CWA

In 1933, six C.W.A. projects were scheduled to be initiated. The six scheduled projects for Daviess County were:

1. Improving the road from Brown cemetery and building roads and fences within Brown and Lile cemeteries, in the sum of $1,675.

2. Building city sewer serving school house for a distance of three blocks with an estimated cost of $5,127, and the city would furnish any necessary new pipe.

3. Saving Magill bridge which spans the Grand River southeast of Gallatin, in south Daviess County drainage district. Estimated cost $1,662.

4. Moving of abandoned bridge north of Pattonsburg spanning Big Creek with an estimated cost of $778.

5. Landscaping, leveling, and beautifying of Altamont school grounds and providing playgrounds with an estimated cost of $1,476.

6. Grading, surfacing and building of improved road from Highway 6, at Seth Macy corner to Magill with an estimated cost of $5,000.

In 1933, six C.W.A. projects were scheduled to be initiated. The six scheduled projects for Daviess County were:

1. Improving the road from Brown cemetery and building roads and fences within Brown and Lile cemeteries, in the sum of $1,675.

2. Building city sewer serving school house for a distance of three blocks with an estimated cost of $5,127, and the city would furnish any necessary new pipe.

3. Saving Magill bridge which spans the Grand River southeast of Gallatin, in south Daviess County drainage district. Estimated cost $1,662.

4. Moving of abandoned bridge north of Pattonsburg spanning Big Creek with an estimated cost of $778.

5. Landscaping, leveling, and beautifying of Altamont school grounds and providing playgrounds with an estimated cost of $1,476.

6. Grading, surfacing and building of improved road from Highway 6, at Seth Macy corner to Magill with an estimated cost of $5,000.

C.W.A. work was started in Daviess County with 223 men and 30 women being put to work. The men would work 30 hours per week and be paid 35 cents per hour. The street improvements were made possible by using C.W.A. labor, and the property owners contributing for all other expenses, purchase of chat, trucks, etc. it was reported that by February 15, 1934 practically all of the streets would be surfaced.

Some of the projects included were highway work, cemetery and school ground improvements.

In Gallatin, work was done on two sewer extensions with one being in the southeast part. The women were sewing in the sewing rooms.

In Cameron, some of their funds were being used to improve streets and alleys. Truckers were contracted to haul rock from the quarries for 25 cents per ton.

Ten men were utilized to make improvement at the McKinley School, and getting ready for road work. A rock crusher was secured for the crushing of rock to be used on the city streets.

Between 150 and 200 men ad registered for work. Five women were also employed under the C.W.A. sorting, repairing, and making over clothing and bedding for the united charities. There would be a 30 hour work week.

C.W.S.

The C.W.S. was a program of the women’s work division and part of the C.W.A. The job description and the weekly pay rate for these women in Daviess County were: secretary, $13.50; clerical aids, $15-20; two nurses, $28.85; home economic advisor $28.85; and recreational director $20.

"CWA Work to Be Spread Out More" The Gallatin Democrat, Volume 65, Number 28, January 18, 1934

Researched by Wilbur Bush