kept the library fully functioning and open to the public through its move in 1995 and its many other renovations in the years to follow.

“She spearheaded the move in 1995 and that was a big job,” he said. “Through the years, she has led the process of digitilization and electronics and she has been instrumental in writing numerous grants that allowed many new programs and services.”

INTERIOR IMPROVEMENTS:

In December of 1995, the lower level community room was renovated through a gift of $100,000 from Farmers Bank of Northern Missouri, formerly First National Bank of Gallatin.

In April of 2014 a new reading area opened. This donation was in memory of Lloyd and Helen Weldon and their family. After Lloyd’s death Helen remarried and was later known to many as Helen Burge. The 15 foot by 45 foot reading area is located in the north end of the library. New furnishings included comfortable egg chairs, sofas, conference table and chairs. Custom made bookcases now divide the area into three sections. Modern lighting and wall art complete the contemporary look.

EXTERIOR IMPROVEMENTS:

Since 1995 the library was also able to make several exterior improvements, including a new roof, a synthetic stucco finish, metal coping on parapet walls, metal canopies over main and community room entrances, and larger, bolder signage on east side of building.

The community parking areas were paved; automatic door openers were installed; the southern library boundaries were expanded and fenced, and several areas were landscaped.

Gifts and donations which helped make the renovations possible included a contribution from the Franklin Wilder Estate of around $45,000 in 2005, and a $20,000 gift from BTC bank in 2008.

MODERN INSIDE AND OUT:

The Daviess County Library is modern inside and out – and it features a lot more that just books.

Today the library offers special areas and services to meet the desires of all users: children’s castle, children’s computer area, teen section, public computers, hi-speed wireless Internet, computer lab, digital format in the genealogy department, gaming programs, electronic books, to name a few.

The Daviess County Library accepts as its basic objectives the provision and servicing of selected books and other materials which aid the individual in the pursuit of education, information or research, and in the creative use of leisure time.

“Updates and improvements are vital,” said Jan. “But it’s equally important for the staff to maintain a personal, friendly relationship with our library patrons.”

East side main entrance (under doorway canopy at left) into the Daviess County Library (2017)
Community Center entrance on west side of Daviess County Library (2017)

Many other fine features and furnishings in the library today would not have been possible if not for the donations and efforts of individuals, groups, and businesses.

  • April 16, 2014 New Reading Area in Library Set to Open. This donation is in memory of Lloyd and Helen Weldon and their family. After Lloyd’s death Helen remarried and was later known to many as Helen Burge.
  • Nov. 8, 2013  iPad the Fad at County Library
  • Aug. 2, 2013 A new bench is ready for outside seating. Greg Houghton designed, built, and set this bench in memory of his mother, Nancy Houghton, who was an avid reader and supporter of the library.
  • April 2013 Through a gift from the Lake Viking Homemakers, the Daviess County Library has purchased a digital image converter that converts old slides.
  • April 2013 Secretary of State Jason Kander announced the Daviess County Library received a Nonfiction Collection Makeover Grant in the amount of $4,000.
  • February 2013 Secretary of State Jason Kander announced Daviess County Library received service and programming funds in the amount of $10,699.43.
  • October 2012 E-Readers available for check out at Library.
  • August 2012 Jone Perry retired after 23 years.
  • July 2012 Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan has announced the Daviess County Library received an eReader Exploration Grant in the amount of $1,580.
  • June 2012 Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan recently announced the Daviess County Library received a Website Makeover Grant totaling $4,707.
  • April 2012 Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan recently announced the Daviess County Library received a Targeted Collection Development Grant in the amount of $1,200.
  • November 2011 Daviess County library offering online classes.
  • July 2011 Low vision aids available at the county library.
  • May 2011 Anita J. (Janie) Dunning, Missouri USDA Rural Development State Director, announced funding of $15,750 to the Daviess County Library to install a new roof on the library.
  • November 2010 The Daviess County Library 2010 book budget was increased by almost 33% through a Missouri State Targeted Collection Grant.
  • June 2010 County library receives grant for 11 new computers The total grant amount was $9,900.
  • Oct. 2009 Daviess County Library is now a wi-fi hotspot
  • Aug. 2009 Mary Jo Pittsenbarger uses her artistic skills to paint the book-shaped pillars at the Daviess County Library.
  • July 2009 Daviess County Library receives over $5,000 from Gates Foundation
  • May 2009 The Daviess County Library has received a Missouri State Library Technology Mini Grant in the amount of $5,241.
  • October 2008 BTC Bank recently presented $20,000 to the Daviess County Library to be used toward exterior renovation of the library.
  • February 2007 The Daviess County Library received notification from the State Library and the Secretary of State’s office that it had been approved for an LSTA Teen Space program grant of $9,000.
  • May 2006 The Daviess County Library and the Gallatin First Christian Church are recipients of a very generous donation from the estate of the late Franklin Wilder. The library and church each received $25,000 about halfway through the probate proceedings from the sell of real estate. Both distributees have $19,919 still coming along with four gas wells which have been inventoried
  • May 18, 2005 Retirement reception for Jean Fales
  • December 2004 Gallatin DAR presents flag to library
  • September 2004 Improvements underway at library, new sign will be added
  • May 2004 Daviess County Library receives grant to host fair for senior citizens The library has received a $1,240 Federal IMLA/LSTA grant
  • January 2003 Computer classes offered at public library
  • February 2002 Raffle winners donate Big Screen for public use at county library Access II fund raiser helps make everyone a winner!
  • October 2001 County library receives $44,620 grant Secretary of State Matt Blunt in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s U.S. Library Program announces grants totaling $44,620 for the Daviess County Library System for computer hardware, software, training, and technical support. The library will receive a cash grant for computers, a laser printer, and wiring costs.
  • March 2001 The Daviess County Library was awarded a $6,517 grant from the Missouri State Library to purchase two new computers.
  • March 2001 The Verda Clements Memorial Fund has placed a piano in the Daviess County Community Room.
  • August 2000 Improvements at the Daviess County Library in Gallatin are being funded by Public Library Equalization funding received locally for the second consecutive year. County Librarian Jan Johnson says over $17,000 received here financed book purchases boosting the young adult book series, the audio book department and computer technology at Gallatin and at the Jamesport branch.
  • July 2000 Helen Muller caps 24 years serving on the library board
  • June 1999 A new parking lot is completed and other exterior remodeling projects are in progress this summer at the Daviess County Library in Galatin. A fund raising drive in support of the project is still in progress. The project is estimated at $37,500. Fund raising efforts have thus far raised $28,400. The library is still accepting donations and the library staff hopes the work can be done completely with contributions. Those donating $25 or more will receive a canvas book bag with the library logo printed on the front. Present donations have ranged from $1.00 to $1,000.00.
  • December 1995 The library relocated in the building at 306 West Grand, Gallatin in 1995, using a matching federal grant ($131,500) for a total of $263,000, which was the last year that federal funds have been available for any type of library construction or renovation.
  • December 1995 The lower level community room was renovated through gift of $100,000 from Farmers Bank of Northern Missouri, formerly First National Bank of Gallatin.

Honor Flight an Emotional Trip for Korean War Veteran Jim Edwards

When Korean War

veteran Jim Edwards of Jamesport and 55 other veterans aboard Honor Flight arrived in Washington, D.C., they were met by a crowd of people who applauded, shook their hands, and thanked them for their service.

“It was pretty emotional,” Jim said. “It was a long day and exhausting — but well worth it.”

The group had to be at the airport by 4 a.m. for the American Airlines flight. They left Kansas City at 6:30 a.m. on Nov. 3, 2016, and arrived back at 10:30 p.m. the same day.

Honor Flight Network is a non-profit organization created solely to honor America’s veterans for all their sacrifices. Honor Flight transports our heroes to Washington, D.C. to visit and reflect at the memorials dedicated to honor the service and sacrifices of themselves and their friends. Top priority is given to the senior veterans – World War II survivors, along with those other veterans who may be terminally ill.

Of Jim’s group of 55 veterans, 30 were in wheelchairs. Each veteran was to have a guardian who assisted them. Jim’s guardian was his daughter, Jill. Jill also assisted another veteran, Dean Weddle, 90, of Allendale, after Dean’s own guardian couldn’t make the trip.

After arriving at Reagan Airport, the group got on two tour buses led by a motorcycle cop who buzzed them through all the stoplights to the World War II memorial. There they saw the laying of the wreath ceremony. Next was the Korean and Vietnam and Lincoln Memorials. A group photo was taken at the Iwo Jima Memorial. Then they departed for Arlington National Cemetery to view the “Changing of the Guard” at the tomb of the unknown soldier. There are over 400,000 graves at Arlington. Lastly they viewed the Air Force Memorial, which is a fairy new addition. Jim said the tour bus drove by the Pentagon building and also the White House.

Jim is a veteran of the Korean War, having served from 1951-1955. He was an SK2 in the Navy, stationed in San Diego. He was in the service for nine months when he married his childhood sweetheart, Janene. Two of their four children were born in San Diego. Janene passed away 11 years ago and they lost a daughter.

Veteran Jim Edwards of Jamesport with pilot, Jared Williams

 

 

Jim did not know any of the other veterans on the Honor Flight. But he did know the pilot, Jared Williams, the son of a family friend from Jamesport. Jared’s grandfather was aboard a World War Two destroyer at Leyte Gulf, the second battle of the Philippine Sea and the largest naval battle in history. Jared was proud to display his grandfather’s honor flag in the window of the plane. Jim and Jill got some special treatment since they knew the pilot. They were ushered first on the airplane and got to sit in the cockpit for some pictures.

In Washington, D.C., Jim was also surprised and pleased that a grandson, Bryce Hughes, who works at an IRS building, came to the memorials to visit with him.

The group of veterans arrived back home at about 10:30 p.m.

“When we arrived in Kansas City, there were two- or three-hundred people lined up to greet us,” Jim said. “They cheered and banged drums and gave us lots of farewell hugs. I came back with videos, pictures, and wonderful memories.”

Gallatin’s Dr. Larry Dickinson Awarded Family Physician of the Year (2017)

Larry Dickinson, D.O., family physician in Gallatin, was awarded the 2017 Osteopathic Family Physician of the Year Award by the Missouri Society of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians (MSACOFP).

Dr. Dickinson was honored at a ceremony on Jan. 28, 2017, at the Hilton Garden Inn in Independence, MO, during the 2017 MSACOFP Winter Scientific Seminar. The prestigious award is given to an osteopathic family physician who exemplifies the principles of osteopathic family medicine via outstanding accomplishments and service for the betterment of the osteopathic profession. He was nominated by John R. Sparks, D.O.

