Introduction

When the 20s arrived, it seemed as though progress had been made in our country. Cars were coming on the scene. Mud roads were being improved, and rock crushers were opened in order to accommodate these new horseless carriages. Electricity was being installed in a few homes. Even a few gasoline tractors slowly emerged on the small farms.

When the 20s arrived, it seemed as though progress had been made in our country. Cars were coming on the scene. Mud roads were being improved, and rock crushers were opened in order to accommodate these new horseless carriages. Electricity was being installed in a few homes. Even a few gasoline tractors slowly emerged on the small farms.

At a turtle’s pace, the pendulum started to swing in the opposite direction. Farmers and small businesses were threatened by the financial upset. Many banks closed their doors and their failures filtered down to the working class. Red figures appeared on financial statements.

It’s hard to say what year the Great Depression started. Different people have different opinions about its beginnings. Among those ware The Stock Market Crash of 1929, the 1930 drought, and the droughts of 1934 and 1936. All the bank failures that took place in the 1920s, lead me to believe the seed for the Great Depression was sown prior to the 30s and got progressively worse.

The Great Depression was truly a time of depression. People were depressed and there seemed to be little hope. Each day brought forth new drudgeries and new hardships. There was a surplus of banks, but a shortage of money. There was a surplus of workers, but a shortage of jobs. There was a surplus of livestock, but throngs of people standing in food lines. Crops were both low in quantity and quality. Farm auctions occurred almost daily. The pressure was so great, a few people committed suicide. Probably, anyone who lived during these times remembers them as well as any war.

Researched by Wilbur Bush