A Chronology of Gallatin Schools

In a school election in June of 1909, a vote was passed in favor of building a new school house for the Gallatin students at a cost of $32,500. The proposition carried by a vote of 285 to 103. The north and west parts of town very generally voted for the measure, but the south didn�t seem to be in favor of it.

In a school election in June of 1909, a vote was passed in favor of building a new school house for the Gallatin students at a cost of $32,500. The proposition carried by a vote of 285 to 103. The north and west parts of town very generally voted for the measure, but the south didn’t seem to be in favor of it.

The main part of this school was erected in 1871 at a cost of $12,500 without furnishings. Contractor was A.F. Ely (for $11,000 excluding the heating and bell work). The addition in the early 1890s. In 1873 enrollment numbers were as follows: 281 white and 51 colored, for a 331 total although the colored were housed in a separate school building. Faculty in 1873 were as follows: A.C. Burbank, principal and teacher $850; Mrs. Mary E. Swisher, grammar school teacher, $450; Mrs. Nellie Weston, intermediate school teacher, $400; Mrs. Ella Wynn, primary school teacher, $400. Classes were dismissed on March 31, 1910, so that this building could be razed quickly to make way for a new school on the same grounds to be completed by the following October.

The old building was to be torn down immediately. The plans and the specifications were practically ready and the new structure would soon be underway.

It was said the plans would give the people a school building that was a model for simplicity of architecture, with every room splendidly ventilated and lighted. The building was to be constructed of the best vitrified red brick, with stone trimmings. The outside walls were to be 18 inches thick and the foundation of cement.

The building was to be three stories high and would be provided with sanitary closets, lavatories, a large gymnasium for the girls, and the most modern apparatus for ventilation and heat. The hallways would be large, the stairways broad, and in every other way, every safe guard provided for the children’s safety and convenience.

Researched by Wilbur Bush, Gallatin (2004) from Gallatin’s New School Building, June 10, 1909

The post card photo is stamped 1907, showing the Gallatin school. [Johnnie Black Collection]
This penny post card, dated 1914, shows Gallatin’s public high school with the main entrance facing West Grand Street (Bus. Hwy 6). The WPA gymnasium was later added to the east side, at right. The stone foundation on the west side of the building are from the foundation of the previous school building. [Johnnie Black Collection]
Post card showing Gallatin High School, facing West Grand Street (Business Hwy 6) in 1948, printed by Wright’s Studio, 100-1/2 Main Street, Trenton, MO, Phone 240. [Johnnie Black Collection]