Dr. Larry Dickinson, Gallatin

Dr. Dickinson is a 1975 graduate of A.T. Still University – Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, MO. He has been in private practice for over 40 years and is an active staff member at Hedrick Medical Center in Chillicothe. He is board certified in family medicine by the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians. Dr. Dickinson has been active with the MSACOFP for many years and served on the Board of Governors from 2010-2012.

Dr. Dickinson also served the Missouri Association of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (MAOPS) on its Board of Trustees and as a delegate at its House of Delegates.

Larry grew up on the family farm in “beautiful downtown Carlow” in Daviess County and they still own the farm.

Growing up on the farm, Larry dealt with runts and sickly animals on a regular basis. And he found that if he took care of them, they usually lived. And when they lived, they became his property. “I made money that way,” he said. He was actually born at Hedrick Medical Center and graduated from Gallatin R-5 High School in 1968.

His experience with small animals made him a hero to his young children when he saved their ailing pets, at one time even using an IV to care for a small dog with a flailed chest. The dog lived to a ripe old age.

Dr. Dickinson stopped delivering babies in 2004, due to the high cost of malpractice insurance. With malpractice insurance so high, after 28 years and roughly 2,000 deliveries (1,864 after coming to Gallatin, not counting the babies delivered in training), he made the decision to quit.

The last baby he delivered was on Nov. 10, 2004. He recalls that all of the OB nurses at Hedrick gathered for that last delivery, just to mark the milestone. There were so many nurses in the room that the mother asked if it was normal to have so many. But they were celebrating his last delivery. “Quitting was like withdrawal,” he said. “And we had an empty nest at the same time.”

When Dr. Dickinson first started his practice, there were eight physicians in Daviess County alone, and there were seven doctors making deliveries at Hedrick in 1976.

Larry and Patty met while he was in medical school at Kirksville. Patty was working toward a degree in Special Ed and Learning Disabilities. Larry graduated on June 4, 1975, and the two were married three days later.

Patty spent some time in her chosen profession. She set up the K-12 programs for Special Ed and Learning Disabilities in Ashley, Michigan, Bowling Green, Missouri, and Gallatin, where she taught for three years.

But when Larry needed help at his office in Gallatin, Patty volunteered. They’ve worked in tandem since 1976. “We were newlyweds,” said Larry. “And we just didn’t see much of each other.”

The benefits of working together are many. “When you get home you don’t have to tell the story over again. She already knows it,” said Larry.

Together, Larry and Patty delivered 14 babies in his office. “She can hand me the right instruments, while holding a baby on her hip … at 1 a.m. in the morning. She is very adept!” Patty stayed at home for a few years when their kids were small, but then started bringing them to the office, the best kind of daycare … with both mom and dad around.

Larry and Patty built their home east of Gallatin on Highway O in 1989.

Both of the Dickinsons’ children have pursued careers in the medical field. Their son Patrick and his wife Ashley reside in Valparaiso, Ind. Patrick is in anesthesia as a CRNA and Ashley is the Chief Operating Officer of Porter Hospital in Valparaiso. Kari and her husband Eric Genenbacher reside in Mesa, Ariz., where they are busy with Eric’s dental practice and raising their daughter Reese and son Rhett.

Since Dr. Dickinson’s office is equidistant between four hospitals, many trauma victims are actually brought to his office to stabilize. He has dealt with many industrial accidents, as well as agricultural accidents.

“If you do what you’re trained to do, I can’t imagine not being kind and genuine as part of this vocation. It’s second nature, because it helps a lot of people more than medicine, especially patients who are terminal or have a disease that can’t be cured. And I always tell my young mothers that I don’t mind if they call me at home, because we’re both more comfortable knowing that the baby is ok. And it is great to have the privilege of taking care of five generations of a family, too.”

In 1983, the Columbia Missourian did a story on Dr. Dickinson, because his name kept cropping up in the university’s sociology studies concerning country doctors and doctor shortages. He has a long list of professional osteopathic affiliations on his resume. He served as Hedrick’s chief of staff in 1987, 2000 and 2005, as well as many other positions there. He served on the Board of Directors of Hedrick Medical Center from 1993-2003, and on the board of Grand River Medical System – St. Luke’s Health System from 2003 to 2005. He was the 1993 Missouri Emergency Medical Service Association “Physician of the Year.” He is also affiliated with Wright Memorial Hospital in Trenton and Daviess County Nursing and Rehab.

Dr. Dickinson may have been the last person to do family practice and OB, because that’s very uncommon now. But he still takes care of babies. The hours are not quite as long now. He doesn’t have to go to the hospital every day, so he can have office calls in the morning.

“I need to write a book,” Larry said. “My stories aren’t always sad or funny, but they’re good solid memories of 40 years. One night I parked in a different spot at the hospital, and the staff got concerned. I had put in a long night and had simply disappeared to take an hour’s nap, but I got in trouble for moving my parking spot!”

Dr. Dickinson’s most recent honor is from the MSACOFP, a network of osteopathic family physicians dedicated to providing the finest family medical care in Missouri. The mission of the MSACOFP is to preserve and promote the distinct philosophy and practice of osteopathic family medicine by advancing quality education, leadership and responsible advocacy. The MSACOFP actively works to defend and protect the rights and interests of the osteopathic family physician.

In Dr. Dickinson’s words to the Society:  “I would like to thank my wife and children for their support in allowing me to live this dream. All I’ve ever asked was the love and respect of my patients and my community. Now to be recognized by my peers; all I can say is, I humbly thank you.”

[Portions of this story were taken from an article printed in the Gallatin North Missourian in September, 2006, when Larry and Patty were chosen to be grand marshals in the Daviess County Chautauqua parade.]

Daviess County Couple Records Extraordinary Find of Indian Artifacts

April 15, 2006, started off as an ordinary spring day for Shannon and Amy McCrary of Pattonsburg — but it would quickly take an extraordinary turn as they discovered on a farm-ground hilltop some of the most spectacular blades ever created by Native Americans.

The McCrarys were mushroom hunting.

“We weren’t having any luck finding mushrooms so we switched over to looking for rocks,” said Shannon. “We knew there were some flint pieces scattered around and a campsite in the area.”

They concentrated their search on a hilltop where land had been cleared to build fence and seed with grass for pasture.

Their first clue to a lifetime discovery was made when Amy picked up a polished white blade measuring over five inches long, and then, moments later, another blade, equally huge.

The blades and artifacts from the McCrary collection found in Daviess County. The blades were laid out on black cloth and the photo was taken from a tractor seat. The McCrarys turned over their entire collection to Dr. David A. Easterla. Not a single artifact remains in their home as the collection should remain together.

“We found two points on that day,” said Shannon. “The first piece was not broken. The second piece was broken pretty badly.”

When they got home, they tried to find a match for the blades in their guidebooks. But they couldn’t identify them by the points. The blades were too large.

Amy and Shannon McCrary with their sons, Gunnar, the older boy, and Grady.

Certain there were more blades to be found on the hilltop, the McCrarys called Kenny Mort for advice. They knew Mr. Mort to be an avid collector of Indian artifacts in Daviess County. Kenny told them to make sure they documented their find, took pictures, and to notify a professional archeologist at a college or university.

The McCrarys contacted a university professor who told them they should have the area looked at to make sure it was not a burial ground. Disturbing burial sites, even ancient Indian burial mounds, is illegal in Missouri. The McCrarys had the site examined and it was determined that no bones or teeth were located there. That cleared the way for further excavation.

They returned to the site with hand trowels, tin foil and zip lock bags. They created a grid map to record every piece they picked up.

“We were pretty particular,” said Shannon. “We took exact measurements in case there would be future research.”

They dug in the same spot as before and found five more blades. All of the blades had been broken and placed into a pit. The hole measured about 25 inches around and was eight to 12 inches deep. All the broken pieces could easily be fitted together.

Before this discovery, the McCrarys had found small points, a small axe, some celts — or un-grooved axes, and some scattered chert — a common rock type consisting mostly of quartz crystals.

They were fully aware of the significance of their new discovery.

“Most hunters never find a cache. To find a cache is like striking gold,” said Shannon.

Many of the buried blades had been deliberately broken and buried — what archeologist call “killed”. The Indians of old had not used these blades to hunt elk or scrape hide or clean fish.

“They weren’t used for anything,” said Shannon. “The blades were strictly made and killed for a ceremonial purpose.”

And what was the purpose of the ceremony? Nobody knows for sure. But it is certain the blades had some type of symbolic power and were buried as part of a ritual. Perhaps it was an offering to the gods.

“It’s kind of a mystery,” Shannon said. “There are lots of theories. The blades were fantastic in color. They were beautiful. To go to that much trouble to knap them, only to break them and bury them, something significant had to have happened.”

The Medicine Man or Shaman cache. It includes five tiny picks; two polished disk-shaped stones; one game ball; one bright red jasper stone (and bird stone and burned chunk not shown). All the things found on the hilltops correspond with the age of the blades; it is all fairly close in origin.

Amy and Shannon found a total of 56 blades. About 43 of the blades were called Ouachita. These were the larger blades and the name derives from an Oklahoma Indian tribe.  There were four large unidentified blades with too many pieces lost for identification. There were also 13 unnamed blades.

“The 13 unnamed blades are significant in the artifact world,” said Shannon. “All blades have a name. It’s possible these blades will have our name put on them. That would be fantastic. We could call them ‘The McCrary Cache of Daviess County’ or whatever we wanted.”

The blades varied from five to nine inches in length. The killed blades were made of Burlington chert, which is not native to the area, but found in eastern Missouri, around the Jefferson City/St. Louis area.

Knapping is a technique for making stone tools and weapons by striking flakes from a core with a hard stone. Since no chips or flakes were found in the area, it is believed the blades were knapped somewhere else and brought there by the people.

Some of the blades had heat-treated faces. Heat treating makes chert easier to flake. The edges were often ground and polished.

For the next five months into August, Amy and Shannon would dig in their spare time. They eventually discovered 12 caches or pits.

Ten of the pits were killed. Two of the pits were established at a later time. But all of the artifacts dated from around the same time, plus or minus 50 years.

“In one of the caches we found what appeared to be a grass sack or a basket,” said Shannon. “Maybe they put the blades in the basket before they buried them.”

It is believed the 10 killed caches represent the Hopewell Culture. This is a culture well established to the south in the Kansas City area with over 30 registered sites.

“They would have been old, old; our idea of cavemen,” said Shannon. “The men averaged about five feet tall and lived to be around the age of 30. They had a hard life in a rough climate and amongst predators. If they saw a tornado or felt an earthquake for the first time, it would have been reason enough for a ceremony.”

