Grand River

By June 1933, 200 men were stationed at the CCC camp at Princeton. At first the men were scheduled to do soil conservation work, but the plans were changed to straightening a nearby stretch of the Grand River.

By June 1933, 200 men were stationed at the CCC camp at Princeton. At first the men were scheduled to do soil conservation work, but the plans were changed to straightening a nearby stretch of the Grand River.

The river was in drainage from the Iowa line to a point about three miles north of Princeton. The right-of way for the river was available without cost, but the people at the vicinity had never been able to get together enough money to pay for the expense of digging a channel. Now a force of 200 men was available, without cost of the community, to do the digging. It was thought the work would greatly benefit the farmers on the Grand River bottom whose corps were periodically ruined by high water.

Many bridges like this spanning the Grand River were swept away during the Floods of 1993. Steel frame, wooden plank bridges were built for a simpler day. This is typical of many bridges built during the 1930s throughout North Missouri.

(I have no documentation that the work was ever done. Maybe if you do use it, someone would write in and tell more about it.)

6/22/33 Plan to take kinks out of Grand River

Researched by Wilbur Bush