Kenneth Mort experienced a moment of awe when he dug up this blade at the McCrary cache. This photo is of a large unnamed blade. It measures lengthwise nine inches with the greatest width being 3 1/8 inches.

All 12 of the caches were found on a center hilltop. The caches were from five to 35 feet apart.

“That one hilltop is a natural knoll,” said Shannon. “This is unusual because the Hopewell Indians built their own mound to bury their ceremonial pieces. Maybe they just liked the location. It was alongside a bend in the Grand River at the time. It would have been a beautiful spot 3,000 years ago. The ceremonial mound would have been located away from the main camp. The ceremonial area was off-limits.”

The center hilltop was surrounded by eight more natural knolls that stretched about three-quarters of a mile. These small hilltops faced south toward an old Grand River bed.

On two of the adjacent knoll tops, the McCrarys found a full groove axe, and three different types of arrowheads (Hardin, Goddard and Steuben point). These were all found on the surface.

It was another exciting moment for the McCrarys when they discovered a fire pit on the same center hilltop. The fire pit was eight to 14 inches deep and three feet in diameter. It contained charcoal and red ochre.

Early on in their dig, the McCrarys met David A. Easterla, who studied at the University of Missouri and later received his doctorate a Purdue University. He worked for the National Park Service for 15 summers. He retired from a 51-year career of teaching and is an Emeritus Distinguished University professor. As a researcher, Dr. Easterla believes publication is one of the best ways to advance archeology.

Dr. Easterla visited the McCrary site many times. He sent samples off to carbon date the fire pit and to determine the origin of the points and chert. The age of chert is determined by examining the patina. Patina is a thin layer on the surface of stone that builds over time.

The charcoal carbon dated 3,041 years before present day. This was the Late Archaic period.

It took 11 years for the McCrarys to finish their research. They have turned their whole find over to Dr. Easterla who displays it in his collection.

A broken blade found in a cache containing five Ouachita blades, the longest measuring 7 3/4 inches; one large broken unnamed blade; one unbroken Epps blade measuring 4 9/16 inches long; plus 11 galena pieces. The McCrary Cache photographs are featured in “Who’s Who in Indian Relics, Volume 11” by Steven R. Cooper, available at the Daviess County Library in Gallatin. The volume is 600 pages with thousands of rare and interesting artifacts shown in color and large, easy-to-read layout.

His collection is among the Who’s Who in Indian Relics by Steven R. Cooper, which has been placed in the Daviess County Library as a memorial book by Kenny and Kraig Mort.

“A very special thanks to the Mort family, Kenny, Katherine and Kraig Mort,” said Shannon and Amy.

Dr. Easterla believed that the McCrarys’ find is one of the more profound flint finds ever made in the state of Missouri.

“The author seemed pretty excited to have our caches in his book,” said Shannon.

Shannon now makes presentations on his artifacts to school and clubs.

“Ultimately, the goal was to record the find for future reference, to make sure history was properly noted,” he said. “If someone finds similar artifacts they’ll have a reference to do a comparison. And somebody, someday, will find more. My theory is that 90 percent of artifacts are found by hunters, not archeologists. About 80 percent of the artifacts in this area are still yet to be found.”

The story of the ancient Hopewell tribe has yet to be told.

“The only way we have of knowing our ancestors is through stone,” said Shannon. “They left behind no history books. All we have as evidence of their existence is from the pieces we find today. Where did these people go after leaving Daviess County? Their story continues.”

And the McCrary story continues as well.

“Our son, Gunnar, is 10, and loves to go arrowhead hunting,” said Shannon. “The joke between us is that one of these days he’s going to find something big. He’s looking for that treasure.”

 

USAF Brig. Gen. Jim Sears Returns After Counterterrorism Command Overseas

Air Force Brig. Gen. Jim Sears, who commanded the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing (AEW) at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan for the last 12 months, returned home to the United States on June 4, 2017.

The Gallatin Class of 1987 graduate took a military flight to Qatar, located next to Saudi Arabia and across from Iran in the Persian Gulf, then changed to a commercial flight to Miami to later arrive in San Antonio, TX, late on Sunday. The trip home took 27 hours.

Sears will continue his Air Force career as the Director of Intelligence, Operations, and Nuclear Integration, Headquarters Air Education and Training Command, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, TX.

Brig. Gen. Jim Sears on an F-16 while in counterterrorism duty in Afghanistan (2016)

The 455th AEW is considered as the premier counterterrorism air mission in Afghanistan. The wing’s operations enable the NATO Resolute Support mission to successfully train, advise, and assist the military and security forces of Afghanistan, while restricting and deterring the terrorist threat in the region.

During his time at Bagram Airfield, Brig. Gen. Sears’ leadership enabled 15,800 combat sorties, accumulating to 102,877 combat hours. This resulted in more than 1,369 kinetic strikes and 2,836 enemies killed in action.

These details were reported on the website of the U.S. Air Forces Central Command where Sears thanked his family for their sacrifice the last year. He also thanked the airmen who project airpower every day as he departed from command duty in Afghanistan.

“Commanding in combat truly has been the greatest honor in my career,” said Brig. Gen. Sears.

“There are U.S. and coalition forces that were able to go back and hug their families because airmen were there when they needed them. Because of [455th AEW] airmen like you, there are fewer terrorists in the world today. I am tremendously proud of what you do every day to protect America.

“Thank you for your service and I thank your families for their sacrifices today and every day, so we can successfully conduct counterterrorism operations and enable the train, advise, and assist campaign with our Afghan partners. America is safer because of you.”

Sears’ replacement, Brig. Gen. Craig Baker, took command of the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing during a change of command ceremony June 3, 2017, at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Baker is a command pilot with more than 2,600 flying hours and has commanded at the Squadron and Wing level.

In 2015 USAF Col. James R. Sears, Jr., was nominated for appointment to the grade of brigadier general as announced by U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter. At that time Sears was serving as the director for assignments and air expeditionary force operations, Air Force Personnel Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, TX.

This promotion is one of many during a distinguished military career.

Prior to his current assignment Sears was the 14th Flying Training Wing Commander where he led more than 3,000 Airmen and civilians in conducting Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training for US Air Force and allied officers. The wing possessed the largest fleet of aircraft in the Air Force inventory with 222 aircraft and produced more than one-third of all USAF pilots.

Colonel Sears was commissioned in 1991 as a graduate from the United States Air Force Academy. He has commanded at multiple levels and held staff assignments at Pacific Air Forces and U.S. European Command. He is a command pilot with over 3,200 flight hours and operational experience from C-130 low level special operations to every conventional mission in the F-16.

In 2003 he was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism after successfully leading an 11.3 hour combat search and rescue that resulted in the safe recovery of seven US Marines in a downed helicopter in Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Jim Sears, Jr., with father, Jim Sears, Sr.

Brig. Gen. Sears and his wife, Vikki, have two daughters. His father, Jim Sr., and wife Gina, live in Arizona. The elder Sears owned and operated Pill Box Pharmacy, once located on the east side of the Gallatin business square, for several years.

The following career milestones were current for Brig. Gen. Jim Sears, Jr., as of August, 2014:

EDUCATION

  • 1991 Bachelor of Science in Political Science, United States Air Force Academy 1997 Master of Arts in Human Resource Development, Webster University
  • 1998 Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.
  • 2003 Air Command and Staff College, by correspondence
  • 2005 Air War College, by correspondence
  • 2006 Master of Science in Joint Campaign Planning and Strategy, Joint Advanced Warfighting School, National Defense University
  • 2011 Leadership Development Program, Center for Creative Leadership
  • 2012 Executive Leadership Development Program, Darden School of Business, University of VirginiaASSIGNMENTS
  • August 1991 – September 1992, Student, Undergraduate Pilot Training, Williams AFB, Ariz.
  • October 1992 – January 1993, Student, C-130 Replacement Training Unit, Little Rock AFB, Ark.
  • January 1993 – December 1995, C-130 Aircraft Commander, Special Operations Low-Level II Pilot, and mission scheduler, 40th and 41st Airlift Squadrons, Pope AFB, N.C.
  • December 1995 – March 1998, assistant chief of standardization and evaluation, T-3A Instructor Pilot and Flight Examiner, 557th Flying Training Squadron, United States Air Force Academy, Colo.
  • April 1998 – Jun 1999, Student, F-16 Replacement Training Unit, Luke AFB, Ariz.
  • July 1999 – April 2002, Wing Training and Life Support Officer, Flight Commander, and F-16 Mission Commander, 18th Fighter Squadron, Eielson AFB, Alaska
  • May 2002 – April 2003, Assistant Director of Operations, F-16 Instructor Pilot and Flight Examiner, 35th Fighter Squadron, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea
  • April 2003 – June 2005, Deputy Director, Pacific Air Forces Commander’s Action Group, Hickam AFB, Hawaii
  • July 2005 – June 2006, Senior Developmental Education Student, Joint Advanced Warfighting School, Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
    July 2006 – July 2007, Chief of Wing Safety, 56th Fighter Wing, Luke AFB, Ariz.
  • July 2007 – October 2008, Commander, 61st Fighter Squadron, Luke AFB, Ariz.
  • October 2008 – August 2010, Special Assistant to the SACEUR and Commander, USEUCOM, Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe, Belgium
  • August 2010 – June 2012, Commander, 20th Operations Group, Shaw AFB, S.C.
  • June 2012 – July 2014, Commander, 14th Flying Training Wing, Columbus AFB, Miss.
  • July 2014 – Present, Director of Assignments and AEF Operations, Headquarters Air Force Personnel Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Tex.

FLIGHT INFORMATION
Rating: Command Pilot
Flight hours: More than 3200
Aircraft flown: C-130E, T-3A, F-16 blocks 25-50, and T-38C

MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS:
Legion of Merit with one oak leaf cluster
Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor Device
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters
Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters
Aerial Achievement Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters

EFFECTIVE DATES OF PROMOTION:
Second Lieutenant May 29, 1991
First Lieutenant May 29, 1993
Captain May 29, 1995
Major April 1, 2002
Lieutenant Colonel March 1, 2006
Colonel October 1, 2009

Dr. Lee Rogers, One of America’s Leading Podiatrists, Receives Award in Scotland

Dr. Lee Rogers (GHS Class of 1996) was named this month as one of America’s Most Influential Podiatrists by Podiatry Management magazine for his national leadership, research, and advocacy in prevention of amputations from diabetes.

His notable accomplishments included more than 150 published papers, articles, and book chapters on the subject, and he has delivered more than 400 lectures worldwide.  He currently serves as the medical director of the Amputation Prevention Centers of America, part of a company overseeing 200 wound care and limb salvage centers in 34 states.

Rogers said, “Every 30 seconds, somewhere in the world a limb is lost as a consequence of diabetes.  And after amputation, the prognosis is poor, 70% will die within 5 years.”  Yet, the World Health Organization estimates that 80% of diabetes-related amputations are preventable.

In a seminal paper, “The Right to Bear Legs, an Amendment to Healthcare,” Rogers explained how foot problems make up roughly one-third of the total cost of diabetes in the United States and how simple, inexpensive measures could save the healthcare system billions of dollars.  In 2016, the three national thought-leaders on the diabetic foot, including Rogers, founded a company to aid health insurance companies and governments to improve care and reduce costs related to the diabetic foot.

In 2011 in Paris, France, Rogers led the International Consensus on the Charcot foot, a rare but devastating complication in the diabetic foot frequently leading to amputation.  Rogers’s subsequent manuscript, “The Charcot foot in diabetes,” is now the most frequently referenced paper on the topic.

Dr. Lee Rogers

In June, Lee was selected as a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Glasgow, Scotland for his international work in diabetes complications.  Fewer than 20 American podiatrists have been admitted to the Royal College in its more than 400-year history.

Dr. Rogers has been quoted by the Wall Street Journal, US News and World Report, the Washington Post, and he’s appeared as a guest on ABC’s The Doctors, PBS’s American Medical Journal, and Al Jazeera International’s The Cure.  His work in diabetic amputation prevention has brought him to all 50 states and more than 30 countries.

Dr. Rogers is the son of Madelynn and Steve Adkison, Jameson, and the late Bob Rogers. His mother once owned and operated Sandman Motel in Gallatin; Bob Rogers owned and operated Skakey’s Place restaurant and also served as Gallatin mayor.

 

Extraordinary find of Indian artifacts

April 15, 2006, started off as an ordinary spring day for Shannon and Amy McCrary of Pattonsburg — but it would quickly take an extraordinary turn as they discovered on a farm-ground hilltop some of the most spectacular blades ever created by Native Americans.

The McCrarys were mushroom hunting.

“We weren’t having any luck finding mushrooms so we switched over to looking for rocks,” said Shannon. “We knew there were some flint pieces scattered around and a campsite in the area.”

They concentrated their search on a hilltop where land had been cleared to build fence and seed with grass for pasture.

Their first clue to a lifetime discovery was made when Amy picked up a polished white blade measuring over five inches long, and then, moments later, another blade, equally huge.

“We found two points on that day,” said Shannon. “The first piece was not broken. The second piece was broken pretty badly.”

When they got home, they tried to find a match for the blades in their guidebooks. But they couldn’t identify them by the points. The blades were too large.

Certain there were more blades to be found on the hilltop, the McCrarys called Kenny Mort for advice. They knew Mr. Mort to be an avid collector of Indian artifacts in Daviess County. Kenny told them to make sure they documented their find, took pictures, and to notify a professional archeologist at a college or university.

The McCrarys contacted a university professor who told them they should have the area looked at to make sure it was not a burial ground. Disturbing burial sites, even ancient Indian burial mounds, is illegal in Missouri. The McCrarys had the site examined and it was determined that no bones or teeth were located there. That cleared the way for further excavation.

They returned to the site with hand trowels, tin foil and zip lock bags. They created a grid map to record every piece they picked up.

“We were pretty particular,” said Shannon. “We took exact measurements in case there would be future research.”

They dug in the same spot as before and found five more blades. All of the blades had been broken and placed into a pit. The hole measured about 25 inches around and was eight to 12 inches deep. All the broken pieces could easily be fitted together.

Before this discovery, the McCrarys had found small points, a small axe, some celts — or un-grooved axes, and some scattered chert — a common rock type consisting mostly of quartz crystals.

They were fully aware of the significance of their new discovery.

“Most hunters never find a cache. To find a cache is like striking gold,” said Shannon.

Many of the buried blades had been deliberately broken and buried — what archeologist call “killed”. The Indians of old had not used these blades to hunt elk or scrape hide or clean fish.

“They weren’t used for anything,” said Shannon. “The blades were strictly made and killed for a ceremonial purpose.”

And what was the purpose of the ceremony? Nobody knows for sure. But it is certain the blades had some type of symbolic power and were buried as part of a ritual. Perhaps it was an offering to the gods.

“It’s kind of a mystery,” Shannon said. “There are lots of theories. The blades were fantastic in color. They were beautiful. To go to that much trouble to knap them, only to break them and bury them, something significant had to have happened.”

Amy and Shannon found a total of 56 blades. About 43 of the blades were called Ouachita. These were the larger blades and the name derives from an Oklahoma Indian tribe.  There were four large unidentified blades with too many pieces lost for identification. There were also 13 unnamed blades.

“The 13 unnamed blades are significant in the artifact world,” said Shannon. “All blades have a name. It’s possible these blades will have our name put on them. That would be fantastic. We could call them ‘The McCrary Cache of Daviess County’ or whatever we wanted.”

The blades varied from five to nine inches in length. The killed blades were made of Burlington chert, which is not native to the area, but found in eastern Missouri, around the Jefferson City/St. Louis area.

Knapping is a technique for making stone tools and weapons by striking flakes from a core with a hard stone. Since no chips or flakes were found in the area, it is believed the blades were knapped somewhere else and brought there by the people.

Some of the blades had heat-treated faces. Heat treating makes chert easier to flake. The edges were often ground and polished.

For the next five months into August, Amy and Shannon would dig in their spare time. They eventually discovered 12 caches or pits.

Ten of the pits were killed. Two of the pits were established at a later time. But all of the artifacts dated from around the same time, plus or minus 50 years.

“In one of the caches we found what appeared to be a grass sack or a basket,” said Shannon. “Maybe they put the blades in the basket before they buried them.”

It is believed the 10 killed caches represent the Hopewell Culture. This is a culture well established to the south in the Kansas City area with over 30 registered sites.

“They would have been old, old; our idea of cavemen,” said Shannon. “The men averaged about five feet tall and lived to be around the age of 30. They had a hard life in a rough climate and amongst predators. If they saw a tornado or felt an earthquake for the first time, it would have been reason enough for a ceremony.”

All 12 of the caches were found on a center hilltop. The caches were from five to 35 feet apart.

“That one hilltop is a natural knoll,” said Shannon. “This is unusual because the Hopewell Indians built their own mound to bury their ceremonial pieces. Maybe they just liked the location. It was alongside a bend in the Grand River at the time. It would have been a beautiful spot 3,000 years ago. The ceremonial mound would have been located away from the main camp. The ceremonial area was off-limits.”

The center hilltop was surrounded by eight more natural knolls that stretched about three-quarters of a mile. These small hilltops faced south toward an old Grand River bed.

On two of the adjacent knoll tops, the McCrarys found a full groove axe, and three different types of arrowheads (Hardin, Goddard and Steuben point). These were all found on the surface.

It was another exciting moment for the McCrarys when they discovered a fire pit on the same center hilltop. The fire pit was eight to 14 inches deep and three feet in diameter. It contained charcoal and red ochre.

Early on in their dig, the McCrarys met David A. Easterla, who studied at the University of Missouri and later received his doctorate a Purdue University. He worked for the National Park Service for 15 summers. He retired from a 51-year career of teaching and is an Emeritus Distinguished University professor. As a researcher, Dr. Easterla believes publication is one of the best ways to advance archeology.

Dr. Easterla visited the McCrary site many times. He sent samples off to carbon date the fire pit and to determine the origin of the points and chert. The age of chert is determined by examining the patina. Patina is a thin layer on the surface of stone that builds over time.

The charcoal carbon dated 3,041 years before present day. This was the Late Archaic period.

It took 11 years for the McCrarys to finish their research. They have turned their whole find over to Dr. Easterla who displays it in his collection.

His collection is among the Who’s Who in Indian Relics by Steven R. Cooper, which has been placed in the Daviess County Library as a memorial book by Kenny and Kraig Mort.

“A very special thanks to the Mort family, Kenny, Katherine and Kraig Mort,” said Shannon and Amy.

Dr. Easterla believed that the McCrarys’ find is one of the more profound flint finds ever made in the state of Missouri.

“The author seemed pretty excited to have our caches in his book,” said Shannon.

Shannon now makes presentations on his artifacts to school and clubs.

“Ultimately, the goal was to record the find for future reference, to make sure history was properly noted,” he said. “If someone finds similar artifacts they’ll have a reference to do a comparison. And somebody, someday, will find more. My theory is that 90 percent of artifacts are found by hunters, not archeologists. About 80 percent of the artifacts in this area are still yet to be found.”

The story of the ancient Hopewell tribe has yet to be told.

“The only way we have of knowing our ancestors is through stone,” said Shannon. “They left behind no history books. All we have as evidence of their existence is from the pieces we find today. Where did these people go after leaving Daviess County? Their story continues.”

And the McCrary story continues as well.

“Our son, Gunnar, is 10, and loves to go arrowhead hunting,” said Shannon. “The joke between us is that one of these days he’s going to find something big. He’s looking for that treasure.”

— written by T.L. Huffman, Gallatin North Missourian,
published April 12, 2017; Vol. 152, No. 46

Alexander M. Dockery — A Chillicothe perspective

Alexander M. Dockery is buried beneath a red marble obelisk that towers 15 feet or so into the air at Edgewood Cemetery in Chillicothe. But Gallatin claims Dockery as a native son because he was born in a log cabin on Honey Creek, five miles south of Gallatin on Feb. 11, 1845. He moved back to Gallatin when he was almost 30 years old and made a fortune from founding and serving as cashier of Farmer’s Exchange Bank in Gallatin.

Dockery moved around frequently as a child because his father, Willis E. Dockery, was an itinerant Methodist Episcopal preacher. His mother, Sarah Ellen Dockery, weary of the frequent moves, finally insisted that Willis buy the family a permanent home in Chillicothe. Many of Dockery’s boyhood years were spent in Chillicothe.

Dockery graduated from St. Louis Medical College in 1865, just a month before the official end of the Civil War. He practiced for three years in Linneus. In 1868, he moved his practice to Chillicothe.

On April 14, 1869, he married Mary Bird, daughter of Chillicothe banker Greenup Bird and they made their home in Chillicothe. As a young doctor, Dockery advanced himself quickly. He served as Livingston County physician from 1870 to 1874, as president of the Chillicothe Board of Education from 1871 to 1873, and in 1972 was selected as a member of the board of curators for the University of Missouri.

In March, 1874, at the age of 29, Dockery went into a business partnership with Chillicothe druggist Thomas Bootin Yates. Both men moved their families to Gallatin, and they bought the private banking house of Armstrong & Thompson, changing the name to Farmer’s Exchange Bank. Yates served as president and Dockery as cashier. The bank prospered until late into the 20th century. Charlie Litton served on the bank board for many years.

Dockery served as a Gallatin city councilman from 1879 to 1883, when he was made mayor. That same year he was elected to Congress for this district. He served as U.S. representative until 1899, a not-too-shabby 16 years. In 1901, he was elected as Missouri governor and served one term. Beginning in 1913, he served six years as an assistant U.S. postmaster for this area.

— written in 2002 by Dave Kinnamon,
staff writer for the Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune

Mormon Troubles in Missouri

Missouri Historical Review
July, 1910 Vol. IV. No. 4; pages 238-250
by Heman C. Smith

The Latter Day Saints began settling in and around Independence, Missouri, in 1831. Their customs, and their religious and political attitude were not in harmony with the feelings and prejudices of their neighbors. This resulted in bitterness and opposition which in time led to friction and conflict. The Missourians deciding that the Saints were not desirable citizens determined to rid themselves of their presence by taking the law in their own hands and excluding them by force.

A mass meeting was held in Independence in April, 1833, to consult upon a plan to remove or destroy this people. This meeting was attended by about three hundred men, and the company in consequence of drinking too freely broke up in a row among themselves. The animosity still continued however and on July 18, 1833, the following document was put in circulation:

“We the undersigned, citizens of Jackson county, believing that an important crisis is at hand as regards our civil society, in consequence of a pretended religious sect of people that have settled and are still settling in our county, styling themselves Mormons, and intending as we do to rid our society “peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must,” and believing as we do that the arm of the civil law does not afford us a guarantee or at least a sufficient one against the evils which are now inflicted upon us, and seem to be increasing by the said religious sect, deem it expedient, and of the highest importance, to form ourselves into a company for the better and easier accomplishment of our purpose, a purpose which we deem it almost superfluous to say, is justified as well by the law of nature, as by the law of self-preservation.

“It is more than two years since the first of these fanatics or knaves (for one or the other they undoubtedly are) made their first appearance among us, and pretending as they did and now do to hold personal communication and converse face to face with the most High God, to receive communications and relevations direct from heaven; to heal the sick by laying on hands; and, in short, to perform all the wonder-working miracles wrought by the inspired apostles and prophets of old.

”We believed them deluded fanatics or weak and designing knaves, and that they and their pretensions would soon pass away; but in this we were deceived. The arts of a few designing leaders amongst them have thus far succeeded in holding them together as a society, and since the arrival of the first of them they have been daily increasing in numbers, and if they had been respectable citizens in society, and thus deluded they would have been entitled to our pity rather than to our contempt and hatred; but from their appearance, from their manners, and from their conduct, since their coming among us, we have every reason to fear that with but a few exceptions, they were of the very dregs of that society from which they came; lazy, idle, and vicious. This we conceive is not idle assertion, but a fact susceptible of proof, for with these few exceptions above named they brought into our country little or no property with them, and left less behind them, and we infer that those only yoked themselves to the Mormon car who had nothing earthly or heavenly to lose by the change; and we fear that if some of the leaders amongst them had paid the forfeit due to crime, instead of being chosen embassadors of the most high, they would have been inmates of solitary cells. But their conduct here stamps their characters in their true colors. More than a year since it was ascertained that they had been tampering with our slaves and endeavoring to sow dissensions and raise seditions amongst them. Of this their Mormon leaders were informed and they said they would deal with any of their members who should again in like case offend. But how specious are appearances. In a late number of the Star, published in Independence by the leaders of the sect, there is an article inciting free negroes and mulattoes from other states to become Mormons, and remove and settle among us. This exhibits them in still more odious colors. It manifests a desire on the part of their society to inflict on our society an injury that they know would be to us insupportable, and one of the surest means of driving us from the county, for it would require none of the supernatural gifts that they pretend to, to see that the introduction of such a caste amongst us would corrupt our blacks and instigate them to bloodshed.

They openly blaspheme the most High God and cast contempt on his holy religion by pretending to receive revelations direct from heaven, by pretending to speak unknown tongues by direct inspiration, and by diverse pretenses derogatory of God and religion, and to the utter subversion of human reason.

They declare openly that their God hath given them this county of land, and that sooner or later they must and will have the possession of our lands for an inheritance, and in fine they have conducted themselves on many other occasions in such a manner that we belive it a duty we owe ourselves, to our wives and children, to the cause of public morals, to remove them from among us, as we are not prepared to give up our pleasant places and goodly possessions to them, or to receive into the bosom of our families as fit companions for our wives and daughters the degraded and corrupted free negroes and mulattoes that are now invited to settle among us.

Under such a state of things even our beautiful county would cease to be a desirable residence ,and our situation intolerable! We, therefore, agree, that after timely warning and receiving an adequate compensation for what little property they can not take with them, they refuse to leave us in peace, as they found us, we agree to use such means as may be sufficient to remove them, and to that end we each pledge to each other our bodily powers, our lives, fortunes, and sacred honors.

We will meet at the court house at the town of Independence, on Saturday next, the 20th inst., to consult ulterior movements.” (1)

This was signed by several hundred names among whom were the following: Lewis Franklin, Jailer; Samuel C. Owens. County Clerk; Russell Hicks, Deputy Clerk; R. W. Cummins. Indian Agent; Jones H. Flourney, Post Master; S. D. Lucas, Colonel and Judge of the Court; Henry Childs, Attorney at law; N. K. Olmstead, M. D.; John Smith, J. P.; Samuel Weston, J. P.; William Brown, Constable; Abner F. Staples, Captain; Thomas Pitcher, Deputy Constable; Moses G. Wilson. Thomas Wilson, merchants.

It is impossible to ascertain at this late date just the proportion of truth and falsehood of which this document is composed, but one part of it is easily weighed when compared with the article published in the Evening and Morning Star to which reference is made in the foregoing document. The article as copied from the Star reads as follows:

“To prevent any misunderstanding among the churches abroad, respecting free people of color, who may think of coming to the western boundaries of Missouri, as members of the church, we quote the following clauses from the laws of Missouri:

Section 4. Be it further enacted, that hereafter no free negro or mullato, other than a citizen of some one of the United States, shall come into or settle in this State under any pretext whatever; and upon complaint made to any justice of the peace that such person is in his county, contrary to the provisions of this section, if it shall appear that such person is a free negro or mulatto, and that he hath come into this state after the passage of this act, and such person shall not produce a certificate, attested by the seal of some court of record in some one of the United States, evidencing that he is a citizen of such State, the justice shall command him forthwith to depart from this state; and in case such negro or mulatto shall not depart from the State within thirty days after being commanded so to do as aforesaid, any justice of the peace, upon complaint thereof to him made, may cause such person to be brought before him and may commit him to the common goal of the county in which he may be found, until the next term of the Circuit Court to be held in such County. And the said court shall cause such person to be brought before them and examine into the cause of commitment; and if it shall appear that such person came into the State contrary to the provisions of this act, and continued therein after being commanded to depart as aforesaid, such court may sentence such person to receive ten lashes on his or her bare back, and order him to depart from the State; and if he or she shall not depart, the same proceedings shall be had and punishment inflicted, as often as may be necessary, until such person shall depart the State.

Section 5. Be it further enacted, that if any person shall, after the taking effect of this act, bring into this state any free negro or mulatto, not having in his possession a certificate of citizenship as required by this act (he or she) shall forfeit and pay, for every person so brought, the sum of five hundred dollars, to be recovered by action of debt in the name of the State, to the use of the University, in any court having competent jurisdiction; in which action the defendant may be held to bail of right and without affidavit; and it shall be the duty of the Attorney General or Circuit Attorney of the district in which any person so offending may be found, immediately upon  information given of such offenses, to commence and prosecute an action as aforesaid.”

Slaves are real estate in this and other States, and wisdom would dictate great care among the branches of the Church of Christ, on this subject. So long as we have no special rule in the church, as to people of color, let prudence guide; and while they, as well as we, are in the hands of a merciful God we say, shun every appearance of evil.

While on the subject of law it may not be amiss to quote some of the Constitution of Missouri. It shows a liberality of opinion of the great men of the West, and will vie with that of any other State. It is good; it is just, and it is the citizens right.

4. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences, that no man can be compelled to erect, support, or attend any place of worship, or to maintain any minister of the gospel or teacher of religion; that no human authority can control or interfere with the rights of conscience; that no person can ever be hurt, molested, or restrained in his religious professions or sentiments, if he do not disturb others in their religious worship.

  1. That no person, on account of his religious opinions can be rendered ineligible to any office of trust or profit under this State; that no preference can ever be given by law to any sect or mode of worship; and that no religious corporation can ever be established in this State.” (2)

This mob, for they can be considered in no other light, met as per declaration in this signed document, Saturday, July 20. 1833, and sent a committee consisting of Robert Johnson, James Campbell, Moses Wilson, Joel F. Childs, Richard Bristoe, Abner F. Staples Gan Johnson, Lewis Franklin, Russell Hicks, S. D. Lucas, Thomas Wilson, James M. Hunter, and Richard Simpson, to Edward Partridge, A. S. Gilbert, John Carroll. Isaac Morley, John Whitmer and William W. Phelps leading members of the church demanding the immediate suspension of the Evening and Morning Star and that the people of the church should forthwith remove from the country. The representatives of the church asked for three months in which to consider. This was denied. They then asked for ten days and were informed they could have but fifteen minutes. Not receiving the demanded pledge in the specified time the mob proceeded to raze to the ground the printing office and the dwelling of W. W. Phelps. Mrs. Phelps with her children, including a sick infant, were thrown into the street. The press was broken, the type pied, etc. The mob then proceeded to demolish the storehouse and destroy the goods of Gilbert, Whitney and Company. Upon Mr. Gilbert assuring them that the goods should be packed by the 23rd inst. they ceased the destruction of property and proceeded to do personal violence. They took Edward Partridge, Bishop of the church, and a Mr. Charles Allen and stripped and tarred and feathered them in the presence of the crowd before the courthouse. In a petition for redress subsequently addressed to Governor Daniel Dunklin the Saints stated their case in the following language:

“Now, therefore, for ourselves, as members of the church we declare, with the exception of poverty, which has not yet become a crime, by the laws of the land, that the crimes charged against us (so far as we are acquainted) contained in the documents above written, and those in the proceedings of the mob, as published in the Western Monitor of August 2, are not true. In relation to inviting free people of color to emigrate to this section of country, and other matters relative to our society, see the 109th, 10th and 11th pages of the Evening and Morning Star, and the Extra accompanying the same, dated July 16, which are annexed to this petition. Our situation is a critical one; we are located upon the western limits of the state, and of the United States — where desperadoes can commit outrages, and even murder, and escape, in a few minutes, beyond the reach of process; where the most abandoned of all classes from almost every State may too often pass to the Mexican states or to the more remote regions of the Rocky Mountain to escape the grasp of justice; where numerous tribes of Indians, located by the General government amid the corrupting influence of midday mobs might massacre our defenseless women and children with impunity.

Influenced by the precepts of our beloved Saviour, when we have been smitten on the one cheek we have turned the other also; when we have been sued at the law and our coat been taken, we have given them our cloak also; when they have compelled us to go with them a mile we have gone with them twain. We have bourne the above outrages without murmuring, but we can not patiently bear them any longer; according to the laws of God and man we have bourne enough. Believing with all honorable men, that whenever that fatal hour shall arrive that the poorest citizen’s property, person, or rights and privileges, shall be trampled upon by a lawless mob with impunity, that moment a dagger is plunged into the heart of the constitution, and the Union must tremble! Assuring ourselves that no republican will suffer the liberty of the press, the freedom of speech, and the liberty of conscience to be silenced by a mob, without raising a helping hand, to save his country from disgrace, we solicit assistance to obtain our rights, holding ourselves amenable to the laws of our country whenever we transgress them.

Knowing as we do that the threats of this mob, in most cases have been put into execution; and knowing also, that every officer, civil and military, with a few exceptions, has pledged his life and honor to force us from the county, dead or alive; and believing that civil process can not be served without the aid of the Executive; and not wishing to have the blood of our defenseless women and children to stain the land which has been once stained by the blood of our fathers to purchase our liberty, we appeal to the Governor for aid; asking him by express proclamation or otherwise to raise a sufficient number of troops, who with us may be empowered to defend our rights, that we may sue for damages in the loss of property — for abuse, for defamation, as to ourselves, and if advisable try for treason against the government; that the law of the land may not be defied or nullified, but peace restored to our country. And we will every pray.” (3)

The mob assembled again on the 23rd when under duress William W. Phelps, Oliver Cowdery, William E. McClellan, Edward Partridge, Lyman Wight, Simeon Carter, Peter Whitmer, John Whitmer, and Harvey Whitlock signed an agreement to leave the county with their families before the first day of January 1834, and to use their influence to induce all their brethren to remove as soon as possible one-half before the first of January, and the other half by the first day of April, 1834.

Without waiting for the fulfillment of this pledge the mob in October, 1833, again commenced perpetrating acts of personal violence and destruction of property. This resulted in a clash at arms near the Blue River west of Independence, about sundown November 4, 1833. Hugh L. Brazelle and Thomas Linville of the mob were left dead on the ground. Several were wounded on each side, one a Mr. Barber of the church party, died the next day.

These events naturally intensified the feeling of hostility and the weeks that followed were filled with deeds of horror resulting in the banishment of the Saints who took refuge in adjoining counties, principally in Clay. Efforts were made by the Saints to be re-instated or re-imbursed. Appeals were made to the Governor and to the courts but no substantial results were realized. Lilburn W. Boggs was at this time Lieut. Governor of Missouri; and for a time the Saints reposed confidence in him and looked to him for protection, but finally became convinced that he was aiding and abetting their enemies under color of using his influence to call out the militia which was composed largely of their persecutors. From the militia they received no relief but on the contrary it was used to render their sufferings more intolerable.

To follow the history of this people through the incidents of Clay, Caldwell, Daviess and adjoining counties would take too much space for the limits of this article. Passing on to 1838 at which time, the main body of the church was in Caldwell county, and had established the town of Far West we note another scene of hostility confronted the church and conflicting accusations of crime, and lawlessness filled upper Missouri with anxiety. Conflict seemed inevitable. L.W. Boggs having in the meantime been elected Governor arrayed himself with the anti-church faction, and gave orders to treat the, Mormons as public enemies. It was at this time he issued his famous exterminating order to General John B. Clark, which reads as follows:

“Headquarters Militia, City of Jefferson, Oct. 27, 1838.

Sir: — Since the order of the morning to you, directing you to cause four hundred mounted men to be raised within your division, I have received by Amos Rees, Esq., and Wiley E. Williams, Esq., one of my aids information of the most appalling character which changes the whole face of things, and places the Mormons in the attitude of open and avowed defiance of the laws, and of having made open war upon the people of this State. Your orders are therefore, to hasten your operations and endeavor to reach Richmond, in Ray county, with all possible speed. The Mormons must be treated as enemies and must be exterminated or driven from the State if necessary, for the public good. Their outrages are beyond all description. If you can increase your force you are authorized to do so, to any extent you may think necessary. I have just issued orders to Major-General Wallock, of Marion County, to raise five hundred men, and to march them to the northern part of Daviess, and there to unite with you. Doniphan, of Clay, who has been ordered with five hundred to proceed to the same point, for the purpose of intercepting the retreat of the Mormons to the north. They have been directed to communicate with you by express; you can also communicate with them if you find it necessary. Instead, therefore, of proceeding, as at first directed, to reinstate the citizens of Daviess in their homes, you will proceed immediately to Richmond, and there operate against the Mormons. Brigadier General Parks of Ray, has been ordered to have four hundred men of his brigade in readiness to join you at Richmond. The whole force Will be placed under your command. (4)

1854, from manuscript history of Joseph Smith written by himself.

L.W. BOGGS,
Governor and Commander in Chief.

To General Clark.

General A. W. Doniphan states that orders to the same effect were issued to General D. R. Atchison, who was in command of the militia in the vicinity of Far West, but he revolted and withdrew from the military force, declaring that he would be HO party to the enforcement of such inhuman commands. This left General Samuel D. Lucas in command until the arrival of General Clark. Far West prepared for defense and war was eminent. On October 30, 1838, inspired by the exterminating order of the Governor a detachment of men under the command of Captains Nehemiah Comstock, William 0. Jennings and William Gee fell upon a defenseless settlement of the Saints at Haun ‘s Mills and murdered in cold blood the entire settlement of men, women and children very few escaping. On the same day the troops approached Far West and encamped one mile from the town.

The next day General Lucas induced several of the leading men to come into his camp for the purpose of consultation, but when they arrived they were made prisoners of war without an attempt at consultation. These were Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Parley P. Pratt, Lyman Wight, and George W. Robinson. The next day Hyrum Smith and Amasa Lyman were added to the number of prisoners. Though these men with the exception of Colonel Wight were not military men a courtmartial was called and all sentenced to be shot. Lucas issued the following urder to carry the decree into effect:

“Brigadier-General Doniphan; Sir: You will take Joseph Smith and other prisoners into the public square of Far West, and shoot them at nine o ‘clock tomorrow morning.

“SAMUEL D. LUCAS,
“Major-General Commanding.”

And he received the following reply:

To Samuel D. Lucas, Major-General Commanding:

“It is cold-blooded murder. I will not obey your order. My brigade shall march for Liberty tomorrow morning, at eight o’clock; and if you execute those men, I will hold you responsible before an earthly tribunal, so help me God!

A. W. DONIPHAN,
Brigadier-General

This so disconcerted General Lucas that the sentence was not executed. The prisoners were kept by the militia for some time then turned over to the civil courts. After being imprisoned for several months under one pretext or another they were permitted to escape with the connivance of the officers, and no effort made to apprehend them on charges then pending.

The Saints at Far West were disarmed, their property confiscated, and they were banished from the State.

On May 6, 1842, ex-Governor Boggs was assaulted by an unknown would-be assassin in his home at Independence, Missouri, and severely wounded. Mr. Orrin P. Rockwell, a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints being in the town, suspicion at once attached to him. It was also suspected that Joseph Smith had sent him there for the purpose.

Based upon the affidavit of L. W. Boggs, Governor Thomas Reynolds made requisition on Governor Garlin, of Illinois, for the surrender of Joseph Smith charged with being accessor before the act. Several attempts were made to get possession of the person of Joseph Smith both by kidnapping and by civil process, all proving abortive. Joseph Smith finally went to Springfield, Illinois, and surrendered. The examination came on in December term of court before the Honorable Nathaniel Pope, after an extended examination the court handed down his decision in the following language:

“The decision of the court is that the prisoner be discharged ; and I wish it entered upon the records in such a way that Mr. Smith be no more troubled about this matter.” (6)

O.P. Rockwell was arrested in Independence, and probably had a preliminary examination, and was held awaiting the action of the Grand Jury. He escaped jail and was again apprehended. The evidence was doubtless presented to the Grand Jury and it failed to find sufficient evidence to indict him for assaulting ex-Governor Boggs, for on the third day of the August term of Circuit Court, 1843, Judge John H. Ryland presiding, the Grand Jury returned the following:

“A true bill State of Missouri against Orrin P. Rockwell, “Indictment, escaping from jail.” Court Record E, p. 166. This case came on for trial the same day. Defendant plead not guilty. Court appointed Honorable A. W. Doniphan to defend prisoner; case continued. Ibid p. 170.

Case called again sixth day of same term, defendant filed petition for change of venue, setting forth that an impartial trial can not be obtained in this circuit on account of prejudice of people.

It was ordered by the court that the case be sent to the County of Clay, 5th Judicial District, and the sheriff was ordered to deliver the body of the defendant to the sheriff or jailor of Clay county on Monday, August 21, 1843. Ibid 196-8.

William Patterson, John McCoy, Thomas Reynolds Ammon E. Crenshaw and R. C. Kennedy were each put under bonds of two hundred dollars to appear at Liberty, Missouri, on the first day of the August term of the 5th Judicial District to testify in this cause in behalf of the state. The records at Liberty disclose the following:

August 31, 1843, the case was called and Orin P. Rockwell by order of the court remanded back to the custody of the sheriff or jailer of Jackson county. Record Book G, No. 4, p. 228.

On November 24, a special term of Circuit Court was ordered to convene on December 11th for the purpose of trying this case. Ibid page 236.

The same page of the record shows that court convened as per order, the Honorable Austin A. King, presiding.

The prisoner plead not guilty in the manner and form charged, a jury was impaneled consisting of Samuel Rungo, Thomas McChives,Johnson Williams, Thomas Gardner, Fielding Buchanan, Richard Neely, James Burnaugh, Richard Brizeford, J. A. Futglin J. E. Whitsell, J. I. Atkins and Benjamin Gragg. After careful investigation the jury returned a verdict of “guilty”, and assessed the punishment at “Five minutes confinement in the County Jail.” Then the august Judge, the Honorable Austin A. King, Judge of the 5th Judicial Circuit, announced the dread sentence assessed by the jury, and so far as the records disclose the curtain fell. The presumption is that he served his sentence.

This is all there is of the often repeated story, reviewed by Mr. William M. Boggs in January number of Historical Review. When it is considered that all the machinery of the courts was in the hands of enemies of the church this whole affair about 0. P. Rockwell attempting to murder ex-Governor Boggs and Joseph Smith being accessory before the fact, partakes of the nature of a huge joke.

HEMAN C. SMITH.

————————————

  1. Evening and Morning Star, Kirkland, Ohio, December, 1833, pp. 227-228.
  2. Evening and Morning Star, Independence, Missouri, July* 1833, pp. 218-219.
  3. Evening and Morning Star, Kirkland, Ohio, December, 1833, p.
  4. Milinial Star, Liverpool, England, Vol. 16, p. 446, July 16,
  5. History of Caldwell and Livingston counties, p. 137.
  6. Times and Seasons, Nauvoo, Illinois, Jan. 2,1843, Vol. 4, p. 60.

Maj. Samuel P. Cox — A County Legend

The adventures of Major S.P. Cox (1828-1913) read like a history of our nation including the westward movement, the Mexican War, the West’s early Indian wars, the California gold rush, the Civil War, and the exploits the notorious outlaws Frank & Jesse James.

The adventures of Major S.P. Cox (1828-1913) read like a history of our nation including the westward movement, the Mexican War, the West’s early Indian wars, the California gold rush, the Civil War, and the exploits the notorious outlaws Frank & Jesse James.

Samuel Cox of Gallatin, MO

Samuel Cox was born on Dec. 16, 1828, at Williamsburg in Whitley County, KY. He moved to Daviess County, MO, in 1839 with his father, Franklin Cox. The family settled in the southeastern part of the county near the old Ames Saw Mill and Trosper Lake.

Enlisting in the U.S. Army at age 19, Cox was among the Missouri volunteers ordered to help develop the Oregon Trail and Mormon Trail and to protect the Santa Fe Trail. In 1848 he helped complete Fort Kearney, located on the south side of the Platte River in what later became Nebraska.

Cox settled in Gallatin, MO, in 1850, married and worked four years in the mercantile business. Then, with oxen and cattle, he moved his family to Oroville, CA, to work as a teamster for gold diggers. The family prospered but yearned to return to Missouri. So, they sold out and went to San Francisco where they were attracted to a steam ship voyage, a route with Baltimore as a destination by way of Nicaraugua. The family survived a shipwreck near Key West, FL.

In 1859 Cox drew national newspaper publicity for an extraordinary feat. While delivering Army dispatches, Cox covered over 1200 miles in 30 days by mule! His trek from Salt Lake City, Utah, to Nebraska City, NE, included one leg of 125 miles without a stop to avoid hostile Sioux warriors led by Red Cloud. Cox’s feat compares favorably against horseback rides in relay — and he was a lone rider without companions or support, other than two good mules.

Cox was among the first to publicly declare for the Union soon after the start of the Civil War in 1861. He promptly recruited and commanded “Cox’s Battalion.” He fought guerrillas at Kirksville (Adair County), Lee’s Ford (Chariton County), and Union Mills (Platte County).

Daviess County Savings Association, located on the southwest corner of the Gallatin business square

After the war, the infamous James Gang robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association occurred on Dec. 7, 1869. The murder of cashier John Sheets vaulted Frank and Jesse James onto the wanted list for the very first time and marked the beginning of an assault against law and order of international interest. Samuel P. Cox was a central player in the outlaws’ early plot.

Inscription on the ceremonial saber presented to Lt. Col. Samuel P. Cox of St. Joseph reads: “Presented to Lt. Col. Samuel P. Cox, 33 Inf. Missouri militia, from the Citizens of Gallatin, Mo., Dec. 25, 1864”
Daviess County Historical Society acquired a ceremonial saber and pistol in May, 1992. The saber was given in gratitude for his wartime services. The pistol is a Remington .44 six-shot U.S. Army revolver, authentic and thought to be used by Cox although not of a quality to interest gun collectors. The Remington is from an estimated quantity of 132,000 issued between 1803 and 1875, and was considered the stiffest competitor to Colt’s Model 1860 Army revolver. A leather holster complete with brass Army buckle was also acquired. (Cox obituary, published August, 1913, in the Gallatin Democrat)

Union Major Samuel P. Cox gained widespread fame when he was credited with the killing of William “Bloody Bill” Anderson on Oct. 27, 1864, near Richmond, MO. The City of St. Joseph presented Cox with a ceremonial sword for killing the notorious guerrilla chief (accused of killing 54 Union men). Few knew Major Cox was actually protecting a bugler under his command, Adolph Vogel, who in all probability pulled the trigger that sent Bloody Bill to his death. Vogel was a young family man, mindful of revenge sworn by Jesse James and other guerrillas against whomever killed their leader. So, as commanding officer, Major Cox assumed that personal risk for years after the Civil War …a risk that became bloody reality when the James brothers later robbed the savings association in Gallatin.

Artist’s concept of the shooting of Capt. John Sheets

Jesse James swore he would avenge the death of Wm. “Bloody Bill” Anderson whenever he next saw Samuel P. Cox. Thus, during the 1869 robbery of the Daviess County Savings Association, John W. Sheets was an unfortunate victim of circumstance when Jesse James mistook him for Samuel Cox. A horse used during the robbery and murder linked Jesse James to the crime. The Governor of Missouri soon offered a bounty for the capture of the outlaw. This was the first time Jesse James was publicly wanted by the law, the start of a 12-year crime spree.

Ironically, a James Gang member, Clelland Miller, was a friend to Cox and actually saved the Major’s life during the Civil War.

The case can be made for Samuel Cox to top our list of military leaders from Daviess County. His escapades and achievements need no embellishment.

In 1862 Major Cox served the county as recorder and circuit clerk. In 1874 he was collector for Union Township.

If Cox wasn’t particularly interested in business, he certainly knew how to pick business partners. Local records show a mercantile business at the southeast corner of the Gallatin square called Ballinger, Cox & Kemper. It operated a little more than a year, long enough for the birth of William T. Kemper. The Kemper family fortune became one of Kansas City’s largest. The family controls one of Missouri’s largest financial institutions, United Missouri Bank of Kansas City, and the Kemper name is lavished on Kansas City’s civic arena. By the way, the real estate for the business in Gallatin was purchased by the three partners for $1,500. Evidently, business was good. Partner John Ballinger later purchased Kemper’s interest for $1,250.

Samuel P. Cox died on Aug. 21, 1913, a man who lived history in legendary fashion. He is buried at Brown Cemetery, on the north side of Gallatin.

— written by Darryl Wilkinson, Gallatin North Missourian editor & publisher

Dick Paul retires as USAF 2-Star General

Richard R. Paul retired from the USAF on June 1, 2000, as a Major General in command of Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He directed the Air Force’s $1.4 billion science and technology program which was executed by more than 6,000 people in the laboratory’s component technology directorates and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Richard R. Paul (GHS Class of 1962) retired from the USAF on June 1, 2000, as a Major General in command of Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He directed the Air Force’s $1.4 billion science and technology program which was executed by more than 6,000 people in the laboratory’s component technology directorates and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

The general planned basic research to ensure continued technological superiority; developed and transitioned new technologies for Air Force weapon systems and their supporting infrastructure; and ensured responsive technical support to time-urgent problems whenever and wherever they occurred.

Paul previously commanded the Wright Laboratory which involved a work force of over 2,500 people at Dayton, including 1,700 scientists and engineers. This was the largest aerospace laboratory complex in the Air Force prior to the 1997 formation of the Air Force Research Laboratory.

A 1962 graduate of GHS, Richard R. Paul retired from the USAF on June 1, 2000, as a Major General in command of Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He directed the Air Force’s $1.4 billion science and technology program which was executed by more than 6,000 people in the laboratory’s component technology directorates and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. The general planned basic research to ensure continued technological superiority; developed and transitioned new technologies for Air Force weapon systems and their supporting infrastructure; and ensured responsive technical support to time-urgent problems whenever and wherever they occurred.
The general entered the Air Force in 1967 as a distinguished graduate of Officer Training School, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He has served in two Air Force laboratories, a product center, two major command headquarters, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C., and a joint staff assignment. Prior to his current assignment, he served as commander of Wright Laboratory, the largest aerospace laboratory complex in the Air Force prior to the 1997 formation of the Air Force Research Laboratory.
His educational pursuits following high school graduation were: 1966 Bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering, University of Missouri at Rolla;
1971 Master of science degree in electrical engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio; 1975 Distinguished graduate, Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.;
1980 Distinguished graduate, Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; 1984 Distinguished graduate, Naval War College, Newport, R.I.
MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal
EFFECTIVE DATES OF PROMOTION
Second Lieutenant May 27, 1967
First Lieutenant Nov 27, 1968
Captain May 2

After graduating from Gallatin High School, Paul achieved a degree in electrical engineering at the University of Missouri at Rolla. He earned a 1971 Master of Science degree in electrical engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. He was a 1975 distinguished graduate of the Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; a 1980 distinguished graduate of the Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; and a 1984 distinguished graduate of the Naval War College, Newport, RI.

His major awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, and the Air Force Commendation Medal.

Major General Paul is the son of the late Robert E. and Jane Ann Paul, former longtime residents of Gallatin, MO. Bob Paul was president of First National Bank, Gallatin, for many years. The general and his wife, Joyce, are the parents of a son, David.

— reprinted from the Gallatin North Missourian

Arbelia Opera House – Gallatin, MO

In a 2-story building situated on the southeast corner of the Gallatin business square, the Arbelia Opera House once operated on the second floor above a saloon on the first floor. It was so named for the wife of John Townsend, who built the building about 1890.

In a 2-story building situated on the southeast corner of the Gallatin business square, the Arbelia Opera House once operated on the second floor above a saloon on the first floor. It was so named for the wife of John Townsend, who built the building about 1890.

1912 — The Townsend Block, at the SE corner of the Gallatin business square

A wide stairway provided the entrance, dividing at the top to provide access to and from the side of the room. There was a balcony all along the rear and opposite there was an adequate stage. Dressing rooms were on either side. There were side curtains and drop curtains. The lights along the front of the stage at first were kerosene lamps with reflectors, but these were later replaced with electric lights. Side lamps with reflectors were also placed along the sides the the stage attached to the wings and later replaced with ceiling electric lights.

In those times companies called “road shows” traveled throughout the country. Bookings far ahead were necessary and companies presented fine, high type entertainment. Lifelong Gallatin native Kathrine Brandom recalled how, as a little girl, she frequently sneaked up the stairs to watch the theatrics. Gallatin proved to be a convenient stop where traveling thespians en route between Chicago and Kansas City could manage a “practice performance.” They would come into town on the train, brought to the hotel by bus where they would remain usually for two to three days.

The leading lady was always most attractive and the leading man — sometimes a villain, true to type. Their fine costumes were transported in old-fashioned trunks and taken immediately to the opera house upon arrival. Costumes were quite beautiful and expensive.

These presentations were considered the ultimate in entertainment, featuring the finest of talent. The opera house would be filled to capacity.

The Townsend building housing Arbelia Opera House burned about 1910, a tragedy marking the end of this type of cultural and educational advantages for people living in this area.

Mr. Townsend also built one of the finest homes in Gallatin where he and his wife raised two sons and one daughter. The home was later the residence of Mrs. Preston Robertson and some time after the Townsend family had gone, it became the home of Gov. A.M. Dockery, who made his home with Mr. and Mrs. E.S. Gregory. This home burned during the winter of 1926.

— Daviess County Historical Society

County Jail Closed by Sheriff in 1975

Daviess County no longer has a jail which will accept prisoners. County Sheriff Harold Appley condemned the jail as of Nov. 1, 1975, as being unfit to receive prisoners.

Daviess County no longer has a jail which will accept prisoners. County Sheriff Harold Appley condemned the jail as of Nov. 1, 1975, as being unfit to receive prisoners.

This was the east half of the octagon-shaped jail, after being modified from its original design. The jail was divided into half by a solid steel wall (extreme right) after much of the original iron works were salvaged. The original jail entrance, however, was not removed and remains intact to this day.

In a letter to Presiding Judge Robert Owings, the sheriff stated: “Due to the present condition of the Daviess County Jail, which does not, in my opinion, meet any of the suggested minimum standards of county, state or federal jail committees as to health and sanitation, ventilation, lighting, prisoner safety, visiting facilities and the impossibility of a continual supervision of the prisoners, I feel it my duty, not only for my own personal liability but that of any prisoners, to condemn this jail as of November 1, 1975, until such time as reasonable quarters can be provided for incarceration of suspected, apprehended or convicted violators of the law.”

The sheriff previously said that he is the only official authorized to condemn a jail. He said Circuit Judge Kenneth Lewis had refused to place prisoners in the Daviess County Jail for many months.

(Date Unknown) — The original bars securing jail windows were replaced by the metal grates shown here. It is thought that the original bars were horizontal and offset, allowing prisoners to tilt or open a glass window frame pivoted between the bars.

“I have asked for improvements to be made in the jail from time to time,” Appley said, “but the court says they are broke and lake the funds. I do not question that they are hard-pressed for money but this jail is no longer suitable for anyone to be housed in it.”

Appley said it would probably be cheaper for the court to house prisoners in another jail in the long run since the costs of maintaining and heating the old jail and living quarters are so expensive.

A locker, to hold prisoners’ personal items during incarcerations, was to the left of the heavy metal swinging door entrance into the jail. A combination lock secured the locker. The singular doorway was also the jail’s only exit, thus contributing to the state’s condemnation of the facility’s use.

Following a meeting of the county court and the sheriff, Judge Owings said it appeared the court has but two alternatives. The first is to make repairs and changes to the present jail to meet the standards; second, to consider moving the jail into new facilities on the upper floor of the courthouse.

The court made an inspection of the fourth floor to determine if this alternative would be feasible. Owings said that the improvements submitted by Sheriff Appley for the old jail were “not bad” as far as expense was concerned but the feeling persists that the old jail facility has simply outlived its time and ought to be replaced.

Judge Owings said the county needs a new jail and he would have liked to see one built “but things just haven’t worked out.” He indicated county prisoners would now be sent to nearby jails until a solution for this county can be reached.

The Daviess County Jail has had an interesting history since it was built in 1888. Until some years ago it contained what was commonly called the “squirrel cage” cells which could be spun around like a merry-go-round with one common entrance to all cells. This apparatus was removed in a major remodeling project some years ago but living conditions inside the jail were not helped much. Sanitation, light and heat have remained a serious deficiency.

Sheriff’s residence and Rotary Jail during term of Sheriff Houghton

Living conditions for the sheriff and his family have also been poor in recent years. These quarters are near the cell area and meals for the prisoners were prepared in the sheriff’s kitchen. Just a few days ago, Sheriff and Mrs. Appley were eating lunch when a snake fell out of the ceiling.

“With the condition of the jail what it is,” Appley said, “there isn’t any way to keep the place in good order.”

— reprinted from the Gallatin North Missourian, Nov. 6, 1975

Blueprints of the plans to renovate the Squirrel Cage Jail were drafted by inmates who performed the reconstruction while incarcerated at Western Missouri Correctional Center at Cameron. The static display of the squirrel cage was disassembled, then transported to Gallatin to be reassembled inside the authentic jail building.
A new roof was top priority during renovations in 1991. Ornate metal roof decorations were previously removed. The front porch on the sheriff’s residence required little repair. Sandstone window sills were generally in poor shape but no changeouts were attempted.
Decay of the jail’s brick exterior was accelerated when an interior metal lining was added while modifying the original squirrel cage area to two large cells. The metal held moisture against the brick for many years, causing the mortar to rot. Thus, during reclamation in 1991, the jail’s exterior brick had to be entirely replaced.
The 1889 Squirrel Cage Jail as it appeared in 1995. Available funds did not allow for recreating the original jail bars on the octagon-shaped jail. Those donating to the reclamation project were noted on engraved bricks in a sidewalk surrounding the jail.

Jail Escapee’s Freedom Short-Lived

After the unusual rotary jail was modified during the facility’s final years of use, the incidence of prisoner escapes were infrequent but more likely. One escape, which occurred Sept. 9, 1970, even bordered on the humorous.

After the unusual rotary jail was modified during the facility’s final years of use, the incidence of prisoner escapes were infrequent but more likely. One escape, which occurred Sept. 9, 1970, even bordered on the humorous.

Wilburn Earl McAfee, 22, managed to pry his way through the roof of the jail about the time the beauty contest crowd came out of the Gallatin school auditorium, located across the street. He was seen briefly while he was on the roof. But those who noticed simply thought he was a prankster rather than an escaping prisoner, so McAfee successfully made his escape out of town.

Officers searched for him all during that night. About 5 a.m. he was apprehended while hitchhiking north on Highway 13 near Jameson. Gallatin’s night marshall, Doug Roberts, recognized the fugitive while driving home. McAfee didn’t recognize Roberts since the city officer was in plain clothes and driving a pickup truck.

McAfee was in jail on a disturbing the peace warrant issued in Daviess County, as well as for a count of forgery from Caldwell County after he was jailed.

There is irony in the capture of McAfee by Roberts. Wilburn Roberts’ brother, Danny, was the driver of the car that smashed into the Roberts car east of Coffey, MO, the previous June. This resulted in the death of Mr. Robert’s wife and two of their children. Danny’s brother, Delbert, also died in the crash; Mr. Roberts and eight others were injured.

Summarized by Darryl Wilkinson from a news article published in the Sept. 10, 1970, Gallatin North Missourian

The First Longwood Furnace Plant

The Longwood Automatic Stove Company is now in production in its new building and owner Wayne Critten expects to complete and install at least 200 units before the 1958 heating season is over.

This was the first facility housing the production of Longwood Furnaces, located on the Critten farm in 1958.

1958 — The Longwood Automatic Stove Company is now in production in its new building and owner Wayne Critten expects to complete and install at least 200 units before the 1958 heating season is over.

In an article published on Oct. 16, 1958, by the Gallatin Democrat, Critten admits that he is just “coasting” this year as far as production is concerned. But another few months should see his dealer organization developed and his patented wood burning stove moving out of the plant on an assembly line basis.

The new 85’x138′ factory building is located on the Critten farm about five miles east of Gallatin. It was built by Critten and his workmen over the summer and has thick concrete walls and an aluminum sheathed roof with color plastic skylights. The building contains floor space for machinery required to handle the big slabs of sheet steel and aluminum plus stalls for trucks and a sizeable area for future office space. The first delivery truck has been purchased and is being painted for use.

Critten, who conceived the idea for his stove as the result of seeing so much timber go to waste on the farm, is now bjuilding three models. He has a new 3-foot model in production this year which is receiving wide acceptance. He also makes a 5-foot built-in unit and a 5-foot basement unit.

Quite a number of the stoves have been in use in the area the past several seasons and all are establishing almost unbelievable results. The stoves, which are thermostatically controlled, operate without a blower.

— from an article published in the Oct. 16, 1958, edition of the Gallatin Democrat

Winston coal mine once a busy place

A one-time major Daviess County industry played out to oblivion in 1958. At a county tax sale, the Winston coal mine failed to produce one interested bidder with only a tax bill of $317.10 pending. That wouldn’t have been the case in earlier years.

A one-time major Daviess County industry played out to oblivion in 1958. At a county tax sale, the Winston coal mine failed to produce one interested bidder with only a tax bill of $317.10 pending. That wouldn’t have been the case in earlier years.

Efforts to mine coal in Daviess County dates back as far as 1871 when an effort was made to form a company soon after a vein of fuel was discovered on a farm belonging to John S. Hughes. This failed, and nothing was done until about the turn of the century when the first shaft was sunk at a depth of 345 feet.

Lack of capital, cooperation and interest soon halted that venture. But in 1934 J.O. Elliott of Cameron opened the shaft, extended it and struck a 36-inch vein of fine quality bituminous coal. This effort ended in failure when litigation over the property forced its sale to satisfy creditors.

Winston Coal Mine 1937

The Winston Coal Company was formed in 1936 and a new larger shaft was sunk 300 feet from the old shaft. These were connected and new hoisting machinery, cutting equipment and a double caqe were installed. Improvements increased output to 200 tons a day for a time. There were as many as 50 men employed at the mine and Daviess County coal was trucked into all sections of Northwest Missouri.

In its later years of operation, the property changed ownership frequently and attempts to operate the mine profitably failed. Eventually, federal inspectors would no longer approve the shafts for safe working without costly repairs which the business could no longer support.

— from the Sept. 4, 1958, edition of the Gallatin Democrat